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Training top-down attention improves performance on a triple-conjunction search task.

Baluch F, Baluchg F, Itti L - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: Training has been shown to improve perceptual performance on limited sets of stimuli.However, whether training can generally improve top-down biasing of visual search in a target-nonspecific manner remains unknown.Subjects became experts at this task, with twofold increased performance, decreased fixation duration, and stronger tendency to guide gaze toward items with color and spatial frequency (but not necessarily orientation) that resembled the target, suggesting improved general top-down biasing of search.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
Training has been shown to improve perceptual performance on limited sets of stimuli. However, whether training can generally improve top-down biasing of visual search in a target-nonspecific manner remains unknown. We trained subjects over ten days on a visual search task, challenging them with a novel target (top-down goal) on every trial, while bottom-up uncertainty (distribution of distractors) remained constant. We analyzed the changes in saccade statistics and visual behavior over the course of training by recording eye movements as subjects performed the task. Subjects became experts at this task, with twofold increased performance, decreased fixation duration, and stronger tendency to guide gaze toward items with color and spatial frequency (but not necessarily orientation) that resembled the target, suggesting improved general top-down biasing of search.

Show MeSH
Single feature correlations.Feature similarity maps are shown on the left with hot colors showing high similarity. These similarity maps are correlated with saccade maps to yield a correlation value . The plot shows mean correlations per session for each feature. Error bars are SEM.
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pone-0009127-g005: Single feature correlations.Feature similarity maps are shown on the left with hot colors showing high similarity. These similarity maps are correlated with saccade maps to yield a correlation value . The plot shows mean correlations per session for each feature. Error bars are SEM.

Mentions: Having constructed feature similarity maps and binary saccade maps, a correlation value between the binary saccade map and each of the feature correlations maps were computed for each trial. Correlation values for each session were computed by pooling together trials of all subjects within a session and then computing the mean. Figure 5 shows that, i) feature similarity maps and binary saccade maps are correlated, and ii) hue and frequency similarity maps become increasingly correlated as the sessions progress, however, no such trend can be observed for orientation. The positive trend indicates correlations between non-zero values in the binary saccade map with high values in the feature similarity maps. This demonstrates a higher likelihood of subjects making saccades towards items that are similar to the target.


Training top-down attention improves performance on a triple-conjunction search task.

Baluch F, Baluchg F, Itti L - PLoS ONE (2010)

Single feature correlations.Feature similarity maps are shown on the left with hot colors showing high similarity. These similarity maps are correlated with saccade maps to yield a correlation value . The plot shows mean correlations per session for each feature. Error bars are SEM.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2823769&req=5

pone-0009127-g005: Single feature correlations.Feature similarity maps are shown on the left with hot colors showing high similarity. These similarity maps are correlated with saccade maps to yield a correlation value . The plot shows mean correlations per session for each feature. Error bars are SEM.
Mentions: Having constructed feature similarity maps and binary saccade maps, a correlation value between the binary saccade map and each of the feature correlations maps were computed for each trial. Correlation values for each session were computed by pooling together trials of all subjects within a session and then computing the mean. Figure 5 shows that, i) feature similarity maps and binary saccade maps are correlated, and ii) hue and frequency similarity maps become increasingly correlated as the sessions progress, however, no such trend can be observed for orientation. The positive trend indicates correlations between non-zero values in the binary saccade map with high values in the feature similarity maps. This demonstrates a higher likelihood of subjects making saccades towards items that are similar to the target.

Bottom Line: Training has been shown to improve perceptual performance on limited sets of stimuli.However, whether training can generally improve top-down biasing of visual search in a target-nonspecific manner remains unknown.Subjects became experts at this task, with twofold increased performance, decreased fixation duration, and stronger tendency to guide gaze toward items with color and spatial frequency (but not necessarily orientation) that resembled the target, suggesting improved general top-down biasing of search.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
Training has been shown to improve perceptual performance on limited sets of stimuli. However, whether training can generally improve top-down biasing of visual search in a target-nonspecific manner remains unknown. We trained subjects over ten days on a visual search task, challenging them with a novel target (top-down goal) on every trial, while bottom-up uncertainty (distribution of distractors) remained constant. We analyzed the changes in saccade statistics and visual behavior over the course of training by recording eye movements as subjects performed the task. Subjects became experts at this task, with twofold increased performance, decreased fixation duration, and stronger tendency to guide gaze toward items with color and spatial frequency (but not necessarily orientation) that resembled the target, suggesting improved general top-down biasing of search.

Show MeSH