Limits...
Emotion and memory: Event-related potential indices predictive for subsequent successful memory depend on the emotional mood state.

Kiefer M, Schuch S, Schenck W, Fiedler K - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Bottom Line: We assessed whether the subsequent memory effect (SME), an electrophysiological index of successful memory encoding, varies as a function of participants' current mood state.These differences in the scalp topography of the SME suggest that successful recall relies on partially separable neural circuits for good and bad mood states.The results are consistent with theoretical accounts of the interface between emotion and cognition that propose mood-dependent cognitive styles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Ulm, Department of Psychiatry, Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The present research investigated the influencesof emotional mood states on cognitive processes and neural circuits during long-term memory encoding using event-related potentials (ERPs). We assessed whether the subsequent memory effect (SME), an electrophysiological index of successful memory encoding, varies as a function of participants' current mood state. ERPs were recorded while participants in good or bad mood states were presented with words that had to be memorized for subsequent recall. In contrast to participants in bad mood, participants in good mood most frequently applied elaborative encoding styles. At the neurophysiological level, ERP analyses showed that potentials to subsequently recalled words were more positive than to forgotten words at central electrodes in the time interval of 500-650 ms after stimulus onset (SME). At fronto-central electrodes, a polarity-reversed SME was obtained. The strongest modulations of the SME by participants' mood state were obtained at fronto-temporal electrodes. These differences in the scalp topography of the SME suggest that successful recall relies on partially separable neural circuits for good and bad mood states. The results are consistent with theoretical accounts of the interface between emotion and cognition that propose mood-dependent cognitive styles.

No MeSH data available.


Grand averaged ERPs of participants in good mood (A) and bad mood (B)							from selected electrode positions according to the standard							10/20 system (fronto-temporal: F9/F10; central:							C1/C2) as a function of subsequent recall and encoding task.							Negativity is plotted down.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864990&req=5

Figure 1: Grand averaged ERPs of participants in good mood (A) and bad mood (B) from selected electrode positions according to the standard 10/20 system (fronto-temporal: F9/F10; central: C1/C2) as a function of subsequent recall and encoding task. Negativity is plotted down.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows that recalled words elicited a more positive potential (between 500-700 ms over the parietal and central scalp) than words which were not recalled. During the same time interval, a polarity-reversal was found over fronto-temporal areas where recalled words elicited a relatively greater negative potential than not recalled words.


Emotion and memory: Event-related potential indices predictive for subsequent successful memory depend on the emotional mood state.

Kiefer M, Schuch S, Schenck W, Fiedler K - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Grand averaged ERPs of participants in good mood (A) and bad mood (B)							from selected electrode positions according to the standard							10/20 system (fronto-temporal: F9/F10; central:							C1/C2) as a function of subsequent recall and encoding task.							Negativity is plotted down.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864990&req=5

Figure 1: Grand averaged ERPs of participants in good mood (A) and bad mood (B) from selected electrode positions according to the standard 10/20 system (fronto-temporal: F9/F10; central: C1/C2) as a function of subsequent recall and encoding task. Negativity is plotted down.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows that recalled words elicited a more positive potential (between 500-700 ms over the parietal and central scalp) than words which were not recalled. During the same time interval, a polarity-reversal was found over fronto-temporal areas where recalled words elicited a relatively greater negative potential than not recalled words.

Bottom Line: We assessed whether the subsequent memory effect (SME), an electrophysiological index of successful memory encoding, varies as a function of participants' current mood state.These differences in the scalp topography of the SME suggest that successful recall relies on partially separable neural circuits for good and bad mood states.The results are consistent with theoretical accounts of the interface between emotion and cognition that propose mood-dependent cognitive styles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Ulm, Department of Psychiatry, Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The present research investigated the influencesof emotional mood states on cognitive processes and neural circuits during long-term memory encoding using event-related potentials (ERPs). We assessed whether the subsequent memory effect (SME), an electrophysiological index of successful memory encoding, varies as a function of participants' current mood state. ERPs were recorded while participants in good or bad mood states were presented with words that had to be memorized for subsequent recall. In contrast to participants in bad mood, participants in good mood most frequently applied elaborative encoding styles. At the neurophysiological level, ERP analyses showed that potentials to subsequently recalled words were more positive than to forgotten words at central electrodes in the time interval of 500-650 ms after stimulus onset (SME). At fronto-central electrodes, a polarity-reversed SME was obtained. The strongest modulations of the SME by participants' mood state were obtained at fronto-temporal electrodes. These differences in the scalp topography of the SME suggest that successful recall relies on partially separable neural circuits for good and bad mood states. The results are consistent with theoretical accounts of the interface between emotion and cognition that propose mood-dependent cognitive styles.

No MeSH data available.