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Spontaneous rupture of a large non-parasitic liver cyst: a case report.

Miliadis L, Giannakopoulos T, Boutsikos G, Terzis I, Kyriazanos ID - J Med Case Rep (2010)

Bottom Line: Non-parasitic hepatic cysts are benign entities, occur rarely (5% of the population), and in the majority of cases, are asymptomatic.Cysts can cause symptoms when they become large and produce bile duct compression or portal hypertension, and also when complications such as rupture, infection or hemorrhage take place.We present an extremely rare complication of simple liver cyst, its rupture in the free abdominal cavity, and its presentation as an acute abdomen.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Naval and Veterans Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Non-parasitic hepatic cysts are benign entities, occur rarely (5% of the population), and in the majority of cases, are asymptomatic. Cysts can cause symptoms when they become large and produce bile duct compression or portal hypertension, and also when complications such as rupture, infection or hemorrhage take place.

Case presentation: We present the case of a 70-year-old Greek-Caucasian man with a large, asymptomatic and non-parasitic liver cyst that presented as an acute surgical abdominal emergency after spontaneous rupture into the peritoneal cavity.

Conclusions: We present an extremely rare complication of simple liver cyst, its rupture in the free abdominal cavity, and its presentation as an acute abdomen. Large simple liver cysts should be treated with intervention at early recognition as conservative management usually results in their recurrence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Appearance via ultrasonography of simple liver cysts two years before the patient's latest admission.
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Figure 1: Appearance via ultrasonography of simple liver cysts two years before the patient's latest admission.

Mentions: The patient's medical history included colonic diverticular disease, an endoscopic excision of benign rectal polyps four years prior to his presentation, and ongoing arterial hypertension and osteoporosis treatment. Ten years prior to presentation in a random ultrasound examination, the patient was found to have several simple liver cysts including two large hepatic cysts and other smaller ones. The largest cyst had a size of 13 cm. At the time, his pancreas, spleen and kidneys were normal (Figures 1 and 2). A second ultrasound examination was performed nine years after the first one (and just 13 months prior to his present admission) due to the patient being admitted after an accidental fall. A reduction in the size of the largest cyst form 13 cm to 4.6 cm and a small amount of free liquid in the patient's right abdominal fossa were identified as the only difference from the previous ultrasound report.


Spontaneous rupture of a large non-parasitic liver cyst: a case report.

Miliadis L, Giannakopoulos T, Boutsikos G, Terzis I, Kyriazanos ID - J Med Case Rep (2010)

Appearance via ultrasonography of simple liver cysts two years before the patient's latest admission.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821393&req=5

Figure 1: Appearance via ultrasonography of simple liver cysts two years before the patient's latest admission.
Mentions: The patient's medical history included colonic diverticular disease, an endoscopic excision of benign rectal polyps four years prior to his presentation, and ongoing arterial hypertension and osteoporosis treatment. Ten years prior to presentation in a random ultrasound examination, the patient was found to have several simple liver cysts including two large hepatic cysts and other smaller ones. The largest cyst had a size of 13 cm. At the time, his pancreas, spleen and kidneys were normal (Figures 1 and 2). A second ultrasound examination was performed nine years after the first one (and just 13 months prior to his present admission) due to the patient being admitted after an accidental fall. A reduction in the size of the largest cyst form 13 cm to 4.6 cm and a small amount of free liquid in the patient's right abdominal fossa were identified as the only difference from the previous ultrasound report.

Bottom Line: Non-parasitic hepatic cysts are benign entities, occur rarely (5% of the population), and in the majority of cases, are asymptomatic.Cysts can cause symptoms when they become large and produce bile duct compression or portal hypertension, and also when complications such as rupture, infection or hemorrhage take place.We present an extremely rare complication of simple liver cyst, its rupture in the free abdominal cavity, and its presentation as an acute abdomen.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Naval and Veterans Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Non-parasitic hepatic cysts are benign entities, occur rarely (5% of the population), and in the majority of cases, are asymptomatic. Cysts can cause symptoms when they become large and produce bile duct compression or portal hypertension, and also when complications such as rupture, infection or hemorrhage take place.

Case presentation: We present the case of a 70-year-old Greek-Caucasian man with a large, asymptomatic and non-parasitic liver cyst that presented as an acute surgical abdominal emergency after spontaneous rupture into the peritoneal cavity.

Conclusions: We present an extremely rare complication of simple liver cyst, its rupture in the free abdominal cavity, and its presentation as an acute abdomen. Large simple liver cysts should be treated with intervention at early recognition as conservative management usually results in their recurrence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus