Limits...
Use of local anaesthetics and adjuncts for spinal and epidural anaesthesia and analgesia at German and Austrian University Hospitals: an online survey to assess current standard practice.

Wahlen BM, Roewer N, Kranke P - BMC Anesthesiol (2010)

Bottom Line: Similarly to the use of drugs in major urological and gynaecological operations a wide range of drugs and adjuncts is used in epidural anaesthesia in caesarean section and spontaneous delivery.Our results indicate a certain agreement in short operations in spinal anaesthesia.By contrast, a large variety concerning the anaesthesiological approach in larger operations as well as in epidural analgesia in obstetrics could be revealed, the causes of which are assumed to be primarily rooted in particular departmental structures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Staff Anaesthesiologist, University of Wuerzburg, Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Wuerzburg, Germany. wahlen_b@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: The present anonymous multicenter online survey was conducted to evaluate the application of regional anaesthesia techniques as well as the used local anaesthetics and adjuncts at German and Austrian university hospitals.

Methods: 39 university hospitals were requested to fill in an online questionnaire, to determine the kind of regional anaesthesia and preferred drugs in urology, obstetrics and gynaecology.

Results: 33 hospitals responded. No regional anaesthesia is conducted in 47% of the minor gynaecological and 44% of the urological operations; plain bupivacaine 0.5% is used in 38% and 47% respectively. In transurethral resections of the prostate and bladder no regional anaesthesia is used in 3% of the responding hospitals, whereas plain bupivacaine 0.5% is used in more than 90%. Regional anaesthesia is only used in selected major gynaecological and urological operations. On the contrary to the smaller operations, the survey revealed a large variety of used drugs and mixtures. Almost 80% prefer plain bupivacaine or ropivacaine 0.5% in spinal anaesthesia in caesarean section. Similarly to the use of drugs in major urological and gynaecological operations a wide range of drugs and adjuncts is used in epidural anaesthesia in caesarean section and spontaneous delivery.

Conclusions: Our results indicate a certain agreement in short operations in spinal anaesthesia. By contrast, a large variety concerning the anaesthesiological approach in larger operations as well as in epidural analgesia in obstetrics could be revealed, the causes of which are assumed to be primarily rooted in particular departmental structures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Urological operations < 2 hours (n = 33).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864275&req=5

Figure 1: Urological operations < 2 hours (n = 33).

Mentions: In short urological procedures almost half of the respondent departments stated that they do not use regional anaesthesia techniques. Only a small number of participants use short-acting local anaesthetics (i.e. mepivacaine), while the majority, in case of performing central neuraxial regional anaesthesia, prefer a spinal anaesthesia with bupivacaine 0.5% (Figure 1).


Use of local anaesthetics and adjuncts for spinal and epidural anaesthesia and analgesia at German and Austrian University Hospitals: an online survey to assess current standard practice.

Wahlen BM, Roewer N, Kranke P - BMC Anesthesiol (2010)

Urological operations < 2 hours (n = 33).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2864275&req=5

Figure 1: Urological operations < 2 hours (n = 33).
Mentions: In short urological procedures almost half of the respondent departments stated that they do not use regional anaesthesia techniques. Only a small number of participants use short-acting local anaesthetics (i.e. mepivacaine), while the majority, in case of performing central neuraxial regional anaesthesia, prefer a spinal anaesthesia with bupivacaine 0.5% (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Similarly to the use of drugs in major urological and gynaecological operations a wide range of drugs and adjuncts is used in epidural anaesthesia in caesarean section and spontaneous delivery.Our results indicate a certain agreement in short operations in spinal anaesthesia.By contrast, a large variety concerning the anaesthesiological approach in larger operations as well as in epidural analgesia in obstetrics could be revealed, the causes of which are assumed to be primarily rooted in particular departmental structures.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Staff Anaesthesiologist, University of Wuerzburg, Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Wuerzburg, Germany. wahlen_b@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: The present anonymous multicenter online survey was conducted to evaluate the application of regional anaesthesia techniques as well as the used local anaesthetics and adjuncts at German and Austrian university hospitals.

Methods: 39 university hospitals were requested to fill in an online questionnaire, to determine the kind of regional anaesthesia and preferred drugs in urology, obstetrics and gynaecology.

Results: 33 hospitals responded. No regional anaesthesia is conducted in 47% of the minor gynaecological and 44% of the urological operations; plain bupivacaine 0.5% is used in 38% and 47% respectively. In transurethral resections of the prostate and bladder no regional anaesthesia is used in 3% of the responding hospitals, whereas plain bupivacaine 0.5% is used in more than 90%. Regional anaesthesia is only used in selected major gynaecological and urological operations. On the contrary to the smaller operations, the survey revealed a large variety of used drugs and mixtures. Almost 80% prefer plain bupivacaine or ropivacaine 0.5% in spinal anaesthesia in caesarean section. Similarly to the use of drugs in major urological and gynaecological operations a wide range of drugs and adjuncts is used in epidural anaesthesia in caesarean section and spontaneous delivery.

Conclusions: Our results indicate a certain agreement in short operations in spinal anaesthesia. By contrast, a large variety concerning the anaesthesiological approach in larger operations as well as in epidural analgesia in obstetrics could be revealed, the causes of which are assumed to be primarily rooted in particular departmental structures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus