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Increasing prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, expanded-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, and imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Korea: KONSAR study in 2001.

Lee K, Jang SJ, Lee HJ, Ryoo N, Kim M, Hong SG, Chong Y, Korean Nationwide Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Gro - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2004)

Bottom Line: The resistance rates of P. aeruginosa were 21% to ceftazidime, 17% to imipenem, and those of the acinetobacters were > or =61% to ceftazidime, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolone and cotrimoxazole.Thirty-five percent of non-typhoidal salmonellae were ampicillin resistant, and 66% of Haemophilus influenzae were beta-lactamase producers.Notable changes over the 1997-2001 period were: increases in vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, and amikacin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant acinetobacters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul 120-752, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The 5th year KONSAR surveillance in 2001 was based on routine test data at 30 participating hospitals. It was of particular interest to find a trend in the resistances of enterococci to vancomycin, of Enterobacteriaceae to the 3rd generation cephalosporin and fluoroquinolone, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and acinetobacters to carbapenem. Resistance rates of Gram-positive cocci were: 70% of Staphylococcus aureus to oxacillin; 88% and 16% of Enterococcus faecium to ampicillin and vancomycin, respectively. Seventy-two percent of pneumococci were nonsusceptible to penicillin. The resistance rates of Enterobacteriaceae were: Escherichia coli, 28% to fluoroquinolone; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 27% to ceftazidime, and 20% to cefoxitin; and Enterobacter cloacae, > or =40% to cefotaxime and ceftazidime. The resistance rates of P. aeruginosa were 21% to ceftazidime, 17% to imipenem, and those of the acinetobacters were > or =61% to ceftazidime, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolone and cotrimoxazole. Thirty-five percent of non-typhoidal salmonellae were ampicillin resistant, and 66% of Haemophilus influenzae were beta-lactamase producers. Notable changes over the 1997-2001 period were: increases in vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, and amikacin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant acinetobacters. With the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria, nationwide surveillance has become more important for optimal patient management, for the control of nosocomial infection, and for the conservation of the newer antimicrobial agents.

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Trend of resistance of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter isolates to ceftazidime and imipenem at large and medium hospitals. S, Seoul; NS, non-Seoul; Med, medium.
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Figure 5: Trend of resistance of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter isolates to ceftazidime and imipenem at large and medium hospitals. S, Seoul; NS, non-Seoul; Med, medium.

Mentions: During the 1997-2001 period, cefoxitin-resistant K. pneumoniae increased from 16% to 20%, and ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae from 58% to 64% (Fig. 3). The amikacin resistance rate of P. aeruginosa declined slightly from 33% to 26%, while that of acinetobacters gradually increased from 50% to 61%. The resistance rates of acinetobacters to fluoroquinolone rose from 56% to 65% (Fig. 4), while the rates to imipenem remained to be 5% to 6% (Fig. 3). Ceftazidime- and imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were present in all hospital groups (Fig. 5).


Increasing prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, expanded-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, and imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Korea: KONSAR study in 2001.

Lee K, Jang SJ, Lee HJ, Ryoo N, Kim M, Hong SG, Chong Y, Korean Nationwide Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance Gro - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2004)

Trend of resistance of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter isolates to ceftazidime and imipenem at large and medium hospitals. S, Seoul; NS, non-Seoul; Med, medium.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2822269&req=5

Figure 5: Trend of resistance of P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter isolates to ceftazidime and imipenem at large and medium hospitals. S, Seoul; NS, non-Seoul; Med, medium.
Mentions: During the 1997-2001 period, cefoxitin-resistant K. pneumoniae increased from 16% to 20%, and ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae from 58% to 64% (Fig. 3). The amikacin resistance rate of P. aeruginosa declined slightly from 33% to 26%, while that of acinetobacters gradually increased from 50% to 61%. The resistance rates of acinetobacters to fluoroquinolone rose from 56% to 65% (Fig. 4), while the rates to imipenem remained to be 5% to 6% (Fig. 3). Ceftazidime- and imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa were present in all hospital groups (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: The resistance rates of P. aeruginosa were 21% to ceftazidime, 17% to imipenem, and those of the acinetobacters were > or =61% to ceftazidime, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolone and cotrimoxazole.Thirty-five percent of non-typhoidal salmonellae were ampicillin resistant, and 66% of Haemophilus influenzae were beta-lactamase producers.Notable changes over the 1997-2001 period were: increases in vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, and amikacin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant acinetobacters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul 120-752, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The 5th year KONSAR surveillance in 2001 was based on routine test data at 30 participating hospitals. It was of particular interest to find a trend in the resistances of enterococci to vancomycin, of Enterobacteriaceae to the 3rd generation cephalosporin and fluoroquinolone, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and acinetobacters to carbapenem. Resistance rates of Gram-positive cocci were: 70% of Staphylococcus aureus to oxacillin; 88% and 16% of Enterococcus faecium to ampicillin and vancomycin, respectively. Seventy-two percent of pneumococci were nonsusceptible to penicillin. The resistance rates of Enterobacteriaceae were: Escherichia coli, 28% to fluoroquinolone; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 27% to ceftazidime, and 20% to cefoxitin; and Enterobacter cloacae, > or =40% to cefotaxime and ceftazidime. The resistance rates of P. aeruginosa were 21% to ceftazidime, 17% to imipenem, and those of the acinetobacters were > or =61% to ceftazidime, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolone and cotrimoxazole. Thirty-five percent of non-typhoidal salmonellae were ampicillin resistant, and 66% of Haemophilus influenzae were beta-lactamase producers. Notable changes over the 1997-2001 period were: increases in vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, and amikacin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant acinetobacters. With the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria, nationwide surveillance has become more important for optimal patient management, for the control of nosocomial infection, and for the conservation of the newer antimicrobial agents.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus