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Pathways of abdominal tumour spread: the role of the subperitoneal space.

Gore RM, Newmark GM, Thakrar KH, Mehta UK, Berlin JW - Cancer Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: This space is formed by the subserosal areolar tissue that lines the inner surfaces of the peritoneum and the musculature of the abdomen and pelvis.It contains the branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems that supply the viscera.The subperitoneal space extends into the peritoneal cavity and is invested between the layers of the mesenteries and ligaments that support and interconnect the abdominal and pelvic organs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, North Shore University Health System, University of Chicago, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. rgore@uchicago.edu

ABSTRACT
The subperitoneal space is a large, unifying, anatomically continuous potential space that connects the peritoneal cavity with the retroperitoneum. This space is formed by the subserosal areolar tissue that lines the inner surfaces of the peritoneum and the musculature of the abdomen and pelvis. It contains the branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems that supply the viscera. The subperitoneal space extends into the peritoneal cavity and is invested between the layers of the mesenteries and ligaments that support and interconnect the abdominal and pelvic organs. As such, it provides one large continuous space in which infectious, neoplastic, inflammatory, and hemorrhagic disease may spread in many directions.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Gastric cancer spread to the spleen via the gastrosplenic ligament. The subperitoneal space of the gastrosplenic ligament (arrows) is serving as a conduit of tumour spread in this patient with adenocarcinoma of the greater curvature of the stomach.
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Figure 5: Gastric cancer spread to the spleen via the gastrosplenic ligament. The subperitoneal space of the gastrosplenic ligament (arrows) is serving as a conduit of tumour spread in this patient with adenocarcinoma of the greater curvature of the stomach.

Mentions: The gastrosplenic ligament is formed by the left lateral extension of the peritoneal layers of the greater omentum and connects the greater curvature of the stomach with the splenic hilum. It contains the left gastroepiploic and short gastric vessels. The gastrosplenic ligament provides a pathway for spread of disease between the pancreatic tail, the spleen, and the stomach. Carcinoma of the stomach may spread to the splenic hilum along this ligament. Similarly, carcinoma of the pancreatic tail can spread to the stomach by invading first the splenic hilum and subsequently the stomach via the gastrosplenic ligament. The pancreatic tail borders this ligament, so this is a fairly frequent site of pseudocyst formation (Fig. 5). Benign gastric ulcers may penetrate into the spleen via this ligament as well[2–4,6,26].Figure 5


Pathways of abdominal tumour spread: the role of the subperitoneal space.

Gore RM, Newmark GM, Thakrar KH, Mehta UK, Berlin JW - Cancer Imaging (2009)

Gastric cancer spread to the spleen via the gastrosplenic ligament. The subperitoneal space of the gastrosplenic ligament (arrows) is serving as a conduit of tumour spread in this patient with adenocarcinoma of the greater curvature of the stomach.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821589&req=5

Figure 5: Gastric cancer spread to the spleen via the gastrosplenic ligament. The subperitoneal space of the gastrosplenic ligament (arrows) is serving as a conduit of tumour spread in this patient with adenocarcinoma of the greater curvature of the stomach.
Mentions: The gastrosplenic ligament is formed by the left lateral extension of the peritoneal layers of the greater omentum and connects the greater curvature of the stomach with the splenic hilum. It contains the left gastroepiploic and short gastric vessels. The gastrosplenic ligament provides a pathway for spread of disease between the pancreatic tail, the spleen, and the stomach. Carcinoma of the stomach may spread to the splenic hilum along this ligament. Similarly, carcinoma of the pancreatic tail can spread to the stomach by invading first the splenic hilum and subsequently the stomach via the gastrosplenic ligament. The pancreatic tail borders this ligament, so this is a fairly frequent site of pseudocyst formation (Fig. 5). Benign gastric ulcers may penetrate into the spleen via this ligament as well[2–4,6,26].Figure 5

Bottom Line: This space is formed by the subserosal areolar tissue that lines the inner surfaces of the peritoneum and the musculature of the abdomen and pelvis.It contains the branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems that supply the viscera.The subperitoneal space extends into the peritoneal cavity and is invested between the layers of the mesenteries and ligaments that support and interconnect the abdominal and pelvic organs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, North Shore University Health System, University of Chicago, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. rgore@uchicago.edu

ABSTRACT
The subperitoneal space is a large, unifying, anatomically continuous potential space that connects the peritoneal cavity with the retroperitoneum. This space is formed by the subserosal areolar tissue that lines the inner surfaces of the peritoneum and the musculature of the abdomen and pelvis. It contains the branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems that supply the viscera. The subperitoneal space extends into the peritoneal cavity and is invested between the layers of the mesenteries and ligaments that support and interconnect the abdominal and pelvic organs. As such, it provides one large continuous space in which infectious, neoplastic, inflammatory, and hemorrhagic disease may spread in many directions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus