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Hemangiopericytoma in the sacrococcygeal space: a case report.

Kitahata Y, Yokoyama S, Takifuji K, Hotta T, Matsuda K, Tominaga T, Oku Y, Watanabe T, Ieda J, Yamaue H - J Med Case Rep (2010)

Bottom Line: A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with a palpable tumor on the left side of her anus.Preoperative imaging indicated that the tumor was in the sacrococcygeal space without invasion of other organs.A complete resection was performed via a parasacral incision.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Department of Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, Kimiidera, Wakayama, 641-8510, Japan. yokoyama@wakayama-med.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A hemangiopericytoma is a rare, soft-tissue tumor of vascular origin derived from a pericyte of Zimmerman, which is a modified smooth muscle cell that surrounds the small blood vessels. Hemangiopericytomas can occur wherever there are vascular capillaries. However, there are no previous reports of a hemangiopericytoma in the sacrococcygeal space.

Case presentation: We describe the first reported case of a hemangiopericytoma found in the sacrococcygeal space. A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with a palpable tumor on the left side of her anus. Preoperative imaging indicated that the tumor was in the sacrococcygeal space without invasion of other organs. A complete resection was performed via a parasacral incision. The histological and immunohistochemical staining patterns supported the diagnosis of a hemangiopericytoma.

Conclusion: A complete resection without piecemeal excision is the best way to treat a hemangiopericytoma. Recognizing the presence of a hemangiopericytoma in the sacrococcygeal space requires appropriate surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Computed tomography scan showing a large mass in the sacrococcygeal space. (B) Magnetic resonance imaging scan showing heterogeneous high intensity in the outer layer and extremely high intensity in the central layer in T2-weighted image.
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Figure 1: (A) Computed tomography scan showing a large mass in the sacrococcygeal space. (B) Magnetic resonance imaging scan showing heterogeneous high intensity in the outer layer and extremely high intensity in the central layer in T2-weighted image.

Mentions: A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with a palpable tumor on the left side of her anus. The tumor was elastic and hard and had a smooth surface. She had no pain or tenderness associated with the lesion, and no other clinical symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed a mass in the sacrococcygeal space with a smooth surface and no invasion to the rectum (Figure 1A). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the outer layer was heterogeneous with high intensity, and that the central layer had an extremely high intensity in T2-weighted images, indicating that the inside of the mass had a rich blood flow (Figure 1B). Rectoscopy revealed that the mucosal surface was intact, and an endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) demonstrated that the tumor was not derived from the rectum. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) showed that the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at the area was 2.64. The expected SUV is 1.80 to 1.42 in benign soft tissue masses, and 4.20 to 3.16 in malignant soft tissue masses [5].


Hemangiopericytoma in the sacrococcygeal space: a case report.

Kitahata Y, Yokoyama S, Takifuji K, Hotta T, Matsuda K, Tominaga T, Oku Y, Watanabe T, Ieda J, Yamaue H - J Med Case Rep (2010)

(A) Computed tomography scan showing a large mass in the sacrococcygeal space. (B) Magnetic resonance imaging scan showing heterogeneous high intensity in the outer layer and extremely high intensity in the central layer in T2-weighted image.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2823763&req=5

Figure 1: (A) Computed tomography scan showing a large mass in the sacrococcygeal space. (B) Magnetic resonance imaging scan showing heterogeneous high intensity in the outer layer and extremely high intensity in the central layer in T2-weighted image.
Mentions: A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with a palpable tumor on the left side of her anus. The tumor was elastic and hard and had a smooth surface. She had no pain or tenderness associated with the lesion, and no other clinical symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed a mass in the sacrococcygeal space with a smooth surface and no invasion to the rectum (Figure 1A). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the outer layer was heterogeneous with high intensity, and that the central layer had an extremely high intensity in T2-weighted images, indicating that the inside of the mass had a rich blood flow (Figure 1B). Rectoscopy revealed that the mucosal surface was intact, and an endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) demonstrated that the tumor was not derived from the rectum. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) showed that the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at the area was 2.64. The expected SUV is 1.80 to 1.42 in benign soft tissue masses, and 4.20 to 3.16 in malignant soft tissue masses [5].

Bottom Line: A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with a palpable tumor on the left side of her anus.Preoperative imaging indicated that the tumor was in the sacrococcygeal space without invasion of other organs.A complete resection was performed via a parasacral incision.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Second Department of Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, Kimiidera, Wakayama, 641-8510, Japan. yokoyama@wakayama-med.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A hemangiopericytoma is a rare, soft-tissue tumor of vascular origin derived from a pericyte of Zimmerman, which is a modified smooth muscle cell that surrounds the small blood vessels. Hemangiopericytomas can occur wherever there are vascular capillaries. However, there are no previous reports of a hemangiopericytoma in the sacrococcygeal space.

Case presentation: We describe the first reported case of a hemangiopericytoma found in the sacrococcygeal space. A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with a palpable tumor on the left side of her anus. Preoperative imaging indicated that the tumor was in the sacrococcygeal space without invasion of other organs. A complete resection was performed via a parasacral incision. The histological and immunohistochemical staining patterns supported the diagnosis of a hemangiopericytoma.

Conclusion: A complete resection without piecemeal excision is the best way to treat a hemangiopericytoma. Recognizing the presence of a hemangiopericytoma in the sacrococcygeal space requires appropriate surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus