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Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (Masson's hemangioma) of the liver: a new hepatic lesion.

Hong SG, Cho HM, Chin HM, Park IY, Yoo JY, Hwang SS, Kim JG, Park WB, Chun CS - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2004)

Bottom Line: In 1923, Masson regarded this disease as a neoplasm inducing endothelial proliferation, however, now it is considered to be a reactive vascular proliferation following traumatic vascular stasis.The lesion has a propensity to occur in the head, neck, fingers, and trunk.Occurrence within the abdominal cavity is known to be very rare, and especially in the liver, there has been no reported case up to date.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, St. Vincent 's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (Masson's hemangioma) is a disease characterized by exuberant endothelial proliferation within the lumen of medium-sized veins. In 1923, Masson regarded this disease as a neoplasm inducing endothelial proliferation, however, now it is considered to be a reactive vascular proliferation following traumatic vascular stasis. The lesion has a propensity to occur in the head, neck, fingers, and trunk. Occurrence within the abdominal cavity is known to be very rare, and especially in the liver, there has been no reported case up to date. The authors have experienced intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia of the liver in a 69-yr-old woman, and report the case with a review of the literature.

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H-E stained microscopic specimen (×40). The thrombotic material is fragmented and entrapped by the ingrowing endothelial cells. There is no soft tissue invasion, atypia, or significant necrosis.
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Figure 6: H-E stained microscopic specimen (×40). The thrombotic material is fragmented and entrapped by the ingrowing endothelial cells. There is no soft tissue invasion, atypia, or significant necrosis.

Mentions: Thrombotic material fragmented and entrapped by the ingrowing endothelial cells was reported by the pathologist. There was no soft tissue invasion, atypia, or significant necrosis, which collectively supported the diagnosis of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (Masson's hemangioma) of the liver (Fig. 6). The surgical procedure and recovery period were not complicated.


Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (Masson's hemangioma) of the liver: a new hepatic lesion.

Hong SG, Cho HM, Chin HM, Park IY, Yoo JY, Hwang SS, Kim JG, Park WB, Chun CS - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2004)

H-E stained microscopic specimen (×40). The thrombotic material is fragmented and entrapped by the ingrowing endothelial cells. There is no soft tissue invasion, atypia, or significant necrosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2822318&req=5

Figure 6: H-E stained microscopic specimen (×40). The thrombotic material is fragmented and entrapped by the ingrowing endothelial cells. There is no soft tissue invasion, atypia, or significant necrosis.
Mentions: Thrombotic material fragmented and entrapped by the ingrowing endothelial cells was reported by the pathologist. There was no soft tissue invasion, atypia, or significant necrosis, which collectively supported the diagnosis of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (Masson's hemangioma) of the liver (Fig. 6). The surgical procedure and recovery period were not complicated.

Bottom Line: In 1923, Masson regarded this disease as a neoplasm inducing endothelial proliferation, however, now it is considered to be a reactive vascular proliferation following traumatic vascular stasis.The lesion has a propensity to occur in the head, neck, fingers, and trunk.Occurrence within the abdominal cavity is known to be very rare, and especially in the liver, there has been no reported case up to date.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, St. Vincent 's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (Masson's hemangioma) is a disease characterized by exuberant endothelial proliferation within the lumen of medium-sized veins. In 1923, Masson regarded this disease as a neoplasm inducing endothelial proliferation, however, now it is considered to be a reactive vascular proliferation following traumatic vascular stasis. The lesion has a propensity to occur in the head, neck, fingers, and trunk. Occurrence within the abdominal cavity is known to be very rare, and especially in the liver, there has been no reported case up to date. The authors have experienced intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia of the liver in a 69-yr-old woman, and report the case with a review of the literature.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus