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Weight change over five-year periods and number of components of the metabolic syndrome in a Dutch cohort.

Bot M, Spijkerman AM, Twisk JW, Verschuren WM - Eur. J. Epidemiol. (2010)

Bottom Line: Weight was measured in round 1 and at each 5-year interval follow-up (round 2, 3 and 4).Weight change was defined as the absolute weight change between two consecutive measurements.The association was stronger in 30-39 years (adjusted rate ratio: 1.044; 95%CI: 1.040-1.049) and smaller in older age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. m.bot@uvt.nl

ABSTRACT
Overweight and obesity are associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We studied the association of weight change over three consecutive 5-year periods with the number of MetS components in people aged 20-59 years. 5735 participants from the Doetinchem Cohort Study were included. Weight was measured in round 1 and at each 5-year interval follow-up (round 2, 3 and 4). Weight change was defined as the absolute weight change between two consecutive measurements. The number of MetS components (assessed in round 2, 3 and 4) was based on the presence of the following components of the MetS: central obesity, raised blood pressure, reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated glucose. Associations of weight change and the number of components of the MetS were analyzed with Generalized Estimating Equations for Poisson regression, stratified for 10-year age groups. For each age group, 1 kg weight gain was positively associated with the number of components of the MetS, independent of sex and measurement round. The association was stronger in 30-39 years (adjusted rate ratio: 1.044; 95%CI: 1.040-1.049) and smaller in older age groups. Compared to stable weight (>-2.5 kg and < 2.5 kg), weight loss (< or = -2.5 kg) and weight gain (> or =2.5 kg) was associated with a lower and higher rate ratio respectively, for the number of components of the MetS. Our results support the independent association of weight change with the number of MetS components with a more pronounced association in younger people.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage individuals (height bar) and mean absolute weight change in kg over 5 years (number in the bar) averaged over the four measurement rounds per weight change category for each age group
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Fig2: Percentage individuals (height bar) and mean absolute weight change in kg over 5 years (number in the bar) averaged over the four measurement rounds per weight change category for each age group

Mentions: In Fig. 2, the percentage individuals with weight loss (≤ −2.5 kg), stable weight (>−2.5 kg and < 2.5 kg) and weight gain (≥ 2.5 kg) over 5 years are presented per age group. The percentage of persons with weight gain became smaller with increasing age. The participants aged 20–29 years did not only have the highest percentage weight gainers (53%), but also the highest absolute increase in weight (6.8 kg ± 4.0) in the weight gain group. Furthermore, average weight change over 5 years is larger in younger age groups (20–29 years: 3.1 ± 5.4 kg) than in older age groups (50–59 years: 1.0 ± 4.2 kg).Fig. 2


Weight change over five-year periods and number of components of the metabolic syndrome in a Dutch cohort.

Bot M, Spijkerman AM, Twisk JW, Verschuren WM - Eur. J. Epidemiol. (2010)

Percentage individuals (height bar) and mean absolute weight change in kg over 5 years (number in the bar) averaged over the four measurement rounds per weight change category for each age group
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821620&req=5

Fig2: Percentage individuals (height bar) and mean absolute weight change in kg over 5 years (number in the bar) averaged over the four measurement rounds per weight change category for each age group
Mentions: In Fig. 2, the percentage individuals with weight loss (≤ −2.5 kg), stable weight (>−2.5 kg and < 2.5 kg) and weight gain (≥ 2.5 kg) over 5 years are presented per age group. The percentage of persons with weight gain became smaller with increasing age. The participants aged 20–29 years did not only have the highest percentage weight gainers (53%), but also the highest absolute increase in weight (6.8 kg ± 4.0) in the weight gain group. Furthermore, average weight change over 5 years is larger in younger age groups (20–29 years: 3.1 ± 5.4 kg) than in older age groups (50–59 years: 1.0 ± 4.2 kg).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Weight was measured in round 1 and at each 5-year interval follow-up (round 2, 3 and 4).Weight change was defined as the absolute weight change between two consecutive measurements.The association was stronger in 30-39 years (adjusted rate ratio: 1.044; 95%CI: 1.040-1.049) and smaller in older age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. m.bot@uvt.nl

ABSTRACT
Overweight and obesity are associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We studied the association of weight change over three consecutive 5-year periods with the number of MetS components in people aged 20-59 years. 5735 participants from the Doetinchem Cohort Study were included. Weight was measured in round 1 and at each 5-year interval follow-up (round 2, 3 and 4). Weight change was defined as the absolute weight change between two consecutive measurements. The number of MetS components (assessed in round 2, 3 and 4) was based on the presence of the following components of the MetS: central obesity, raised blood pressure, reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated glucose. Associations of weight change and the number of components of the MetS were analyzed with Generalized Estimating Equations for Poisson regression, stratified for 10-year age groups. For each age group, 1 kg weight gain was positively associated with the number of components of the MetS, independent of sex and measurement round. The association was stronger in 30-39 years (adjusted rate ratio: 1.044; 95%CI: 1.040-1.049) and smaller in older age groups. Compared to stable weight (>-2.5 kg and < 2.5 kg), weight loss (< or = -2.5 kg) and weight gain (> or =2.5 kg) was associated with a lower and higher rate ratio respectively, for the number of components of the MetS. Our results support the independent association of weight change with the number of MetS components with a more pronounced association in younger people.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus