Limits...
Sensorimotor supremacy: Investigating conscious and unconscious vision by masked priming.

Ansorge U, Neumann O, Becker SI, Kälberer H, Cruse H - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Bottom Line: After the review of the corresponding evidence - so-called masked priming effects - an approach based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis is detailed as to how the question of a unitary mechanism of unconscious vision can be pursued by masked priming studies.In the second part of the report, different models and theories of backward masking and masked priming are reviewed.Types of models based on the sensorimotor hypothesis are discussed that can take into account ways in which sensorimotor processes (reflected in masked priming effects) can affect conscious vision under backward masking conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Universität Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany.

ABSTRACT
According to the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis, conscious perception draws on motor action. In the present report, we will sketch two lines of potential development in the field of masking research based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis. In the first part of the report, evidence is reviewed that masked, invisible stimuli can affect motor responses, attention shifts, and semantic processes. After the review of the corresponding evidence - so-called masked priming effects - an approach based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis is detailed as to how the question of a unitary mechanism of unconscious vision can be pursued by masked priming studies. In the second part of the report, different models and theories of backward masking and masked priming are reviewed. Types of models based on the sensorimotor hypothesis are discussed that can take into account ways in which sensorimotor processes (reflected in masked priming effects) can affect conscious vision under backward masking conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Depicted is a congruent trial, with a masked target-shaped prime (e.g., a							square) on the same side as the visible target shape; procedure after							Klotz and Neumann (1999). Arrows							stand for motion of the fixation dots (toward the screen center). For							details refer to the text.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864969&req=5

Figure 1: Depicted is a congruent trial, with a masked target-shaped prime (e.g., a square) on the same side as the visible target shape; procedure after Klotz and Neumann (1999). Arrows stand for motion of the fixation dots (toward the screen center). For details refer to the text.

Mentions: For an example of the masked priming procedure, take a look at Figure 1, where stimuli and trial details of the study of Klotz and Neumann (1999) are depicted. In each trial of their study, Klotz and Neumann showed their participants a pair of clearly visible geometric figures, a square and a diamond, with one of the figures presented left and the other one right of fixation. These geometric figures served two purposes. First, one of the figures was the target for the responses of the participants (the other figure was a distractor): Half of the participants responded to the position of the square as a target, with a left-hand key press if the square was left and a right-hand key press if the square was right. (These participants had to ignore the diamonds as distractors.) The other half of the participants responded in a corresponding manner to the position of the diamonds (and had to ignore the squares as distractors).


Sensorimotor supremacy: Investigating conscious and unconscious vision by masked priming.

Ansorge U, Neumann O, Becker SI, Kälberer H, Cruse H - Adv Cogn Psychol (2008)

Depicted is a congruent trial, with a masked target-shaped prime (e.g., a							square) on the same side as the visible target shape; procedure after							Klotz and Neumann (1999). Arrows							stand for motion of the fixation dots (toward the screen center). For							details refer to the text.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864969&req=5

Figure 1: Depicted is a congruent trial, with a masked target-shaped prime (e.g., a square) on the same side as the visible target shape; procedure after Klotz and Neumann (1999). Arrows stand for motion of the fixation dots (toward the screen center). For details refer to the text.
Mentions: For an example of the masked priming procedure, take a look at Figure 1, where stimuli and trial details of the study of Klotz and Neumann (1999) are depicted. In each trial of their study, Klotz and Neumann showed their participants a pair of clearly visible geometric figures, a square and a diamond, with one of the figures presented left and the other one right of fixation. These geometric figures served two purposes. First, one of the figures was the target for the responses of the participants (the other figure was a distractor): Half of the participants responded to the position of the square as a target, with a left-hand key press if the square was left and a right-hand key press if the square was right. (These participants had to ignore the diamonds as distractors.) The other half of the participants responded in a corresponding manner to the position of the diamonds (and had to ignore the squares as distractors).

Bottom Line: After the review of the corresponding evidence - so-called masked priming effects - an approach based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis is detailed as to how the question of a unitary mechanism of unconscious vision can be pursued by masked priming studies.In the second part of the report, different models and theories of backward masking and masked priming are reviewed.Types of models based on the sensorimotor hypothesis are discussed that can take into account ways in which sensorimotor processes (reflected in masked priming effects) can affect conscious vision under backward masking conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Universität Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany.

ABSTRACT
According to the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis, conscious perception draws on motor action. In the present report, we will sketch two lines of potential development in the field of masking research based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis. In the first part of the report, evidence is reviewed that masked, invisible stimuli can affect motor responses, attention shifts, and semantic processes. After the review of the corresponding evidence - so-called masked priming effects - an approach based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis is detailed as to how the question of a unitary mechanism of unconscious vision can be pursued by masked priming studies. In the second part of the report, different models and theories of backward masking and masked priming are reviewed. Types of models based on the sensorimotor hypothesis are discussed that can take into account ways in which sensorimotor processes (reflected in masked priming effects) can affect conscious vision under backward masking conditions.

No MeSH data available.