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Infestation of an owl (Bubo bubo) with Lucilia spp.

Pirali-Kheirabadi K, Cheraghchi-Bashi M, Navidpour S - Comp Clin Path (2009)

Bottom Line: This disease rarely effects birds especially owls.The wound was infested with 40 white conical maggots, 3-9 mm in length, which led to a diagnosis of myiasis in the owl.According to key diagnostic features for maggots in birds, the larvae were identified as Lucilia sericata and Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Myiasis is an infestation of tissue with the larval stage of dipterous flies. This condition mostly affects the skin but may also occur in certain body cavities. It can occur in either animals or humans and is caused by parasitic dipterous fly larvae feeding on the host's necrotic or living tissue. This disease rarely effects birds especially owls. In this study, infestation of an owl with cutaneous myiasis is reported. In October 2008, a wounded owl was referred by the environmental department of Chaharmahal-Bakhtiary province to the clinic of veterinary science at Shahrekord University in west central Iran. At the initial examination, clinical signs were extensive with a wound under the right wing. The wound was infested with 40 white conical maggots, 3-9 mm in length, which led to a diagnosis of myiasis in the owl. The maggots were carefully collected from the wound using sterile forceps and were kept in 70% ethanol and transferred to the laboratory of parasitology where the diagnosis was undertaken by the observation of posterior and anterior spiracle and cephalopharyngeal apparatus. According to key diagnostic features for maggots in birds, the larvae were identified as Lucilia sericata and Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae). The wound was treated using usual acaricides, but due to the severity of the infestation and because of the delay in referring the animal to the clinic, it died 3 days post-treatment. This is the first report in Iran of an infestation of the Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo) with L. sericata and L. cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Spines on the surface of larvae L. sericata
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Fig5: Spines on the surface of larvae L. sericata

Mentions: A young male Eurasian eagle owl was referred to the clinic of veterinary science at Shahrekord University by the environmental department of Chaharmahal–Bakhtiary province (west central Iran) for treatment (Fig. 1). A clinical examination was performed and fly larvae were observed under the right wing of the owl (Fig. 2). The owl was treated with single-dose ivermectine 0.006 μg/kg (intramuscular (IM)—Ivectin®; Lab. Razak Co. Ltd.) and lincomycin+spectinomycin 0.1 μg/kg, (IM—Lincopec®; Virbac Lab. Razak Co. Ltd.) as well as manual removal of the larvae followed by a local dressing. The bird was kept in the clinic; however, due to the severity of the infestation, it had to be euthanized. The larvae were collected, fixed in 70% alcohol, and observed using a stereo microscope (Olympus CX41, Japan). Based on their length, the morphology of anterior and posterior spiracles and cephalopharyngeal apparatus, the color of the maggots, and the spines on the surface of the larvae, the larvae were classified as L. sericata and L. cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) (Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). We used the same morphological characteristics for identifying L. sericata and L. cuprina as Spradbery used in 1991 (Spradbery 1991).Fig. 1


Infestation of an owl (Bubo bubo) with Lucilia spp.

Pirali-Kheirabadi K, Cheraghchi-Bashi M, Navidpour S - Comp Clin Path (2009)

Spines on the surface of larvae L. sericata
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2837235&req=5

Fig5: Spines on the surface of larvae L. sericata
Mentions: A young male Eurasian eagle owl was referred to the clinic of veterinary science at Shahrekord University by the environmental department of Chaharmahal–Bakhtiary province (west central Iran) for treatment (Fig. 1). A clinical examination was performed and fly larvae were observed under the right wing of the owl (Fig. 2). The owl was treated with single-dose ivermectine 0.006 μg/kg (intramuscular (IM)—Ivectin®; Lab. Razak Co. Ltd.) and lincomycin+spectinomycin 0.1 μg/kg, (IM—Lincopec®; Virbac Lab. Razak Co. Ltd.) as well as manual removal of the larvae followed by a local dressing. The bird was kept in the clinic; however, due to the severity of the infestation, it had to be euthanized. The larvae were collected, fixed in 70% alcohol, and observed using a stereo microscope (Olympus CX41, Japan). Based on their length, the morphology of anterior and posterior spiracles and cephalopharyngeal apparatus, the color of the maggots, and the spines on the surface of the larvae, the larvae were classified as L. sericata and L. cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae) (Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). We used the same morphological characteristics for identifying L. sericata and L. cuprina as Spradbery used in 1991 (Spradbery 1991).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: This disease rarely effects birds especially owls.The wound was infested with 40 white conical maggots, 3-9 mm in length, which led to a diagnosis of myiasis in the owl.According to key diagnostic features for maggots in birds, the larvae were identified as Lucilia sericata and Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Myiasis is an infestation of tissue with the larval stage of dipterous flies. This condition mostly affects the skin but may also occur in certain body cavities. It can occur in either animals or humans and is caused by parasitic dipterous fly larvae feeding on the host's necrotic or living tissue. This disease rarely effects birds especially owls. In this study, infestation of an owl with cutaneous myiasis is reported. In October 2008, a wounded owl was referred by the environmental department of Chaharmahal-Bakhtiary province to the clinic of veterinary science at Shahrekord University in west central Iran. At the initial examination, clinical signs were extensive with a wound under the right wing. The wound was infested with 40 white conical maggots, 3-9 mm in length, which led to a diagnosis of myiasis in the owl. The maggots were carefully collected from the wound using sterile forceps and were kept in 70% ethanol and transferred to the laboratory of parasitology where the diagnosis was undertaken by the observation of posterior and anterior spiracle and cephalopharyngeal apparatus. According to key diagnostic features for maggots in birds, the larvae were identified as Lucilia sericata and Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae). The wound was treated using usual acaricides, but due to the severity of the infestation and because of the delay in referring the animal to the clinic, it died 3 days post-treatment. This is the first report in Iran of an infestation of the Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo) with L. sericata and L. cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus