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Pathways of abdominal tumour spread: the role of the subperitoneal space.

Gore RM, Newmark GM, Thakrar KH, Mehta UK, Berlin JW - Cancer Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: This space is formed by the subserosal areolar tissue that lines the inner surfaces of the peritoneum and the musculature of the abdomen and pelvis.It contains the branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems that supply the viscera.The subperitoneal space extends into the peritoneal cavity and is invested between the layers of the mesenteries and ligaments that support and interconnect the abdominal and pelvic organs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, North Shore University Health System, University of Chicago, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. rgore@uchicago.edu

ABSTRACT
The subperitoneal space is a large, unifying, anatomically continuous potential space that connects the peritoneal cavity with the retroperitoneum. This space is formed by the subserosal areolar tissue that lines the inner surfaces of the peritoneum and the musculature of the abdomen and pelvis. It contains the branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems that supply the viscera. The subperitoneal space extends into the peritoneal cavity and is invested between the layers of the mesenteries and ligaments that support and interconnect the abdominal and pelvic organs. As such, it provides one large continuous space in which infectious, neoplastic, inflammatory, and hemorrhagic disease may spread in many directions.

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Spread of gastric cancer into the gastrohepatic ligament. Coronal reformatted CT image shows tumour invasion of the gastrohepatic ligament (black arrow). Peritoneal tumour implants (white arrows) are identified as well.
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Figure 4: Spread of gastric cancer into the gastrohepatic ligament. Coronal reformatted CT image shows tumour invasion of the gastrohepatic ligament (black arrow). Peritoneal tumour implants (white arrows) are identified as well.

Mentions: Gastric cancers often spread first to the lymph nodes in the gastrohepatic ligament (Fig. 4). The left gastric nodes also receive direct lymphatic drainage from the distal oesophagus, so neoplasms in this region may produce gastrohepatic ligament adenopathy. Because the gastrohepatic ligament is contiguous with the hepatoduodenal ligament, adenopathy may occur in the porta hepatis and the peripancreatic area secondary to spread of a gastric neoplasm. Direct spread of fundal gastric malignancies into the left hepatic lobe occurs via this ligament and Glisson capsule[4]. Infectious, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders of the liver often cause adenopathy in the gastrohepatic and gastroduodenal ligaments. Lymphoma and carcinoma of the breast, lung, and oesophagus may spread to the same ligament.Figure 4


Pathways of abdominal tumour spread: the role of the subperitoneal space.

Gore RM, Newmark GM, Thakrar KH, Mehta UK, Berlin JW - Cancer Imaging (2009)

Spread of gastric cancer into the gastrohepatic ligament. Coronal reformatted CT image shows tumour invasion of the gastrohepatic ligament (black arrow). Peritoneal tumour implants (white arrows) are identified as well.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821589&req=5

Figure 4: Spread of gastric cancer into the gastrohepatic ligament. Coronal reformatted CT image shows tumour invasion of the gastrohepatic ligament (black arrow). Peritoneal tumour implants (white arrows) are identified as well.
Mentions: Gastric cancers often spread first to the lymph nodes in the gastrohepatic ligament (Fig. 4). The left gastric nodes also receive direct lymphatic drainage from the distal oesophagus, so neoplasms in this region may produce gastrohepatic ligament adenopathy. Because the gastrohepatic ligament is contiguous with the hepatoduodenal ligament, adenopathy may occur in the porta hepatis and the peripancreatic area secondary to spread of a gastric neoplasm. Direct spread of fundal gastric malignancies into the left hepatic lobe occurs via this ligament and Glisson capsule[4]. Infectious, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorders of the liver often cause adenopathy in the gastrohepatic and gastroduodenal ligaments. Lymphoma and carcinoma of the breast, lung, and oesophagus may spread to the same ligament.Figure 4

Bottom Line: This space is formed by the subserosal areolar tissue that lines the inner surfaces of the peritoneum and the musculature of the abdomen and pelvis.It contains the branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems that supply the viscera.The subperitoneal space extends into the peritoneal cavity and is invested between the layers of the mesenteries and ligaments that support and interconnect the abdominal and pelvic organs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, North Shore University Health System, University of Chicago, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. rgore@uchicago.edu

ABSTRACT
The subperitoneal space is a large, unifying, anatomically continuous potential space that connects the peritoneal cavity with the retroperitoneum. This space is formed by the subserosal areolar tissue that lines the inner surfaces of the peritoneum and the musculature of the abdomen and pelvis. It contains the branches of the vascular, lymphatic, and nervous systems that supply the viscera. The subperitoneal space extends into the peritoneal cavity and is invested between the layers of the mesenteries and ligaments that support and interconnect the abdominal and pelvic organs. As such, it provides one large continuous space in which infectious, neoplastic, inflammatory, and hemorrhagic disease may spread in many directions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus