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Patient presenting with lipoma of the index finger: a case report.

Chronopoulos E, Nikolaos P, Karanikas C, Kalliakmanis A, Plessas S, Neofytou I, Laspas F, Tzovara I, Chalazonitis A - Cases J (2010)

Bottom Line: Lipomas can be found anywhere in the body with the majority located in the head and neck region as well as in the shoulder and back.He complained of no pain but he had difficulty in manual movements.There has been no recurrence for two years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Alexandra Hospital, Vasilisis Sofias 80, 11528, Athens, Greece. christoskaranikas@yahoo.gr.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Lipomas can be found anywhere in the body with the majority located in the head and neck region as well as in the shoulder and back. They are not very common in the hand and those involving the fingers are very rare. Although, it is not the only case reported, lipoma of the index finger is very uncommon.

Case presentation: A 52-year-old Caucasian man presented with a lipoma of the right index finger. He complained of no pain but he had difficulty in manual movements. Treatment was surgical excision of the lipoma. There has been no recurrence for two years.

Conclusion: Although lipomas of the fingers are rare entities, their awareness is imperative since the differential diagnosis from other soft tissue tumors and from the special lipomatous subtype involved is quite extensive.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lipoma arises from the subcutaneous tissues of proximal phalanx of the right first digit.
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Figure 2: Lipoma arises from the subcutaneous tissues of proximal phalanx of the right first digit.

Mentions: Under general anesthesia and the use of tourniquet, we performed a 'Z' shape incision in the volar aspect of the finger. The fatty, lobulated mass was found to be localized in the subcutaneous tissue and was attached close to the proximal and middle phalanx of the digit without interfering with the fascicles of the tendon (Figure 2). The neoplasm was removed completely including the extensions into the tendon sheath avoiding damage to the neurovascular bundles (Figure 3). The specimen measured 2 × 1 × 1 cm. Histological examination showed a yellowish, lobulated, ulcerative lipoma confirming the initial diagnosis. No complications occurred during the postoperative period while the patient achieved full range of motion. There were no sings of recurrence after a follow-up of 24 months.


Patient presenting with lipoma of the index finger: a case report.

Chronopoulos E, Nikolaos P, Karanikas C, Kalliakmanis A, Plessas S, Neofytou I, Laspas F, Tzovara I, Chalazonitis A - Cases J (2010)

Lipoma arises from the subcutaneous tissues of proximal phalanx of the right first digit.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2823713&req=5

Figure 2: Lipoma arises from the subcutaneous tissues of proximal phalanx of the right first digit.
Mentions: Under general anesthesia and the use of tourniquet, we performed a 'Z' shape incision in the volar aspect of the finger. The fatty, lobulated mass was found to be localized in the subcutaneous tissue and was attached close to the proximal and middle phalanx of the digit without interfering with the fascicles of the tendon (Figure 2). The neoplasm was removed completely including the extensions into the tendon sheath avoiding damage to the neurovascular bundles (Figure 3). The specimen measured 2 × 1 × 1 cm. Histological examination showed a yellowish, lobulated, ulcerative lipoma confirming the initial diagnosis. No complications occurred during the postoperative period while the patient achieved full range of motion. There were no sings of recurrence after a follow-up of 24 months.

Bottom Line: Lipomas can be found anywhere in the body with the majority located in the head and neck region as well as in the shoulder and back.He complained of no pain but he had difficulty in manual movements.There has been no recurrence for two years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Alexandra Hospital, Vasilisis Sofias 80, 11528, Athens, Greece. christoskaranikas@yahoo.gr.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Lipomas can be found anywhere in the body with the majority located in the head and neck region as well as in the shoulder and back. They are not very common in the hand and those involving the fingers are very rare. Although, it is not the only case reported, lipoma of the index finger is very uncommon.

Case presentation: A 52-year-old Caucasian man presented with a lipoma of the right index finger. He complained of no pain but he had difficulty in manual movements. Treatment was surgical excision of the lipoma. There has been no recurrence for two years.

Conclusion: Although lipomas of the fingers are rare entities, their awareness is imperative since the differential diagnosis from other soft tissue tumors and from the special lipomatous subtype involved is quite extensive.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus