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Multimodal intraoperative neuromonitoring in corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: Evaluation of 354 consecutive cases.

Kundnani VK, Zhu L, Tak H, Wong H - Indian J Orthop (2010)

Bottom Line: There were no false positives with SSEP (high specificity) but 5 patients with false negatives with SSEP (38%) reduced its sensitivity.Due to these results, the overall sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of combined multimodality neuromonitoring in this adult deformity series was 100, 98.5 and 85%, respectively.Neurogenic motor-evoked potential (NMEP) monitoring appears to be superior to conventional SSEP monitoring for identifying evolving spinal cord injury.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Spine Center, National University Hospital, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Background: Multimodal intraoperative neuromonitoring is recommended during corrective spinal surgery, and has been widely used in surgery for spinal deformity with successful outcomes. Despite successful outcomes of corrective surgery due to increased safety of the patients with the usage of spinal cord monitoring in many large spine centers, this modality has not yet achieved widespread popularity. We report the analysis of prospectively collected intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring data of 354 consecutive patients undergoing corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) to establish the efficacy of multimodal neuromonitoring and to evaluate comparative sensitivity and specificity.

Materials and methods: The study group consisted of 354 (female = 309; male = 45) patients undergoing spinal deformity corrective surgery between 2004 and 2008. Patients were monitored using electrophysiological methods including somatosensory-evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials simultaneously.

Results: Mean age of patients was 13.6 years (+/-2.3 years). The operative procedures involved were instrumented fusion of the thoracic/lumbar/both curves, Baseline somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEP) and neurogenic motor-evoked potentials (NMEP) were recorded successfully in all cases. Thirteen cases expressed significant alert to prompt reversal of intervention. All these 13 cases with significant alert had detectable NMEP alerts, whereas significant SSEP alert was detected in 8 cases. Two patients awoke with new neurological deficit (0.56%) and had significant intraoperative SSEP + NMEP alerts. There were no false positives with SSEP (high specificity) but 5 patients with false negatives with SSEP (38%) reduced its sensitivity. There was no false negative with NMEP but 2 of 13 cases were false positive with NMEP (15%). The specificity of SSEP (100%) is higher than NMEP (96%); however, the sensitivity of NMEP (100%) is far better than SSEP (51%). Due to these results, the overall sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of combined multimodality neuromonitoring in this adult deformity series was 100, 98.5 and 85%, respectively.

Conclusion: Neurogenic motor-evoked potential (NMEP) monitoring appears to be superior to conventional SSEP monitoring for identifying evolving spinal cord injury. Used in conjunction, the sensitivity and specificity of combined neuromonitoring may reach up to 100%. Multimodality monitoring with SSEP + NMEP should be the standard of care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A case of a 16-year-old female patient with double major curve (Lenke type) right thoracic T3–T11 = 86° curve and thoracolumbar T11–L4 = 78° curve with normal baseline monitoring parameters. Significant alert was noticed with decline in both SSEP and NMEP signals during intraoperative corrective maneuver. Reversal action was started. However, only partial recovery of signals was detected. Patient had postoperative neurological deficit (Paraparesis - Frankel B)
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Figure 0001: A case of a 16-year-old female patient with double major curve (Lenke type) right thoracic T3–T11 = 86° curve and thoracolumbar T11–L4 = 78° curve with normal baseline monitoring parameters. Significant alert was noticed with decline in both SSEP and NMEP signals during intraoperative corrective maneuver. Reversal action was started. However, only partial recovery of signals was detected. Patient had postoperative neurological deficit (Paraparesis - Frankel B)

Mentions: Two of the thirteen with significant alert developed neurological deficit. In first case alert related to corrective maneuver on double major curve was followed by signal alert, and reversal was not met with complete recovery of signals [Figure 1] and arthrodesis was carried out with minimal correction. Patient awoke with paraparesis postoperatively (Frankel B), which improved subsequently to Frankel C at final follow-up. The other had transient, but clinically evident, lower-extremity weakness resolving over a period of 12 weeks. In the other case critical breach of screw was associated with signal alert and hypotension, and with removal of screw reversal of signals was observed, however only to 30% of baseline, patient had postoperative weakness of ipsilateral lower limb muscles resolving over a period of time. Both these patients with neurodeficit had NMEP + SSEP signal alerts and were classified as true positives.


Multimodal intraoperative neuromonitoring in corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: Evaluation of 354 consecutive cases.

Kundnani VK, Zhu L, Tak H, Wong H - Indian J Orthop (2010)

A case of a 16-year-old female patient with double major curve (Lenke type) right thoracic T3–T11 = 86° curve and thoracolumbar T11–L4 = 78° curve with normal baseline monitoring parameters. Significant alert was noticed with decline in both SSEP and NMEP signals during intraoperative corrective maneuver. Reversal action was started. However, only partial recovery of signals was detected. Patient had postoperative neurological deficit (Paraparesis - Frankel B)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2822422&req=5

Figure 0001: A case of a 16-year-old female patient with double major curve (Lenke type) right thoracic T3–T11 = 86° curve and thoracolumbar T11–L4 = 78° curve with normal baseline monitoring parameters. Significant alert was noticed with decline in both SSEP and NMEP signals during intraoperative corrective maneuver. Reversal action was started. However, only partial recovery of signals was detected. Patient had postoperative neurological deficit (Paraparesis - Frankel B)
Mentions: Two of the thirteen with significant alert developed neurological deficit. In first case alert related to corrective maneuver on double major curve was followed by signal alert, and reversal was not met with complete recovery of signals [Figure 1] and arthrodesis was carried out with minimal correction. Patient awoke with paraparesis postoperatively (Frankel B), which improved subsequently to Frankel C at final follow-up. The other had transient, but clinically evident, lower-extremity weakness resolving over a period of 12 weeks. In the other case critical breach of screw was associated with signal alert and hypotension, and with removal of screw reversal of signals was observed, however only to 30% of baseline, patient had postoperative weakness of ipsilateral lower limb muscles resolving over a period of time. Both these patients with neurodeficit had NMEP + SSEP signal alerts and were classified as true positives.

Bottom Line: There were no false positives with SSEP (high specificity) but 5 patients with false negatives with SSEP (38%) reduced its sensitivity.Due to these results, the overall sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of combined multimodality neuromonitoring in this adult deformity series was 100, 98.5 and 85%, respectively.Neurogenic motor-evoked potential (NMEP) monitoring appears to be superior to conventional SSEP monitoring for identifying evolving spinal cord injury.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Spine Center, National University Hospital, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Background: Multimodal intraoperative neuromonitoring is recommended during corrective spinal surgery, and has been widely used in surgery for spinal deformity with successful outcomes. Despite successful outcomes of corrective surgery due to increased safety of the patients with the usage of spinal cord monitoring in many large spine centers, this modality has not yet achieved widespread popularity. We report the analysis of prospectively collected intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring data of 354 consecutive patients undergoing corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) to establish the efficacy of multimodal neuromonitoring and to evaluate comparative sensitivity and specificity.

Materials and methods: The study group consisted of 354 (female = 309; male = 45) patients undergoing spinal deformity corrective surgery between 2004 and 2008. Patients were monitored using electrophysiological methods including somatosensory-evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials simultaneously.

Results: Mean age of patients was 13.6 years (+/-2.3 years). The operative procedures involved were instrumented fusion of the thoracic/lumbar/both curves, Baseline somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEP) and neurogenic motor-evoked potentials (NMEP) were recorded successfully in all cases. Thirteen cases expressed significant alert to prompt reversal of intervention. All these 13 cases with significant alert had detectable NMEP alerts, whereas significant SSEP alert was detected in 8 cases. Two patients awoke with new neurological deficit (0.56%) and had significant intraoperative SSEP + NMEP alerts. There were no false positives with SSEP (high specificity) but 5 patients with false negatives with SSEP (38%) reduced its sensitivity. There was no false negative with NMEP but 2 of 13 cases were false positive with NMEP (15%). The specificity of SSEP (100%) is higher than NMEP (96%); however, the sensitivity of NMEP (100%) is far better than SSEP (51%). Due to these results, the overall sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of combined multimodality neuromonitoring in this adult deformity series was 100, 98.5 and 85%, respectively.

Conclusion: Neurogenic motor-evoked potential (NMEP) monitoring appears to be superior to conventional SSEP monitoring for identifying evolving spinal cord injury. Used in conjunction, the sensitivity and specificity of combined neuromonitoring may reach up to 100%. Multimodality monitoring with SSEP + NMEP should be the standard of care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus