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The mechanisms of feature inheritance as predicted by a systems-level model of visual attention and decision making.

Hamker FH - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Bottom Line: We find that the presence of feedback loops alone is sufficient to account for feature inheritance.Although our simulations do not cover all experimental variations and focus only on the general principle, our result appears of specific interest since the model was designed for a completely different purpose than to explain feature inheritance.We suggest that feedback is an important property in visual perception and provide a description of its mechanism and its role in perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Westf.-Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Feature inheritance provides evidence that properties of an invisible target stimulus can be attached to a following mask. We apply a systemslevel model of attention and decision making to explore the influence of memory and feedback connections in feature inheritance. We find that the presence of feedback loops alone is sufficient to account for feature inheritance. Although our simulations do not cover all experimental variations and focus only on the general principle, our result appears of specific interest since the model was designed for a completely different purpose than to explain feature inheritance. We suggest that feedback is an important property in visual perception and provide a description of its mechanism and its role in perception.

No MeSH data available.


We used images of 300x300 pixel in size, where each bar is 26x6 pixel in							size. A target stimulus was presented for 30 ms followed by a mask shown							for 300 ms. After the mask, a blank image was presented to the model.							The relative orientation of the target to the mask was varied (0°, 5°,							10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55°, 60°) to investigate the							dependency of feature inheritance on the similarity in the feature							space.
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Figure 3: We used images of 300x300 pixel in size, where each bar is 26x6 pixel in size. A target stimulus was presented for 30 ms followed by a mask shown for 300 ms. After the mask, a blank image was presented to the model. The relative orientation of the target to the mask was varied (0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55°, 60°) to investigate the dependency of feature inheritance on the similarity in the feature space.

Mentions: We used a similar experimental procedure as Herzog and Koch (2001) . The original sequence of images presented to the model is shown in Figure 3. The target is visible for 30 ms (simulation time) followed by a grating for another 300 ms. After 330 ms the input switches to a gray image, allowing us to simulate the decay of activity as well. It has been earlier suggested that some aspects of masking depend on principles related to the Gestalt (Herzog, Ernst, Etzold, & Eurich, 2003). Since our model does not contain comprehensive algorithms for grouping, we omit simulations with different numbers of bars in the mask and focus primarily on the orientation similarity of the target and the mask. Thus, we varied the relative orientation of the target to the mask using 12 different target orientations (0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55°, 60°).


The mechanisms of feature inheritance as predicted by a systems-level model of visual attention and decision making.

Hamker FH - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

We used images of 300x300 pixel in size, where each bar is 26x6 pixel in							size. A target stimulus was presented for 30 ms followed by a mask shown							for 300 ms. After the mask, a blank image was presented to the model.							The relative orientation of the target to the mask was varied (0°, 5°,							10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55°, 60°) to investigate the							dependency of feature inheritance on the similarity in the feature							space.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864986&req=5

Figure 3: We used images of 300x300 pixel in size, where each bar is 26x6 pixel in size. A target stimulus was presented for 30 ms followed by a mask shown for 300 ms. After the mask, a blank image was presented to the model. The relative orientation of the target to the mask was varied (0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55°, 60°) to investigate the dependency of feature inheritance on the similarity in the feature space.
Mentions: We used a similar experimental procedure as Herzog and Koch (2001) . The original sequence of images presented to the model is shown in Figure 3. The target is visible for 30 ms (simulation time) followed by a grating for another 300 ms. After 330 ms the input switches to a gray image, allowing us to simulate the decay of activity as well. It has been earlier suggested that some aspects of masking depend on principles related to the Gestalt (Herzog, Ernst, Etzold, & Eurich, 2003). Since our model does not contain comprehensive algorithms for grouping, we omit simulations with different numbers of bars in the mask and focus primarily on the orientation similarity of the target and the mask. Thus, we varied the relative orientation of the target to the mask using 12 different target orientations (0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55°, 60°).

Bottom Line: We find that the presence of feedback loops alone is sufficient to account for feature inheritance.Although our simulations do not cover all experimental variations and focus only on the general principle, our result appears of specific interest since the model was designed for a completely different purpose than to explain feature inheritance.We suggest that feedback is an important property in visual perception and provide a description of its mechanism and its role in perception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Westf.-Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Feature inheritance provides evidence that properties of an invisible target stimulus can be attached to a following mask. We apply a systemslevel model of attention and decision making to explore the influence of memory and feedback connections in feature inheritance. We find that the presence of feedback loops alone is sufficient to account for feature inheritance. Although our simulations do not cover all experimental variations and focus only on the general principle, our result appears of specific interest since the model was designed for a completely different purpose than to explain feature inheritance. We suggest that feedback is an important property in visual perception and provide a description of its mechanism and its role in perception.

No MeSH data available.