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The negative compatibility effect: A case for self-inhibition.

Schlaghecken F, Rowley L, Sembi S, Simmons R, Whitcomb D - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Bottom Line: In masked priming, a briefly presented prime stimulus is followed by a mask, which in turn is followed by the task-relevant target.This paper presents new findings indicating that the NCE can be obtained under a wider variety of conditions, suggesting that it reflects more general processes in motor control.In addition, evidence is provided suggesting that prime identification levels in forced choice tasks - usually employed to estimate prime visibility in masked prime tasks - are affected by prior experience with the prime (Exp. 1) as well as by direct motor priming (Exp. 2 & 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.

ABSTRACT
In masked priming, a briefly presented prime stimulus is followed by a mask, which in turn is followed by the task-relevant target. Under certain conditions, negative compatibility effects (NCNCEs) occur, with impaired performance on compatible trials (where prime and target indicate the same response) relative to incompatible trials (where they indicate opposite responses). However, the exact boundary conditions of NCEs, and hence the functional significance of this effect, are still under discussion. In particular, it has been argued that the NCE might be a stimulus-specific phenomenon of little general interest. This paper presents new findings indicating that the NCE can be obtained under a wider variety of conditions, suggesting that it reflects more general processes in motor control. In addition, evidence is provided suggesting that prime identification levels in forced choice tasks - usually employed to estimate prime visibility in masked prime tasks - are affected by prior experience with the prime (Exp. 1) as well as by direct motor priming (Exp. 2 & 3).

No MeSH data available.


Priming effects (incompatible minus compatible) on reaction times (black)							and error rates (white) in Experiment 1.
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Figure 3: Priming effects (incompatible minus compatible) on reaction times (black) and error rates (white) in Experiment 1.

Mentions: Behavioural results from the MP task are presented in Table 1. Reaction times showed neither a main effect of Compatibility nor a main effect of Group, both Fs < 2.3, both ps > .11, but a highly significant interaction between these factors, F(4, 48) = 5.13, MSE = 25.67, p = .002. Follow-up ANOVAs, conducted for each group separately, confirmed that group C produced highly significant NCEs, F(2, 18) = 16.40, MSE = 16.52, p < .001, whereas no significant priming effects were obtained for group A and B, both Fs < 1.8, both ps > .22 (see Figure 3).


The negative compatibility effect: A case for self-inhibition.

Schlaghecken F, Rowley L, Sembi S, Simmons R, Whitcomb D - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Priming effects (incompatible minus compatible) on reaction times (black)							and error rates (white) in Experiment 1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864980&req=5

Figure 3: Priming effects (incompatible minus compatible) on reaction times (black) and error rates (white) in Experiment 1.
Mentions: Behavioural results from the MP task are presented in Table 1. Reaction times showed neither a main effect of Compatibility nor a main effect of Group, both Fs < 2.3, both ps > .11, but a highly significant interaction between these factors, F(4, 48) = 5.13, MSE = 25.67, p = .002. Follow-up ANOVAs, conducted for each group separately, confirmed that group C produced highly significant NCEs, F(2, 18) = 16.40, MSE = 16.52, p < .001, whereas no significant priming effects were obtained for group A and B, both Fs < 1.8, both ps > .22 (see Figure 3).

Bottom Line: In masked priming, a briefly presented prime stimulus is followed by a mask, which in turn is followed by the task-relevant target.This paper presents new findings indicating that the NCE can be obtained under a wider variety of conditions, suggesting that it reflects more general processes in motor control.In addition, evidence is provided suggesting that prime identification levels in forced choice tasks - usually employed to estimate prime visibility in masked prime tasks - are affected by prior experience with the prime (Exp. 1) as well as by direct motor priming (Exp. 2 & 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.

ABSTRACT
In masked priming, a briefly presented prime stimulus is followed by a mask, which in turn is followed by the task-relevant target. Under certain conditions, negative compatibility effects (NCNCEs) occur, with impaired performance on compatible trials (where prime and target indicate the same response) relative to incompatible trials (where they indicate opposite responses). However, the exact boundary conditions of NCEs, and hence the functional significance of this effect, are still under discussion. In particular, it has been argued that the NCE might be a stimulus-specific phenomenon of little general interest. This paper presents new findings indicating that the NCE can be obtained under a wider variety of conditions, suggesting that it reflects more general processes in motor control. In addition, evidence is provided suggesting that prime identification levels in forced choice tasks - usually employed to estimate prime visibility in masked prime tasks - are affected by prior experience with the prime (Exp. 1) as well as by direct motor priming (Exp. 2 & 3).

No MeSH data available.