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A Rare Cause for Cervical Pain: Eagle's Syndrome.

Politi M, Toro C, Tenani G - Int J Dent (2008)

Bottom Line: It is characterized by pharyngodynia localized in the tonsillar fossa and sometimes accompanied by disphagia, odynophagia, foreign body sensation, and temporary voice changes.In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus compresses the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibers, resulting in a persistent pain irradiating in the carotid territory.The pathogenesis of the syndrome is still under discussion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, "S. Maria della Misericordia" University Hospital, 33100 Udine, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Patients with pharyngodynia and neck pain symptoms can lead to an extensive differential diagnosis. Eagle's syndrome must be taken in account. Eagle defined "stylalgia" as an autonomous entity related to abnormal length of the styloid process or to mineralization of the stylohyoid ligament complex. The stylohyoid complex derives from Reichert's cartilage of the second branchial arch. The styloyd process is an elongated conical projection of the temporal bone that lies anteriorly to the mastoid process. The incidence of Eagle's syndrome varies among population. Usually asymptomatic, it occurs in adult patients. It is characterized by pharyngodynia localized in the tonsillar fossa and sometimes accompanied by disphagia, odynophagia, foreign body sensation, and temporary voice changes. In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus compresses the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibers, resulting in a persistent pain irradiating in the carotid territory. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is still under discussion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

intraoperative view of thesurgical field. The distal third of the styloid process is completely exposed.
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fig2: intraoperative view of thesurgical field. The distal third of the styloid process is completely exposed.

Mentions: A 42-year-oldfemale came to our Institution to evaluate pharyngodynia and foreign body sensation at theright sight of the throat for over 1 year. The patient was very compliant, andduring the oropharingeal examination an elongated styloid process could bepalpated intraorally posterior to the right tonsillar fossa. Palpation elicitedpainful sensation. The Orthopantomography showed the elongation of the rightstyloid process. For a complete study of the case, CT scans were taken forbetter defining length, angulation, and anatomical relationships of the styloidprocess. CT scans revealed a 3, 1 cm in length right styloid process (Figure 1). Adiagnosis of Eagle's classic styloid syndrome was made and an intraoralsurgical treatment under general anesthesia was planned. During the surgicalprocedure the tip of the styloid process was identified by palpation. Due to the retruded position to the right tonsillar fossa, thetonsillectomy was not planned. The muscles of the pharyngeal wall weredissected, separated, and retracted. Then, an incision was made on theperiosteum at the tip of the styloid process. The periosteum was stripped fromthe tip and the styloid process was exposed (Figure 2). 1 cm of his caudal part wasexcised (Figure 3) and the pharyngeal wall was sutured. Tonsillectomy was notrequired and haemorrhage did not occur. Amoxicillin was administered oncepreoperatively and once postoperatively. The patient was discharged onpostoperative day 2. 1 year aftersurgery, the patient was symptom-free.


A Rare Cause for Cervical Pain: Eagle's Syndrome.

Politi M, Toro C, Tenani G - Int J Dent (2008)

intraoperative view of thesurgical field. The distal third of the styloid process is completely exposed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2836894&req=5

fig2: intraoperative view of thesurgical field. The distal third of the styloid process is completely exposed.
Mentions: A 42-year-oldfemale came to our Institution to evaluate pharyngodynia and foreign body sensation at theright sight of the throat for over 1 year. The patient was very compliant, andduring the oropharingeal examination an elongated styloid process could bepalpated intraorally posterior to the right tonsillar fossa. Palpation elicitedpainful sensation. The Orthopantomography showed the elongation of the rightstyloid process. For a complete study of the case, CT scans were taken forbetter defining length, angulation, and anatomical relationships of the styloidprocess. CT scans revealed a 3, 1 cm in length right styloid process (Figure 1). Adiagnosis of Eagle's classic styloid syndrome was made and an intraoralsurgical treatment under general anesthesia was planned. During the surgicalprocedure the tip of the styloid process was identified by palpation. Due to the retruded position to the right tonsillar fossa, thetonsillectomy was not planned. The muscles of the pharyngeal wall weredissected, separated, and retracted. Then, an incision was made on theperiosteum at the tip of the styloid process. The periosteum was stripped fromthe tip and the styloid process was exposed (Figure 2). 1 cm of his caudal part wasexcised (Figure 3) and the pharyngeal wall was sutured. Tonsillectomy was notrequired and haemorrhage did not occur. Amoxicillin was administered oncepreoperatively and once postoperatively. The patient was discharged onpostoperative day 2. 1 year aftersurgery, the patient was symptom-free.

Bottom Line: It is characterized by pharyngodynia localized in the tonsillar fossa and sometimes accompanied by disphagia, odynophagia, foreign body sensation, and temporary voice changes.In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus compresses the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibers, resulting in a persistent pain irradiating in the carotid territory.The pathogenesis of the syndrome is still under discussion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, "S. Maria della Misericordia" University Hospital, 33100 Udine, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Patients with pharyngodynia and neck pain symptoms can lead to an extensive differential diagnosis. Eagle's syndrome must be taken in account. Eagle defined "stylalgia" as an autonomous entity related to abnormal length of the styloid process or to mineralization of the stylohyoid ligament complex. The stylohyoid complex derives from Reichert's cartilage of the second branchial arch. The styloyd process is an elongated conical projection of the temporal bone that lies anteriorly to the mastoid process. The incidence of Eagle's syndrome varies among population. Usually asymptomatic, it occurs in adult patients. It is characterized by pharyngodynia localized in the tonsillar fossa and sometimes accompanied by disphagia, odynophagia, foreign body sensation, and temporary voice changes. In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus compresses the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibers, resulting in a persistent pain irradiating in the carotid territory. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is still under discussion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus