Limits...
The process of spatial knowledge acquisition in a square and a circular virtual environment.

Jansen-Osmann P, Heil M - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Bottom Line: In all measurements of spatial knowledge acquisition an overall developmental performance increase from younger children to adults was found.In contrast to that, the exploration and learning behavior did not differ between adults and children.The advantage of spatial knowledge acquisition in a circular environment in three of four tasks is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the effect of the environmental structure (circular vs. square environment) on spatial knowledge acquisition in a desktop virtual situation in which self-determined movement was allowed with a total of 120 participants: 7-, 8-year-old children; 11, 12-year-old children, and adults. In all measurements of spatial knowledge acquisition an overall developmental performance increase from younger children to adults was found. In contrast to that, the exploration and learning behavior did not differ between adults and children. Furthermore, the environmental structure influencedthenumber of trials needed to learn the two routes used and the distance walked to the determined landmarks. All these tasks were easier in a circular than in a square environment. This influenceofthe environmental structure was absent in the direction estimations task. The advantage of spatial knowledge acquisition in a circular environment in three of four tasks is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Figure 1a shows an overview of the square maze. The shortest route to							reach the goal figuresismarked.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864992&req=5

Figure 1: Figure 1a shows an overview of the square maze. The shortest route to reach the goal figuresismarked.

Mentions: The study was conducted in a virtual world using the software 3D Game Studio. There were two symmetrical versions of the virtual world with either curved or straight routes (circular vs. square world). Both virtual mazes (see Figure 1) consisted of three main route-networks linked by eight routes which branched off at an angle of either 90° or 45°. As a consequence, at decision points routes branched off at an angle of either 0 (straight ahead), 90, 45 or 135° (see Jansen-Osmann, Schmid, & Heil, 2007a, Jansen-Osmann, Schmid, & Heil, 2007b). Because the shape of the surrounding area was not perceivable from the participant’s point of view, the construction of both virtual worlds was not confounded with the external frame of reference.


The process of spatial knowledge acquisition in a square and a circular virtual environment.

Jansen-Osmann P, Heil M - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Figure 1a shows an overview of the square maze. The shortest route to							reach the goal figuresismarked.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864992&req=5

Figure 1: Figure 1a shows an overview of the square maze. The shortest route to reach the goal figuresismarked.
Mentions: The study was conducted in a virtual world using the software 3D Game Studio. There were two symmetrical versions of the virtual world with either curved or straight routes (circular vs. square world). Both virtual mazes (see Figure 1) consisted of three main route-networks linked by eight routes which branched off at an angle of either 90° or 45°. As a consequence, at decision points routes branched off at an angle of either 0 (straight ahead), 90, 45 or 135° (see Jansen-Osmann, Schmid, & Heil, 2007a, Jansen-Osmann, Schmid, & Heil, 2007b). Because the shape of the surrounding area was not perceivable from the participant’s point of view, the construction of both virtual worlds was not confounded with the external frame of reference.

Bottom Line: In all measurements of spatial knowledge acquisition an overall developmental performance increase from younger children to adults was found.In contrast to that, the exploration and learning behavior did not differ between adults and children.The advantage of spatial knowledge acquisition in a circular environment in three of four tasks is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the effect of the environmental structure (circular vs. square environment) on spatial knowledge acquisition in a desktop virtual situation in which self-determined movement was allowed with a total of 120 participants: 7-, 8-year-old children; 11, 12-year-old children, and adults. In all measurements of spatial knowledge acquisition an overall developmental performance increase from younger children to adults was found. In contrast to that, the exploration and learning behavior did not differ between adults and children. Furthermore, the environmental structure influencedthenumber of trials needed to learn the two routes used and the distance walked to the determined landmarks. All these tasks were easier in a circular than in a square environment. This influenceofthe environmental structure was absent in the direction estimations task. The advantage of spatial knowledge acquisition in a circular environment in three of four tasks is discussed.

No MeSH data available.