Limits...
Molecular motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs): structure, cargo and disease.

Seog DH, Lee DH, Lee SK - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2004)

Bottom Line: Intracellular organelle transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell.Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identities of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation.This review focuses on the structure, the binding partners of kinesins and kinesin-based human diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan, Korea. daehyun@ijnc.inje.ac.kr

ABSTRACT
Intracellular organelle transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell. Kinesins and kinesin-related proteins make up a large superfamily of molecular motors that transport cargoes such as vesicles, organelles (e.g. mitochondria, peroxisomes, lysosomes), protein complexes (e.g. elements of the cytoskeleton, virus particles), and mRNAs in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Until now, more than 45 kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) have been identified in the mouse and human genomes. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identities of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. This review focuses on the structure, the binding partners of kinesins and kinesin-based human diseases.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Movement of kinesin along a microtubule. At the start of the cycle, the ATP bounded head binds to the microtubule. ATP hydrolysis in the first head and exchange of ATP for ADP in the second head pulls the first head off the microtubule and moves the first head along the microtubule. With the cycle repeats, kinesin has moves the plus end of the microtubule.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2822243&req=5

Figure 1: Movement of kinesin along a microtubule. At the start of the cycle, the ATP bounded head binds to the microtubule. ATP hydrolysis in the first head and exchange of ATP for ADP in the second head pulls the first head off the microtubule and moves the first head along the microtubule. With the cycle repeats, kinesin has moves the plus end of the microtubule.


Molecular motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs): structure, cargo and disease.

Seog DH, Lee DH, Lee SK - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2004)

Movement of kinesin along a microtubule. At the start of the cycle, the ATP bounded head binds to the microtubule. ATP hydrolysis in the first head and exchange of ATP for ADP in the second head pulls the first head off the microtubule and moves the first head along the microtubule. With the cycle repeats, kinesin has moves the plus end of the microtubule.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2822243&req=5

Figure 1: Movement of kinesin along a microtubule. At the start of the cycle, the ATP bounded head binds to the microtubule. ATP hydrolysis in the first head and exchange of ATP for ADP in the second head pulls the first head off the microtubule and moves the first head along the microtubule. With the cycle repeats, kinesin has moves the plus end of the microtubule.
Bottom Line: Intracellular organelle transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell.Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identities of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation.This review focuses on the structure, the binding partners of kinesins and kinesin-based human diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan, Korea. daehyun@ijnc.inje.ac.kr

ABSTRACT
Intracellular organelle transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell. Kinesins and kinesin-related proteins make up a large superfamily of molecular motors that transport cargoes such as vesicles, organelles (e.g. mitochondria, peroxisomes, lysosomes), protein complexes (e.g. elements of the cytoskeleton, virus particles), and mRNAs in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Until now, more than 45 kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) have been identified in the mouse and human genomes. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identities of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. This review focuses on the structure, the binding partners of kinesins and kinesin-based human diseases.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus