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Weight change over five-year periods and number of components of the metabolic syndrome in a Dutch cohort.

Bot M, Spijkerman AM, Twisk JW, Verschuren WM - Eur. J. Epidemiol. (2010)

Bottom Line: Weight was measured in round 1 and at each 5-year interval follow-up (round 2, 3 and 4).Weight change was defined as the absolute weight change between two consecutive measurements.The association was stronger in 30-39 years (adjusted rate ratio: 1.044; 95%CI: 1.040-1.049) and smaller in older age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. m.bot@uvt.nl

ABSTRACT
Overweight and obesity are associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We studied the association of weight change over three consecutive 5-year periods with the number of MetS components in people aged 20-59 years. 5735 participants from the Doetinchem Cohort Study were included. Weight was measured in round 1 and at each 5-year interval follow-up (round 2, 3 and 4). Weight change was defined as the absolute weight change between two consecutive measurements. The number of MetS components (assessed in round 2, 3 and 4) was based on the presence of the following components of the MetS: central obesity, raised blood pressure, reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated glucose. Associations of weight change and the number of components of the MetS were analyzed with Generalized Estimating Equations for Poisson regression, stratified for 10-year age groups. For each age group, 1 kg weight gain was positively associated with the number of components of the MetS, independent of sex and measurement round. The association was stronger in 30-39 years (adjusted rate ratio: 1.044; 95%CI: 1.040-1.049) and smaller in older age groups. Compared to stable weight (>-2.5 kg and < 2.5 kg), weight loss (< or = -2.5 kg) and weight gain (> or =2.5 kg) was associated with a lower and higher rate ratio respectively, for the number of components of the MetS. Our results support the independent association of weight change with the number of MetS components with a more pronounced association in younger people.

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Overview of analyses of 5 year weight change and number of components of the MetS. Weight change is measured between round 1 and 2 and associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 2 (white arrows and white box). Weight change between round 2 and 3 was associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 3 (gray arrows and gray box). Weight change between round 3 and 4 was associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 4 (black arrows and black box). These three sets of data were stacked and jointly analyzed with GEE
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Fig1: Overview of analyses of 5 year weight change and number of components of the MetS. Weight change is measured between round 1 and 2 and associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 2 (white arrows and white box). Weight change between round 2 and 3 was associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 3 (gray arrows and gray box). Weight change between round 3 and 4 was associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 4 (black arrows and black box). These three sets of data were stacked and jointly analyzed with GEE

Mentions: The study design is previously described elsewhere [24]. In brief, the Doetinchem Cohort Study is a prospective longitudinal study performed among inhabitants aged 20–59 years of Doetinchem, a town in a rural area in the Netherlands. The aim of the Doetinchem Cohort Study is to study the impact of (changes in) lifestyle factors and biological risk factors on aspects of health. Participants were randomly selected from an age- and sex-stratified sample from the civil registries of the town of Doetinchem. At baseline (1987–1991: round 1), 20155 persons were invited to visit the municipal health centre to participate in the ‘Monitoring Project on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors’. The participation rate was 62% (12439 participants). In 1993–1998 (round 2), a random sample of 7769 persons was re-invited. Not all participants could be invited due to logistic reasons. In 1998–2002 (round 3) and 2003–2007 (round 4), those who were invited in round 2 were invited again, excluding those who emigrated, actively withdrew from the study or died. Interval between the first and second round was 6 years and interval between each follow-up was 5 years. However, we refer to 5 year intervals for all consecutive measurements for simplicity. The response rates for all follow-up measurements varied between 75% and 80%, resulting in 6118, 4917 and 4521 participants for round 2, 3 and 4, respectively. In the present analyses, we included the participants with data on at least one set of weight change over 5 years and the corresponding number of MetS components. For example, one set is the weight change between round 1 and 2 and the number of MetS components in round 2 (see Fig. 1). Those who reported to have (had) cancer (N = 401) were excluded from the analysis because of the potential weight loss associated with this disease. In addition, those who were pregnant during a measurement round were excluded for that specific measurement round (N = 16), resulting in 5735 participants to be included in the analysis. We certify that all applicable institutional and governmental regulations concerning the ethical use of human volunteers were followed during this research. The study was approved according to the guidelines of the Helsinki Declaration by the external Medical Ethics Committee of the Netherlands Organization of Applied Scientific Research (TNO).Fig. 1


Weight change over five-year periods and number of components of the metabolic syndrome in a Dutch cohort.

Bot M, Spijkerman AM, Twisk JW, Verschuren WM - Eur. J. Epidemiol. (2010)

Overview of analyses of 5 year weight change and number of components of the MetS. Weight change is measured between round 1 and 2 and associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 2 (white arrows and white box). Weight change between round 2 and 3 was associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 3 (gray arrows and gray box). Weight change between round 3 and 4 was associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 4 (black arrows and black box). These three sets of data were stacked and jointly analyzed with GEE
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821620&req=5

Fig1: Overview of analyses of 5 year weight change and number of components of the MetS. Weight change is measured between round 1 and 2 and associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 2 (white arrows and white box). Weight change between round 2 and 3 was associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 3 (gray arrows and gray box). Weight change between round 3 and 4 was associated with the number of components of the MetS in round 4 (black arrows and black box). These three sets of data were stacked and jointly analyzed with GEE
Mentions: The study design is previously described elsewhere [24]. In brief, the Doetinchem Cohort Study is a prospective longitudinal study performed among inhabitants aged 20–59 years of Doetinchem, a town in a rural area in the Netherlands. The aim of the Doetinchem Cohort Study is to study the impact of (changes in) lifestyle factors and biological risk factors on aspects of health. Participants were randomly selected from an age- and sex-stratified sample from the civil registries of the town of Doetinchem. At baseline (1987–1991: round 1), 20155 persons were invited to visit the municipal health centre to participate in the ‘Monitoring Project on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors’. The participation rate was 62% (12439 participants). In 1993–1998 (round 2), a random sample of 7769 persons was re-invited. Not all participants could be invited due to logistic reasons. In 1998–2002 (round 3) and 2003–2007 (round 4), those who were invited in round 2 were invited again, excluding those who emigrated, actively withdrew from the study or died. Interval between the first and second round was 6 years and interval between each follow-up was 5 years. However, we refer to 5 year intervals for all consecutive measurements for simplicity. The response rates for all follow-up measurements varied between 75% and 80%, resulting in 6118, 4917 and 4521 participants for round 2, 3 and 4, respectively. In the present analyses, we included the participants with data on at least one set of weight change over 5 years and the corresponding number of MetS components. For example, one set is the weight change between round 1 and 2 and the number of MetS components in round 2 (see Fig. 1). Those who reported to have (had) cancer (N = 401) were excluded from the analysis because of the potential weight loss associated with this disease. In addition, those who were pregnant during a measurement round were excluded for that specific measurement round (N = 16), resulting in 5735 participants to be included in the analysis. We certify that all applicable institutional and governmental regulations concerning the ethical use of human volunteers were followed during this research. The study was approved according to the guidelines of the Helsinki Declaration by the external Medical Ethics Committee of the Netherlands Organization of Applied Scientific Research (TNO).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Weight was measured in round 1 and at each 5-year interval follow-up (round 2, 3 and 4).Weight change was defined as the absolute weight change between two consecutive measurements.The association was stronger in 30-39 years (adjusted rate ratio: 1.044; 95%CI: 1.040-1.049) and smaller in older age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. m.bot@uvt.nl

ABSTRACT
Overweight and obesity are associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We studied the association of weight change over three consecutive 5-year periods with the number of MetS components in people aged 20-59 years. 5735 participants from the Doetinchem Cohort Study were included. Weight was measured in round 1 and at each 5-year interval follow-up (round 2, 3 and 4). Weight change was defined as the absolute weight change between two consecutive measurements. The number of MetS components (assessed in round 2, 3 and 4) was based on the presence of the following components of the MetS: central obesity, raised blood pressure, reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated glucose. Associations of weight change and the number of components of the MetS were analyzed with Generalized Estimating Equations for Poisson regression, stratified for 10-year age groups. For each age group, 1 kg weight gain was positively associated with the number of components of the MetS, independent of sex and measurement round. The association was stronger in 30-39 years (adjusted rate ratio: 1.044; 95%CI: 1.040-1.049) and smaller in older age groups. Compared to stable weight (>-2.5 kg and < 2.5 kg), weight loss (< or = -2.5 kg) and weight gain (> or =2.5 kg) was associated with a lower and higher rate ratio respectively, for the number of components of the MetS. Our results support the independent association of weight change with the number of MetS components with a more pronounced association in younger people.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus