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Effect of cryoanalgesia combined with intravenous continuous analgesia in thoracotomy patients.

Gwak MS, Yang M, Hahm TS, Cho HS, Cho CH, Song JG - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2004)

Bottom Line: No significant differences were observed between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain, analgesic requirements, side effects, respiratory complications, or prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain.However, a significant increase in FVC and FEV1 was observed on the 7th POD in IVCAcryo group.The incidence of the post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively was 68, 60, and 44% in IVCA group, and 88, 68, and 28% in IVCAcryo group, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Fifty patients undergoing thoracotomy was studied to compare the effects of cryoanalgesia combined with intravenous continuous analgesia (IVCA). Patients were randomized into two groups: IVCA group and IVCA-cryo group. Subjective pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale at rest (VAS-R) and during movement (VAS-M). Analgesic requirements were evaluated over the 7 days following surgery. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) were measured before operation, on the 2nd and 7th postoperative days (POD). We interviewed patients by telephone to evaluate the prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively. No significant differences were observed between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain, analgesic requirements, side effects, respiratory complications, or prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain. However, a significant increase in FVC and FEV1 was observed on the 7th POD in IVCAcryo group. The incidence of the post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively was 68, 60, and 44% in IVCA group, and 88, 68, and 28% in IVCAcryo group, respectively. Our study showed that cryoanalgesia combined with IVCA effectively restore respiratory function on 7th POD, but that it was not effective at reducing the incidence of post-thoracotomy pain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Visual analogue scale at rest and during movement show no difference between the two groups. Data expressed as mean±SD.
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Figure 1: Visual analogue scale at rest and during movement show no difference between the two groups. Data expressed as mean±SD.

Mentions: No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with respect to VAS-R or VAS-M (Fig. 1), and the groups were similar in terms of analgesics requirements (Fig. 2). FVC and FEV1 increased significantly in IVCA-cryo group on the 7th POD (Fig. 3). On the contrary, FVC and FEV1 on the 2nd POD was slightly lower in IVCA-cryo group than in IVCA group, but this difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of pruritus, nausea, vomiting, atelectasis, pneumonia and effusion was similar in the two groups (Table 2).


Effect of cryoanalgesia combined with intravenous continuous analgesia in thoracotomy patients.

Gwak MS, Yang M, Hahm TS, Cho HS, Cho CH, Song JG - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2004)

Visual analogue scale at rest and during movement show no difference between the two groups. Data expressed as mean±SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2822267&req=5

Figure 1: Visual analogue scale at rest and during movement show no difference between the two groups. Data expressed as mean±SD.
Mentions: No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with respect to VAS-R or VAS-M (Fig. 1), and the groups were similar in terms of analgesics requirements (Fig. 2). FVC and FEV1 increased significantly in IVCA-cryo group on the 7th POD (Fig. 3). On the contrary, FVC and FEV1 on the 2nd POD was slightly lower in IVCA-cryo group than in IVCA group, but this difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of pruritus, nausea, vomiting, atelectasis, pneumonia and effusion was similar in the two groups (Table 2).

Bottom Line: No significant differences were observed between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain, analgesic requirements, side effects, respiratory complications, or prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain.However, a significant increase in FVC and FEV1 was observed on the 7th POD in IVCAcryo group.The incidence of the post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively was 68, 60, and 44% in IVCA group, and 88, 68, and 28% in IVCAcryo group, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Fifty patients undergoing thoracotomy was studied to compare the effects of cryoanalgesia combined with intravenous continuous analgesia (IVCA). Patients were randomized into two groups: IVCA group and IVCA-cryo group. Subjective pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale at rest (VAS-R) and during movement (VAS-M). Analgesic requirements were evaluated over the 7 days following surgery. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) were measured before operation, on the 2nd and 7th postoperative days (POD). We interviewed patients by telephone to evaluate the prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively. No significant differences were observed between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain, analgesic requirements, side effects, respiratory complications, or prevalence of post-thoracotomy pain. However, a significant increase in FVC and FEV1 was observed on the 7th POD in IVCAcryo group. The incidence of the post-thoracotomy pain at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months postoperatively was 68, 60, and 44% in IVCA group, and 88, 68, and 28% in IVCAcryo group, respectively. Our study showed that cryoanalgesia combined with IVCA effectively restore respiratory function on 7th POD, but that it was not effective at reducing the incidence of post-thoracotomy pain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus