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Student behavior during a school closure caused by pandemic influenza A/H1N1.

Miller JC, Danon L, O'Hagan JJ, Goldstein E, Lajous M, Lipsitch M - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: We sought to improve our understanding of these behaviors.We found significant interaction with the community and other students-though less interaction with other students than during school-with the level of interaction increasing with grade.Our results are useful for the future design of social distancing policies and to improving the ability of modeling studies to accurately predict their impact.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America. joel.c.miller.research@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Many schools were temporarily closed in response to outbreaks of the recently emerged pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus. The effectiveness of closing schools to reduce transmission depends largely on student/family behavior during the closure. We sought to improve our understanding of these behaviors.

Methodology/principal findings: To characterize this behavior, we surveyed students in grades 9-12 and parents of students in grades 5-8 about student activities during a week long closure of a school during the first months after the disease emerged. We found significant interaction with the community and other students-though less interaction with other students than during school-with the level of interaction increasing with grade.

Conclusions: Our results are useful for the future design of social distancing policies and to improving the ability of modeling studies to accurately predict their impact.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Absenteeism by grade in upper and lower school before and after the school closure.Note different vertical axes. The lower school had significantly higher absenteeism. The mean and standard deviation about that mean for the same period of the previous year is shown in solid and dotted lines respectively.
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pone-0010425-g001: Absenteeism by grade in upper and lower school before and after the school closure.Note different vertical axes. The lower school had significantly higher absenteeism. The mean and standard deviation about that mean for the same period of the previous year is shown in solid and dotted lines respectively.

Mentions: Aggregate numbers of absences by grade are shown in Figure 1, except for grade 12, which was involved in an independent study project so those students were not generally present at school. On Monday 18th May, the number of absences increased sharply, with highest absenteeism in the lower school. Tuesday experienced similar levels.


Student behavior during a school closure caused by pandemic influenza A/H1N1.

Miller JC, Danon L, O'Hagan JJ, Goldstein E, Lajous M, Lipsitch M - PLoS ONE (2010)

Absenteeism by grade in upper and lower school before and after the school closure.Note different vertical axes. The lower school had significantly higher absenteeism. The mean and standard deviation about that mean for the same period of the previous year is shown in solid and dotted lines respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864742&req=5

pone-0010425-g001: Absenteeism by grade in upper and lower school before and after the school closure.Note different vertical axes. The lower school had significantly higher absenteeism. The mean and standard deviation about that mean for the same period of the previous year is shown in solid and dotted lines respectively.
Mentions: Aggregate numbers of absences by grade are shown in Figure 1, except for grade 12, which was involved in an independent study project so those students were not generally present at school. On Monday 18th May, the number of absences increased sharply, with highest absenteeism in the lower school. Tuesday experienced similar levels.

Bottom Line: We sought to improve our understanding of these behaviors.We found significant interaction with the community and other students-though less interaction with other students than during school-with the level of interaction increasing with grade.Our results are useful for the future design of social distancing policies and to improving the ability of modeling studies to accurately predict their impact.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America. joel.c.miller.research@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Many schools were temporarily closed in response to outbreaks of the recently emerged pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus. The effectiveness of closing schools to reduce transmission depends largely on student/family behavior during the closure. We sought to improve our understanding of these behaviors.

Methodology/principal findings: To characterize this behavior, we surveyed students in grades 9-12 and parents of students in grades 5-8 about student activities during a week long closure of a school during the first months after the disease emerged. We found significant interaction with the community and other students-though less interaction with other students than during school-with the level of interaction increasing with grade.

Conclusions: Our results are useful for the future design of social distancing policies and to improving the ability of modeling studies to accurately predict their impact.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus