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Chicken blood provides a suitable meal for the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis and does not inhibit Leishmania development in the gut.

Sant'anna MR, Nascimento A, Alexander B, Dilger E, Cavalcante RR, Diaz-Albiter HM, Bates PA, Dillon RJ - Parasit Vectors (2010)

Bottom Line: This indicated that Lu. longipalpis were able to concentrate bloodmeals taken from different hosts using prediuresis and this was confirmed by direct observation.Sand flies fed on chickens or dogs produced significantly more eggs than those fed on human blood.The results of this study help to define the role that chickens play in the epidemiology of leishmaniasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK. r.j.dillon@liv.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to address the role of chickens as bloodmeal sources for female Lutzomyia longipalpis and to test whether chicken blood is harmful to Leishmania parasite development within the sand flies. Bloodmeal ingestion, excretion of urate, reproduction, fecundity, as well as Leishmania infection and development were compared in sand flies fed on blood from chickens and different mammalian sources.

Results: Large differences in haemoglobin and protein concentrations in whole blood (dog>human>rabbit> chicken) did not correlate with differences in bloodmeal protein concentrations (dog = chicken>human>rabbit). This indicated that Lu. longipalpis were able to concentrate bloodmeals taken from different hosts using prediuresis and this was confirmed by direct observation. Sand flies fed on chickens or dogs produced significantly more eggs than those fed on human blood. Female Lu. longipalpis retained significantly more urate inside their bodies when fed on chicken blood compared to those fed on rabbit blood. However, when the amounts of urate excreted after feeding were measured, sand flies fed on rabbit blood excreted significantly more than those fed on chicken blood. There was no difference in female longevity after feeding on avian or mammalian blood.Sand flies infected via chicken blood produced Leishmania mexicana infections with a similar developmental pattern but higher overall parasite populations than sand flies infected via rabbit blood.

Conclusions: The results of this study help to define the role that chickens play in the epidemiology of leishmaniasis. The present study using a Lu. longipalpis/L. mexicana model indicates that chickens are suitable hosts to support a Lu. longipalpis population and that chicken blood is likely to support the development of transmissible Leishmania infections in Lu. longipalpis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of parasites in the midgut of sand flies infected with chicken and rabbit blood. Mean number of parasites per sand fly gut at 2 day intervals post infection via rabbit or chicken blood (5 independent experiments). * represents statistical significance between chicken fed and rabbit fed at 6 days, P ≤ 0.0138 (U Mann-Whitney).
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Figure 3: Number of parasites in the midgut of sand flies infected with chicken and rabbit blood. Mean number of parasites per sand fly gut at 2 day intervals post infection via rabbit or chicken blood (5 independent experiments). * represents statistical significance between chicken fed and rabbit fed at 6 days, P ≤ 0.0138 (U Mann-Whitney).

Mentions: Comparison of Leishmania infection of sand flies via chicken or rabbit blood suggested that chicken blood was a good medium for establishing infections of L. mexicana in Lu. longipalpis. Feeding an amastigote infected chicken bloodmeal produced a consistently high (from 82.1 to 95.7%) percentage infection among the sand flies in comparison to the percentage infected amongst the rabbit blood fed group up to 6 days post-infection (Table 2). There was a trend towards higher numbers of parasites observed in sand flies given an infection via chicken blood compared to rabbit blood fed sand flies (Fig. 3), and 6 days after infection the number of parasites found in sand flies infected with chicken blood was significantly higher than in flies infected with rabbit blood (U Mann-Whitney, P ≤ 0.0138). This data is in accordance with the observations of Nieves and Pimenta [34] in Lutzomyia migonei. A higher parasite count in sand flies infected via chicken blood is of particular interest as the number of parasites is important to the transmission potential, for example contributing to the construction of the PSG plug [35] and number of infective forms.


Chicken blood provides a suitable meal for the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis and does not inhibit Leishmania development in the gut.

Sant'anna MR, Nascimento A, Alexander B, Dilger E, Cavalcante RR, Diaz-Albiter HM, Bates PA, Dillon RJ - Parasit Vectors (2010)

Number of parasites in the midgut of sand flies infected with chicken and rabbit blood. Mean number of parasites per sand fly gut at 2 day intervals post infection via rabbit or chicken blood (5 independent experiments). * represents statistical significance between chicken fed and rabbit fed at 6 days, P ≤ 0.0138 (U Mann-Whitney).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2823724&req=5

Figure 3: Number of parasites in the midgut of sand flies infected with chicken and rabbit blood. Mean number of parasites per sand fly gut at 2 day intervals post infection via rabbit or chicken blood (5 independent experiments). * represents statistical significance between chicken fed and rabbit fed at 6 days, P ≤ 0.0138 (U Mann-Whitney).
Mentions: Comparison of Leishmania infection of sand flies via chicken or rabbit blood suggested that chicken blood was a good medium for establishing infections of L. mexicana in Lu. longipalpis. Feeding an amastigote infected chicken bloodmeal produced a consistently high (from 82.1 to 95.7%) percentage infection among the sand flies in comparison to the percentage infected amongst the rabbit blood fed group up to 6 days post-infection (Table 2). There was a trend towards higher numbers of parasites observed in sand flies given an infection via chicken blood compared to rabbit blood fed sand flies (Fig. 3), and 6 days after infection the number of parasites found in sand flies infected with chicken blood was significantly higher than in flies infected with rabbit blood (U Mann-Whitney, P ≤ 0.0138). This data is in accordance with the observations of Nieves and Pimenta [34] in Lutzomyia migonei. A higher parasite count in sand flies infected via chicken blood is of particular interest as the number of parasites is important to the transmission potential, for example contributing to the construction of the PSG plug [35] and number of infective forms.

Bottom Line: This indicated that Lu. longipalpis were able to concentrate bloodmeals taken from different hosts using prediuresis and this was confirmed by direct observation.Sand flies fed on chickens or dogs produced significantly more eggs than those fed on human blood.The results of this study help to define the role that chickens play in the epidemiology of leishmaniasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK. r.j.dillon@liv.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to address the role of chickens as bloodmeal sources for female Lutzomyia longipalpis and to test whether chicken blood is harmful to Leishmania parasite development within the sand flies. Bloodmeal ingestion, excretion of urate, reproduction, fecundity, as well as Leishmania infection and development were compared in sand flies fed on blood from chickens and different mammalian sources.

Results: Large differences in haemoglobin and protein concentrations in whole blood (dog>human>rabbit> chicken) did not correlate with differences in bloodmeal protein concentrations (dog = chicken>human>rabbit). This indicated that Lu. longipalpis were able to concentrate bloodmeals taken from different hosts using prediuresis and this was confirmed by direct observation. Sand flies fed on chickens or dogs produced significantly more eggs than those fed on human blood. Female Lu. longipalpis retained significantly more urate inside their bodies when fed on chicken blood compared to those fed on rabbit blood. However, when the amounts of urate excreted after feeding were measured, sand flies fed on rabbit blood excreted significantly more than those fed on chicken blood. There was no difference in female longevity after feeding on avian or mammalian blood.Sand flies infected via chicken blood produced Leishmania mexicana infections with a similar developmental pattern but higher overall parasite populations than sand flies infected via rabbit blood.

Conclusions: The results of this study help to define the role that chickens play in the epidemiology of leishmaniasis. The present study using a Lu. longipalpis/L. mexicana model indicates that chickens are suitable hosts to support a Lu. longipalpis population and that chicken blood is likely to support the development of transmissible Leishmania infections in Lu. longipalpis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus