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Keeping learning central: a model for implementing emerging technologies.

Willcockson IU, Phelps CL - Med Educ Online (2010)

Bottom Line: While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students' benefit.The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology.We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Information Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 7000 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Irmgard.Willcockson@uth.tmc.edu

ABSTRACT
FELT PROBLEM: Technology integration continues to be a challenge for health science faculty. While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students' benefit. OUR SOLUTION: We have developed a model that provides faculty a strategy for integrating emerging technologies into the classroom. The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology. We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.

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The eTIME model.
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Figure 0001: The eTIME model.

Mentions: In contrast, eTIME explicitly includes the triad of problem, technology, and learning theory. We believe that matching the technology to the learning theory and the learning problem/goal is the critical first step in a strategic implementation effort. We have used eTIME each year in our technology in education course and have iteratively improved it to encompass the critical facets needed to consider when implementing a technology (Fig. 1).


Keeping learning central: a model for implementing emerging technologies.

Willcockson IU, Phelps CL - Med Educ Online (2010)

The eTIME model.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2822651&req=5

Figure 0001: The eTIME model.
Mentions: In contrast, eTIME explicitly includes the triad of problem, technology, and learning theory. We believe that matching the technology to the learning theory and the learning problem/goal is the critical first step in a strategic implementation effort. We have used eTIME each year in our technology in education course and have iteratively improved it to encompass the critical facets needed to consider when implementing a technology (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students' benefit.The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology.We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Information Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 7000 Fannin, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Irmgard.Willcockson@uth.tmc.edu

ABSTRACT
FELT PROBLEM: Technology integration continues to be a challenge for health science faculty. While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students' benefit. OUR SOLUTION: We have developed a model that provides faculty a strategy for integrating emerging technologies into the classroom. The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology. We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.

Show MeSH