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Conditional accuracy in response interference tasks: Evidence from the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task.

Stins JF, Polderman JC, Boomsma DI, de Geus EJ - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Bottom Line: Two well-known response interference tasks are the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task.The tasks are logically equivalent, and comparable effects of current and previous stimulus type (congruent or incongruent) have been shown with regard to reaction time (RT).We specifically tested whether these effects interacted with the speed of responding using conditional accuracy functions (CAFs).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute MOVE, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences,VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Two well-known response interference tasks are the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task. The tasks are logically equivalent, and comparable effects of current and previous stimulus type (congruent or incongruent) have been shown with regard to reaction time (RT). Here, we investigated whether interference and sequential trial effects also had comparable effects on accuracy. We specifically tested whether these effects interacted with the speed of responding using conditional accuracy functions (CAFs). The CAFs revealed that in both tasks congruency and sequential trial effects on accuracy are found only in trials with fast responses (< 600 ms). Sequential trial effects on accuracy were weaker for the flanker task than for the spatial conflict task. In very fast trials (< 400 ms) response activation by distracting flankers led to below-chance performance in the flanker task, but response activation by incongruent spatial location did not lead to below-chance performance in the spatial conflict task. The pattern of results hints at subtle differences in processing architecture between the tasks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean percentage of correct responses as a function of RT-bin, for the flanker						task (A, top) and the spatial conflict task (B, bottom), for each of the						four congruency transitions.
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Figure 2: Mean percentage of correct responses as a function of RT-bin, for the flanker task (A, top) and the spatial conflict task (B, bottom), for each of the four congruency transitions.

Mentions: The temporal dynamics of these effects can also be seen from the conditional accuracy functions, shown in Figure 2a (flanker task) and Figure 2b (spatial conflict task). First, as can be seen from both figures, accuracy sharply increased with increasing RT, attaining near-perfect levels at about 600 ms. Thus, the observed effects of trial type and previous trial type on accuracy originate mainly in the fast RT-regions. Second, the tasks differed with respect to congruency repetition effects. For the spatial conflict task, congruency repetition yielded unambiguously more accurate performance on fast trials than congruency change. For the flanker task, however, only iI transitions yielded better performance than cI transitions, whereas there was no difference between iC and cC transitions. Third, for the flanker task the accuracy for incongruent trials that are preceded by congruent trials obtained with the fastest RT bin is 26.2%, which is well below chance level, T(41) = 3.81, p < .001. The accuracy level for iI trials at the same RT bin is 43.4%, which did not statistically differ from 50%. For the spatial conflict task, in contrast, accuracy for the cI trials at the fastest bin does not drop below chance level. The accuracy level for this subcondition is 46%, which is not statistically different from 50%.


Conditional accuracy in response interference tasks: Evidence from the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task.

Stins JF, Polderman JC, Boomsma DI, de Geus EJ - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Mean percentage of correct responses as a function of RT-bin, for the flanker						task (A, top) and the spatial conflict task (B, bottom), for each of the						four congruency transitions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864991&req=5

Figure 2: Mean percentage of correct responses as a function of RT-bin, for the flanker task (A, top) and the spatial conflict task (B, bottom), for each of the four congruency transitions.
Mentions: The temporal dynamics of these effects can also be seen from the conditional accuracy functions, shown in Figure 2a (flanker task) and Figure 2b (spatial conflict task). First, as can be seen from both figures, accuracy sharply increased with increasing RT, attaining near-perfect levels at about 600 ms. Thus, the observed effects of trial type and previous trial type on accuracy originate mainly in the fast RT-regions. Second, the tasks differed with respect to congruency repetition effects. For the spatial conflict task, congruency repetition yielded unambiguously more accurate performance on fast trials than congruency change. For the flanker task, however, only iI transitions yielded better performance than cI transitions, whereas there was no difference between iC and cC transitions. Third, for the flanker task the accuracy for incongruent trials that are preceded by congruent trials obtained with the fastest RT bin is 26.2%, which is well below chance level, T(41) = 3.81, p < .001. The accuracy level for iI trials at the same RT bin is 43.4%, which did not statistically differ from 50%. For the spatial conflict task, in contrast, accuracy for the cI trials at the fastest bin does not drop below chance level. The accuracy level for this subcondition is 46%, which is not statistically different from 50%.

Bottom Line: Two well-known response interference tasks are the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task.The tasks are logically equivalent, and comparable effects of current and previous stimulus type (congruent or incongruent) have been shown with regard to reaction time (RT).We specifically tested whether these effects interacted with the speed of responding using conditional accuracy functions (CAFs).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute MOVE, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences,VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Two well-known response interference tasks are the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task. The tasks are logically equivalent, and comparable effects of current and previous stimulus type (congruent or incongruent) have been shown with regard to reaction time (RT). Here, we investigated whether interference and sequential trial effects also had comparable effects on accuracy. We specifically tested whether these effects interacted with the speed of responding using conditional accuracy functions (CAFs). The CAFs revealed that in both tasks congruency and sequential trial effects on accuracy are found only in trials with fast responses (< 600 ms). Sequential trial effects on accuracy were weaker for the flanker task than for the spatial conflict task. In very fast trials (< 400 ms) response activation by distracting flankers led to below-chance performance in the flanker task, but response activation by incongruent spatial location did not lead to below-chance performance in the spatial conflict task. The pattern of results hints at subtle differences in processing architecture between the tasks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus