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Global and local perceptual style, field-independence, and central coherence: An attempt at concept validation.

Milne E, Szczerbinski M - Adv Cogn Psychol (2009)

Bottom Line: We found evidence for the existence of a narrowly defined weak central coherence (field-independence) factor that received loadings from only a few of the tasks used to operationalise this concept.The results suggest that future studies of perceptual styles should include tasks whose theoretical validity is empirically verified, as such validity cannot be established merely on the basis of a priori task analysis.Moreover, the use of multiple indices is required to capture the latent dimensions of perceptual styles reliably.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TP, UK.

ABSTRACT
Historically, the concepts of field-independence, closure flexibility, and weak central coherence have been used to denote a locally, rather globally, dominated perceptual style. To date, there has been little attempt to clarify the relationship between these constructs, or to examine the convergent validity of the various tasks purported to measure them. To address this, we administered 14 tasks that have been used to study visual perceptual styles to a group of 90 neuro-typical adults. The data were subjected to exploratory factor analysis. We found evidence for the existence of a narrowly defined weak central coherence (field-independence) factor that received loadings from only a few of the tasks used to operationalise this concept. This factor can most aptly be described as representing the ability to dis-embed a simple stimulus from a more complex array. The results suggest that future studies of perceptual styles should include tasks whose theoretical validity is empirically verified, as such validity cannot be established merely on the basis of a priori task analysis. Moreover, the use of multiple indices is required to capture the latent dimensions of perceptual styles reliably.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of the stimuli used in the pen and paper tasks. 1								Ekstrom, French, Harman, & Derman (1976) Kit of								Factor-Refrenced Cognitive Test (KIT) materials are reprinted by								permission of Educational Testing Service, the copyright owner.								However, the test questions and any other testing information is								provided in their entirety by American Psychological Association. No								endorsement of this publication by Educational Testing Service								should be inferred. 2 Adapted from Shorr, Delis,								& Massman (1992), from “Memory for the Rey-Osterrieth								Figure: Perceptual Clustering, Encoding, and Storage”,								Neuropsychology, 6, 43-50. 3 Reprinted from the Visual								and Object Spatial Perception Battery, with permission from Harcourt								Assessment. 4 Reproduced by special permission of the								Publisher, MIND GARDEN, Inc. (www.mindgarden.com) from the GROUP								EMBEDDED FIGURES TEST by Herman A. Witkin, Philip K. Oltman, Evelyn								Raskin, & Stephen A. Karp. Copyright 1971, 2002 by Herman								A.  Witkin et al.. Further reproduction is prohibited without the								Publisher’s written consent.
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Figure 1: Examples of the stimuli used in the pen and paper tasks. 1 Ekstrom, French, Harman, & Derman (1976) Kit of Factor-Refrenced Cognitive Test (KIT) materials are reprinted by permission of Educational Testing Service, the copyright owner. However, the test questions and any other testing information is provided in their entirety by American Psychological Association. No endorsement of this publication by Educational Testing Service should be inferred. 2 Adapted from Shorr, Delis, & Massman (1992), from “Memory for the Rey-Osterrieth Figure: Perceptual Clustering, Encoding, and Storage”, Neuropsychology, 6, 43-50. 3 Reprinted from the Visual and Object Spatial Perception Battery, with permission from Harcourt Assessment. 4 Reproduced by special permission of the Publisher, MIND GARDEN, Inc. (www.mindgarden.com) from the GROUP EMBEDDED FIGURES TEST by Herman A. Witkin, Philip K. Oltman, Evelyn Raskin, & Stephen A. Karp. Copyright 1971, 2002 by Herman A.  Witkin et al.. Further reproduction is prohibited without the Publisher’s written consent.

Mentions: Stimuli were line drawings of geometric patterns. Some of the patterns contained the embedded target configuration. Participants were required to mark, for each item, whether or not the target configuration occurred (see Figure 1). Following an untimed practise session of 10 stimuli, two parts of the test were given. In each part, participants were allowed 60 s to mark whether the target was present or absent in as many patterns as possible. The dependent variable was the number of correct responses given in both parts, out of a possible 200.


Global and local perceptual style, field-independence, and central coherence: An attempt at concept validation.

Milne E, Szczerbinski M - Adv Cogn Psychol (2009)

Examples of the stimuli used in the pen and paper tasks. 1								Ekstrom, French, Harman, & Derman (1976) Kit of								Factor-Refrenced Cognitive Test (KIT) materials are reprinted by								permission of Educational Testing Service, the copyright owner.								However, the test questions and any other testing information is								provided in their entirety by American Psychological Association. No								endorsement of this publication by Educational Testing Service								should be inferred. 2 Adapted from Shorr, Delis,								& Massman (1992), from “Memory for the Rey-Osterrieth								Figure: Perceptual Clustering, Encoding, and Storage”,								Neuropsychology, 6, 43-50. 3 Reprinted from the Visual								and Object Spatial Perception Battery, with permission from Harcourt								Assessment. 4 Reproduced by special permission of the								Publisher, MIND GARDEN, Inc. (www.mindgarden.com) from the GROUP								EMBEDDED FIGURES TEST by Herman A. Witkin, Philip K. Oltman, Evelyn								Raskin, & Stephen A. Karp. Copyright 1971, 2002 by Herman								A.  Witkin et al.. Further reproduction is prohibited without the								Publisher’s written consent.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864999&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of the stimuli used in the pen and paper tasks. 1 Ekstrom, French, Harman, & Derman (1976) Kit of Factor-Refrenced Cognitive Test (KIT) materials are reprinted by permission of Educational Testing Service, the copyright owner. However, the test questions and any other testing information is provided in their entirety by American Psychological Association. No endorsement of this publication by Educational Testing Service should be inferred. 2 Adapted from Shorr, Delis, & Massman (1992), from “Memory for the Rey-Osterrieth Figure: Perceptual Clustering, Encoding, and Storage”, Neuropsychology, 6, 43-50. 3 Reprinted from the Visual and Object Spatial Perception Battery, with permission from Harcourt Assessment. 4 Reproduced by special permission of the Publisher, MIND GARDEN, Inc. (www.mindgarden.com) from the GROUP EMBEDDED FIGURES TEST by Herman A. Witkin, Philip K. Oltman, Evelyn Raskin, & Stephen A. Karp. Copyright 1971, 2002 by Herman A.  Witkin et al.. Further reproduction is prohibited without the Publisher’s written consent.
Mentions: Stimuli were line drawings of geometric patterns. Some of the patterns contained the embedded target configuration. Participants were required to mark, for each item, whether or not the target configuration occurred (see Figure 1). Following an untimed practise session of 10 stimuli, two parts of the test were given. In each part, participants were allowed 60 s to mark whether the target was present or absent in as many patterns as possible. The dependent variable was the number of correct responses given in both parts, out of a possible 200.

Bottom Line: We found evidence for the existence of a narrowly defined weak central coherence (field-independence) factor that received loadings from only a few of the tasks used to operationalise this concept.The results suggest that future studies of perceptual styles should include tasks whose theoretical validity is empirically verified, as such validity cannot be established merely on the basis of a priori task analysis.Moreover, the use of multiple indices is required to capture the latent dimensions of perceptual styles reliably.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TP, UK.

ABSTRACT
Historically, the concepts of field-independence, closure flexibility, and weak central coherence have been used to denote a locally, rather globally, dominated perceptual style. To date, there has been little attempt to clarify the relationship between these constructs, or to examine the convergent validity of the various tasks purported to measure them. To address this, we administered 14 tasks that have been used to study visual perceptual styles to a group of 90 neuro-typical adults. The data were subjected to exploratory factor analysis. We found evidence for the existence of a narrowly defined weak central coherence (field-independence) factor that received loadings from only a few of the tasks used to operationalise this concept. This factor can most aptly be described as representing the ability to dis-embed a simple stimulus from a more complex array. The results suggest that future studies of perceptual styles should include tasks whose theoretical validity is empirically verified, as such validity cannot be established merely on the basis of a priori task analysis. Moreover, the use of multiple indices is required to capture the latent dimensions of perceptual styles reliably.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus