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Flexibility of temporal expectations for triple subdivision of a beat.

Repp BH, Jendoubi H - Adv Cogn Psychol (2009)

Bottom Line: The present study asked whether latent expectancies at 1/3 and 2/3 of the IBI can be induced by a global experimental context of triple subdivision, and whether a local context of consistently phase-shifted triple subdivisions can induce different expectancies.These results suggest that temporal referents between beats, which typically are linked to simple ratios of time spans, are flexible and context-dependent.In addition, we show that the PCR, a response to expectancy violation, is independent of and sometimes contrary to the simultaneous phase adaptation required by a change in subdivision timing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, Connecticut.

ABSTRACT
When tapping in synchrony with an isochronous sequence of beats, participants respond automatically to an unexpectedly early or late beat by shifting their next tap; this is termed the phase correction response (PCR). A PCR has also been observed in response to unexpected perturbations of metrical subdivisions of a beat, which suggests that participants have temporal expectancies for subdivisions to occur at particular time points. It has been demonstrated that a latent temporal expectancy at 1/2 of the inter-beat interval (IBI) exists even in the absence of explicit duple subdivision in previous IBIs of a sequence. The present study asked whether latent expectancies at 1/3 and 2/3 of the IBI can be induced by a global experimental context of triple subdivision, and whether a local context of consistently phase-shifted triple subdivisions can induce different expectancies. Using the PCR as the dependent variable, we find weak evidence for latent expectancies but strong evidence for context-induced shifts in expectancies. These results suggest that temporal referents between beats, which typically are linked to simple ratios of time spans, are flexible and context-dependent. In addition, we show that the PCR, a response to expectancy violation, is independent of and sometimes contrary to the simultaneous phase adaptation required by a change in subdivision timing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean asynchrony trajectories in all S1 conditions.
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Figure 9: Mean asynchrony trajectories in all S1 conditions.

Mentions: Turning to the S1 conditions in Figure 9, there are clear PCRs distinct from phase adaptation in all conditions except the three in which there was no phase shift and one (A empty, B late) in which the PCR can be seen as part of (i.e., goes in the same direction as) the phase adaptation. In some conditions (e.g., A late, B early), the PCR is contrary to the phase adaptation. There is also some evidence of long-lasting effects of the A-pattern, particularly of the empty pattern, on B-pattern asynchronies.


Flexibility of temporal expectations for triple subdivision of a beat.

Repp BH, Jendoubi H - Adv Cogn Psychol (2009)

Mean asynchrony trajectories in all S1 conditions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2865005&req=5

Figure 9: Mean asynchrony trajectories in all S1 conditions.
Mentions: Turning to the S1 conditions in Figure 9, there are clear PCRs distinct from phase adaptation in all conditions except the three in which there was no phase shift and one (A empty, B late) in which the PCR can be seen as part of (i.e., goes in the same direction as) the phase adaptation. In some conditions (e.g., A late, B early), the PCR is contrary to the phase adaptation. There is also some evidence of long-lasting effects of the A-pattern, particularly of the empty pattern, on B-pattern asynchronies.

Bottom Line: The present study asked whether latent expectancies at 1/3 and 2/3 of the IBI can be induced by a global experimental context of triple subdivision, and whether a local context of consistently phase-shifted triple subdivisions can induce different expectancies.These results suggest that temporal referents between beats, which typically are linked to simple ratios of time spans, are flexible and context-dependent.In addition, we show that the PCR, a response to expectancy violation, is independent of and sometimes contrary to the simultaneous phase adaptation required by a change in subdivision timing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, Connecticut.

ABSTRACT
When tapping in synchrony with an isochronous sequence of beats, participants respond automatically to an unexpectedly early or late beat by shifting their next tap; this is termed the phase correction response (PCR). A PCR has also been observed in response to unexpected perturbations of metrical subdivisions of a beat, which suggests that participants have temporal expectancies for subdivisions to occur at particular time points. It has been demonstrated that a latent temporal expectancy at 1/2 of the inter-beat interval (IBI) exists even in the absence of explicit duple subdivision in previous IBIs of a sequence. The present study asked whether latent expectancies at 1/3 and 2/3 of the IBI can be induced by a global experimental context of triple subdivision, and whether a local context of consistently phase-shifted triple subdivisions can induce different expectancies. Using the PCR as the dependent variable, we find weak evidence for latent expectancies but strong evidence for context-induced shifts in expectancies. These results suggest that temporal referents between beats, which typically are linked to simple ratios of time spans, are flexible and context-dependent. In addition, we show that the PCR, a response to expectancy violation, is independent of and sometimes contrary to the simultaneous phase adaptation required by a change in subdivision timing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus