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Training top-down attention improves performance on a triple-conjunction search task.

Baluch F, Baluchg F, Itti L - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: Training has been shown to improve perceptual performance on limited sets of stimuli.However, whether training can generally improve top-down biasing of visual search in a target-nonspecific manner remains unknown.Subjects became experts at this task, with twofold increased performance, decreased fixation duration, and stronger tendency to guide gaze toward items with color and spatial frequency (but not necessarily orientation) that resembled the target, suggesting improved general top-down biasing of search.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
Training has been shown to improve perceptual performance on limited sets of stimuli. However, whether training can generally improve top-down biasing of visual search in a target-nonspecific manner remains unknown. We trained subjects over ten days on a visual search task, challenging them with a novel target (top-down goal) on every trial, while bottom-up uncertainty (distribution of distractors) remained constant. We analyzed the changes in saccade statistics and visual behavior over the course of training by recording eye movements as subjects performed the task. Subjects became experts at this task, with twofold increased performance, decreased fixation duration, and stronger tendency to guide gaze toward items with color and spatial frequency (but not necessarily orientation) that resembled the target, suggesting improved general top-down biasing of search.

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Performance results.Mean percentage correct performance obtained by taking a mean across subjects for each of the 10 sessions. Error bars are SEM across subjects. Smooth curve is a fit to a logistic function ().
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pone-0009127-g002: Performance results.Mean percentage correct performance obtained by taking a mean across subjects for each of the 10 sessions. Error bars are SEM across subjects. Smooth curve is a fit to a logistic function ().

Mentions: Measuring performance as the percentage of correct trials for each 100-trial session, we found that subjects showed improved performance over the course of the trials (figure 2). The mean percentage performance of the group was computed by taking an average of the percentage correct responses by each of the five subjects for each session. A one-way ANOVA showed an effect of session on mean performance (F(9,40) = 6.88 ). The change in performance measured by the slope (indicative of learning rate) of the logistic fit on the data halfs at day five and later levels off, hovering around to correct as shown in figure 2.


Training top-down attention improves performance on a triple-conjunction search task.

Baluch F, Baluchg F, Itti L - PLoS ONE (2010)

Performance results.Mean percentage correct performance obtained by taking a mean across subjects for each of the 10 sessions. Error bars are SEM across subjects. Smooth curve is a fit to a logistic function ().
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2823769&req=5

pone-0009127-g002: Performance results.Mean percentage correct performance obtained by taking a mean across subjects for each of the 10 sessions. Error bars are SEM across subjects. Smooth curve is a fit to a logistic function ().
Mentions: Measuring performance as the percentage of correct trials for each 100-trial session, we found that subjects showed improved performance over the course of the trials (figure 2). The mean percentage performance of the group was computed by taking an average of the percentage correct responses by each of the five subjects for each session. A one-way ANOVA showed an effect of session on mean performance (F(9,40) = 6.88 ). The change in performance measured by the slope (indicative of learning rate) of the logistic fit on the data halfs at day five and later levels off, hovering around to correct as shown in figure 2.

Bottom Line: Training has been shown to improve perceptual performance on limited sets of stimuli.However, whether training can generally improve top-down biasing of visual search in a target-nonspecific manner remains unknown.Subjects became experts at this task, with twofold increased performance, decreased fixation duration, and stronger tendency to guide gaze toward items with color and spatial frequency (but not necessarily orientation) that resembled the target, suggesting improved general top-down biasing of search.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
Training has been shown to improve perceptual performance on limited sets of stimuli. However, whether training can generally improve top-down biasing of visual search in a target-nonspecific manner remains unknown. We trained subjects over ten days on a visual search task, challenging them with a novel target (top-down goal) on every trial, while bottom-up uncertainty (distribution of distractors) remained constant. We analyzed the changes in saccade statistics and visual behavior over the course of training by recording eye movements as subjects performed the task. Subjects became experts at this task, with twofold increased performance, decreased fixation duration, and stronger tendency to guide gaze toward items with color and spatial frequency (but not necessarily orientation) that resembled the target, suggesting improved general top-down biasing of search.

Show MeSH