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Conditional accuracy in response interference tasks: Evidence from the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task.

Stins JF, Polderman JC, Boomsma DI, de Geus EJ - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Bottom Line: Two well-known response interference tasks are the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task.The tasks are logically equivalent, and comparable effects of current and previous stimulus type (congruent or incongruent) have been shown with regard to reaction time (RT).We specifically tested whether these effects interacted with the speed of responding using conditional accuracy functions (CAFs).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute MOVE, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences,VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Two well-known response interference tasks are the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task. The tasks are logically equivalent, and comparable effects of current and previous stimulus type (congruent or incongruent) have been shown with regard to reaction time (RT). Here, we investigated whether interference and sequential trial effects also had comparable effects on accuracy. We specifically tested whether these effects interacted with the speed of responding using conditional accuracy functions (CAFs). The CAFs revealed that in both tasks congruency and sequential trial effects on accuracy are found only in trials with fast responses (< 600 ms). Sequential trial effects on accuracy were weaker for the flanker task than for the spatial conflict task. In very fast trials (< 400 ms) response activation by distracting flankers led to below-chance performance in the flanker task, but response activation by incongruent spatial location did not lead to below-chance performance in the spatial conflict task. The pattern of results hints at subtle differences in processing architecture between the tasks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean percentage of correct responses for the flanker task and the spatial						conflict task for congruent and incongruent trials, as a function of the						preceding trial type (C = Congruent, I = Incongruent).
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Figure 1: Mean percentage of correct responses for the flanker task and the spatial conflict task for congruent and incongruent trials, as a function of the preceding trial type (C = Congruent, I = Incongruent).

Mentions: Due to technical problems the Simon data of 5 subjects and the flanker data of 3 different subjects were not stored on the computer. In addition, the flanker data of 1 subject were discarded due to an extremely high error rate (63% errors in the incongruent condition). The mean percentages correct for both tasks, as a function of trial type and previous trial type are shown in Figure 1.


Conditional accuracy in response interference tasks: Evidence from the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task.

Stins JF, Polderman JC, Boomsma DI, de Geus EJ - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Mean percentage of correct responses for the flanker task and the spatial						conflict task for congruent and incongruent trials, as a function of the						preceding trial type (C = Congruent, I = Incongruent).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864991&req=5

Figure 1: Mean percentage of correct responses for the flanker task and the spatial conflict task for congruent and incongruent trials, as a function of the preceding trial type (C = Congruent, I = Incongruent).
Mentions: Due to technical problems the Simon data of 5 subjects and the flanker data of 3 different subjects were not stored on the computer. In addition, the flanker data of 1 subject were discarded due to an extremely high error rate (63% errors in the incongruent condition). The mean percentages correct for both tasks, as a function of trial type and previous trial type are shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Two well-known response interference tasks are the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task.The tasks are logically equivalent, and comparable effects of current and previous stimulus type (congruent or incongruent) have been shown with regard to reaction time (RT).We specifically tested whether these effects interacted with the speed of responding using conditional accuracy functions (CAFs).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute MOVE, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences,VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Two well-known response interference tasks are the Eriksen flanker task and the spatial conflict task. The tasks are logically equivalent, and comparable effects of current and previous stimulus type (congruent or incongruent) have been shown with regard to reaction time (RT). Here, we investigated whether interference and sequential trial effects also had comparable effects on accuracy. We specifically tested whether these effects interacted with the speed of responding using conditional accuracy functions (CAFs). The CAFs revealed that in both tasks congruency and sequential trial effects on accuracy are found only in trials with fast responses (< 600 ms). Sequential trial effects on accuracy were weaker for the flanker task than for the spatial conflict task. In very fast trials (< 400 ms) response activation by distracting flankers led to below-chance performance in the flanker task, but response activation by incongruent spatial location did not lead to below-chance performance in the spatial conflict task. The pattern of results hints at subtle differences in processing architecture between the tasks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus