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T-lymphocyte subsets in apparently healthy nigerian children.

Idigbe EO, Audu RA, Iroha EO, Akinsulie AO, Temiye EO, Ezeaka VC, Adetifa IM, Musa AZ, Onyewuche J, Ikondu SU - Int J Pediatr (2010)

Bottom Line: This study compared the values in our population with CDC and WHO reference values.Except for CD8%, mean values for all parameters measured significantly decreased with age.Children <3 years had median CD4% lower than WHO normal values.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Virology Laboratory, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
Population studies showed that there are differences in T-lymphocytes subpopulation of normal children in different regions, and reference values in an area might be different from another. This study compared the values in our population with CDC and WHO reference values. Blood samples from 279 healthy, HIV-negative children <12 years of age were analysed for complete blood count, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ counts and percentages. Except for CD8%, mean values for all parameters measured significantly decreased with age. CD4+ counts were higher in females than males, P < .05. Using the WHO criteria, 15.9% of subjects had low total lymphocyte count and 20.6% had low CD4 count. Children <3 years had median CD4% lower than WHO normal values. Our median CD4+ counts correlated with CDC values. Values used by WHO in infants are higher than ours. We suggest that our children be assessed using CDC reference values which correlate with ours.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of the median CD4+ count by age with normal CDC counts.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Comparison of the median CD4+ count by age with normal CDC counts.

Mentions: The closest comparison was however in the CD4 count values of CDC and the 50th percentile values in our study where there was no statistical differences in study values and CDC values in the age groups <1 year (1,500 CDC versus 1,624 cells/μL for our study) and those between 1 and 5 years 1,000 cells/μL CDC versus 1,047 cells/μL for our study), but the value was much higher in the age group 6 years and above (500 cells/μL CDC versus 996 cells/μL for our study) (Figure 2).


T-lymphocyte subsets in apparently healthy nigerian children.

Idigbe EO, Audu RA, Iroha EO, Akinsulie AO, Temiye EO, Ezeaka VC, Adetifa IM, Musa AZ, Onyewuche J, Ikondu SU - Int J Pediatr (2010)

Comparison of the median CD4+ count by age with normal CDC counts.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821635&req=5

fig2: Comparison of the median CD4+ count by age with normal CDC counts.
Mentions: The closest comparison was however in the CD4 count values of CDC and the 50th percentile values in our study where there was no statistical differences in study values and CDC values in the age groups <1 year (1,500 CDC versus 1,624 cells/μL for our study) and those between 1 and 5 years 1,000 cells/μL CDC versus 1,047 cells/μL for our study), but the value was much higher in the age group 6 years and above (500 cells/μL CDC versus 996 cells/μL for our study) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: This study compared the values in our population with CDC and WHO reference values.Except for CD8%, mean values for all parameters measured significantly decreased with age.Children <3 years had median CD4% lower than WHO normal values.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Virology Laboratory, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
Population studies showed that there are differences in T-lymphocytes subpopulation of normal children in different regions, and reference values in an area might be different from another. This study compared the values in our population with CDC and WHO reference values. Blood samples from 279 healthy, HIV-negative children <12 years of age were analysed for complete blood count, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ counts and percentages. Except for CD8%, mean values for all parameters measured significantly decreased with age. CD4+ counts were higher in females than males, P < .05. Using the WHO criteria, 15.9% of subjects had low total lymphocyte count and 20.6% had low CD4 count. Children <3 years had median CD4% lower than WHO normal values. Our median CD4+ counts correlated with CDC values. Values used by WHO in infants are higher than ours. We suggest that our children be assessed using CDC reference values which correlate with ours.

No MeSH data available.