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Footwear and foot care knowledge as risk factors for foot problems in Indian diabetics.

Chandalia HB, Singh D, Kapoor V, Chandalia SH, Lamba PS - Int J Diabetes Dev Ctries (2008)

Bottom Line: A structured questionnaire evaluated the knowledge about foot care, type of footwear used, education level, association of tobacco abuse, and any associated symptoms of foot disease.Fourteen (4.7%) patients gave history of foot ulceration in the past and comprised the high risk group; only 2 out of 14 had received foot care education, 6 gave history of tobacco abuse, 8 had symptoms of claudication, 9 had paresthesias, 2 walked barefoot indoors.In the high- and low-risk diabetic groups, VPT was 19.57 +/- 11.26 and 15.20 +/- 10.21V (P < 0.02), ankle brachial ratio was 1.05 +/- 0.19 and 1.14 +/- 0.18 (P < 0.05), and the questionnaire scores was 40.8% and 57%, respectively.In the diabetic and the control group, VPT was 15.62 +/- 10.39 and 8.36 +/- 3.61 V (P < 0.01), ankle brachial ratio was 1.14 +/- 0.18 and 1.15 +/- 0.12, and the questionnaire scores were 57% and 40.3%, respectively.In conclusion, poor knowledge of foot care and poor footwear practices were important risk factors for foot problems in diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetes Endocrine Nutrition Management and Research Center (DENMARC), Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
We assessed 300 diabetic and 100 age- and sex-matched controls for correlating foot wear practices and foot care knowledge and the presence of foot complications. A structured questionnaire evaluated the knowledge about foot care, type of footwear used, education level, association of tobacco abuse, and any associated symptoms of foot disease. Clinical evaluation was done by inspection of feet for presence of any external deformities, assessment of sensory function (vibration perception threshold, VPT), vascular status (foot pulses and ankle brachial ratio) and presence of any infection.In the diabetes category, 44.7% patients had not received previous foot care education. 0.6% walked barefoot outdoors and 45% walked barefoot indoors. Fourteen (4.7%) patients gave history of foot ulceration in the past and comprised the high risk group; only 2 out of 14 had received foot care education, 6 gave history of tobacco abuse, 8 had symptoms of claudication, 9 had paresthesias, 2 walked barefoot indoors. Average duration of diabetes in the high-risk and low-risk diabetes group was 10.85 +/- 6.53 and 9.83 +/- 7.99 years, respectively. In the high- and low-risk diabetic groups, VPT was 19.57 +/- 11.26 and 15.20 +/- 10.21V (P < 0.02), ankle brachial ratio was 1.05 +/- 0.19 and 1.14 +/- 0.18 (P < 0.05), and the questionnaire scores was 40.8% and 57%, respectively.In the diabetic and the control group, VPT was 15.62 +/- 10.39 and 8.36 +/- 3.61 V (P < 0.01), ankle brachial ratio was 1.14 +/- 0.18 and 1.15 +/- 0.12, and the questionnaire scores were 57% and 40.3%, respectively.In conclusion, poor knowledge of foot care and poor footwear practices were important risk factors for foot problems in diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Questionnaire score in diabetics and non-diabetic controls
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Figure 0002: Questionnaire score in diabetics and non-diabetic controls

Mentions: Assessment of the questionnaire revealed that diabetics had more awareness about footwear, foot care and knowledge of symptoms relating to diabetic foot than the nondiabetic controls [Figure 2]. In fact, controls could have received some education in foot care as relatives of diabetics. However, even in the diabetics the total average score was 57% indicating that there was scope for improving knowledge about prevention of diabetic foot disease.


Footwear and foot care knowledge as risk factors for foot problems in Indian diabetics.

Chandalia HB, Singh D, Kapoor V, Chandalia SH, Lamba PS - Int J Diabetes Dev Ctries (2008)

Questionnaire score in diabetics and non-diabetic controls
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2822153&req=5

Figure 0002: Questionnaire score in diabetics and non-diabetic controls
Mentions: Assessment of the questionnaire revealed that diabetics had more awareness about footwear, foot care and knowledge of symptoms relating to diabetic foot than the nondiabetic controls [Figure 2]. In fact, controls could have received some education in foot care as relatives of diabetics. However, even in the diabetics the total average score was 57% indicating that there was scope for improving knowledge about prevention of diabetic foot disease.

Bottom Line: A structured questionnaire evaluated the knowledge about foot care, type of footwear used, education level, association of tobacco abuse, and any associated symptoms of foot disease.Fourteen (4.7%) patients gave history of foot ulceration in the past and comprised the high risk group; only 2 out of 14 had received foot care education, 6 gave history of tobacco abuse, 8 had symptoms of claudication, 9 had paresthesias, 2 walked barefoot indoors.In the high- and low-risk diabetic groups, VPT was 19.57 +/- 11.26 and 15.20 +/- 10.21V (P < 0.02), ankle brachial ratio was 1.05 +/- 0.19 and 1.14 +/- 0.18 (P < 0.05), and the questionnaire scores was 40.8% and 57%, respectively.In the diabetic and the control group, VPT was 15.62 +/- 10.39 and 8.36 +/- 3.61 V (P < 0.01), ankle brachial ratio was 1.14 +/- 0.18 and 1.15 +/- 0.12, and the questionnaire scores were 57% and 40.3%, respectively.In conclusion, poor knowledge of foot care and poor footwear practices were important risk factors for foot problems in diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetes Endocrine Nutrition Management and Research Center (DENMARC), Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
We assessed 300 diabetic and 100 age- and sex-matched controls for correlating foot wear practices and foot care knowledge and the presence of foot complications. A structured questionnaire evaluated the knowledge about foot care, type of footwear used, education level, association of tobacco abuse, and any associated symptoms of foot disease. Clinical evaluation was done by inspection of feet for presence of any external deformities, assessment of sensory function (vibration perception threshold, VPT), vascular status (foot pulses and ankle brachial ratio) and presence of any infection.In the diabetes category, 44.7% patients had not received previous foot care education. 0.6% walked barefoot outdoors and 45% walked barefoot indoors. Fourteen (4.7%) patients gave history of foot ulceration in the past and comprised the high risk group; only 2 out of 14 had received foot care education, 6 gave history of tobacco abuse, 8 had symptoms of claudication, 9 had paresthesias, 2 walked barefoot indoors. Average duration of diabetes in the high-risk and low-risk diabetes group was 10.85 +/- 6.53 and 9.83 +/- 7.99 years, respectively. In the high- and low-risk diabetic groups, VPT was 19.57 +/- 11.26 and 15.20 +/- 10.21V (P < 0.02), ankle brachial ratio was 1.05 +/- 0.19 and 1.14 +/- 0.18 (P < 0.05), and the questionnaire scores was 40.8% and 57%, respectively.In the diabetic and the control group, VPT was 15.62 +/- 10.39 and 8.36 +/- 3.61 V (P < 0.01), ankle brachial ratio was 1.14 +/- 0.18 and 1.15 +/- 0.12, and the questionnaire scores were 57% and 40.3%, respectively.In conclusion, poor knowledge of foot care and poor footwear practices were important risk factors for foot problems in diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus