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Cross-cultural adaptation and patients' judgments of a question prompt list for Italian-speaking cancer patients.

Caminiti C, Diodati F, Filiberti S, Marcomini B, Annunziata MA, Ollari M, Passalacqua R - BMC Health Serv Res (2010)

Bottom Line: Most volunteer patients felt that the questionnaire was adequate, easy to understand and useful.Only a few minor criticisms were expressed.Certain questions on diagnosis and prognosis generated the highest level of anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research & Innovation Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Italy. ccaminiti@ao.pr.it

ABSTRACT

Background: Question Prompt Lists (QPLs) have proven very effective in encouraging cancer patients to ask questions, allowing them to take up a more active role during visits with the oncologist. As no such tool has yet been validated for Italian-speaking users, we carried out the cross-cultural adaptation and evaluation of an existing Australian Question Prompt List.

Methods: Cross-cultural adaptation was performed in accordance with the five steps described by Guillemin and Beaton. Forward and back translations of the original tool were carried out, and the products discussed by an Expert Committee who agreed on a prefinal version of the Italian QPL, which was submitted to 30 volunteer patients for evaluation. They rated each question's adequacy of content, clarity of wording, usefulness, and generated anxiety, on a 3-point Likert scale. Based on the analysis of patient ratings, the final version of the Italian QPL was produced.

Results: Few discrepancies between the two back translations and the original version of the instrument were noted, indicating that the Italian translation (synthesis of the 2 forward translations) was substantially accurate. Most volunteer patients felt that the questionnaire was adequate, easy to understand and useful. Only a few minor criticisms were expressed. Certain questions on diagnosis and prognosis generated the highest level of anxiety. Patient comments and ratings on clarity highlighted the need to clarify common health care terms which are not widely used by the public (i.e. guideline, multidisciplinary team and clinical trial)

Conclusions: This cross-cultural adaptation has produced an Italian Question Prompt List that is now available for multi-center international studies and can be safely used with Italian-speaking cancer patients.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Adequacy. Patient ratings on adequacy of content of each question, expressed on a 3-point Likert scale.
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Figure 1: Adequacy. Patient ratings on adequacy of content of each question, expressed on a 3-point Likert scale.

Mentions: Descriptive analysis of patient feedback (stage V) was carried out, considering the scores attributed to each item of the QPL. To facilitate comprehension, and highlight differences, frequencies were displayed by means of histograms (Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4). 50% cut offs were considered as significant for analysis by the Committee.


Cross-cultural adaptation and patients' judgments of a question prompt list for Italian-speaking cancer patients.

Caminiti C, Diodati F, Filiberti S, Marcomini B, Annunziata MA, Ollari M, Passalacqua R - BMC Health Serv Res (2010)

Adequacy. Patient ratings on adequacy of content of each question, expressed on a 3-point Likert scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821383&req=5

Figure 1: Adequacy. Patient ratings on adequacy of content of each question, expressed on a 3-point Likert scale.
Mentions: Descriptive analysis of patient feedback (stage V) was carried out, considering the scores attributed to each item of the QPL. To facilitate comprehension, and highlight differences, frequencies were displayed by means of histograms (Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4). 50% cut offs were considered as significant for analysis by the Committee.

Bottom Line: Most volunteer patients felt that the questionnaire was adequate, easy to understand and useful.Only a few minor criticisms were expressed.Certain questions on diagnosis and prognosis generated the highest level of anxiety.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research & Innovation Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Italy. ccaminiti@ao.pr.it

ABSTRACT

Background: Question Prompt Lists (QPLs) have proven very effective in encouraging cancer patients to ask questions, allowing them to take up a more active role during visits with the oncologist. As no such tool has yet been validated for Italian-speaking users, we carried out the cross-cultural adaptation and evaluation of an existing Australian Question Prompt List.

Methods: Cross-cultural adaptation was performed in accordance with the five steps described by Guillemin and Beaton. Forward and back translations of the original tool were carried out, and the products discussed by an Expert Committee who agreed on a prefinal version of the Italian QPL, which was submitted to 30 volunteer patients for evaluation. They rated each question's adequacy of content, clarity of wording, usefulness, and generated anxiety, on a 3-point Likert scale. Based on the analysis of patient ratings, the final version of the Italian QPL was produced.

Results: Few discrepancies between the two back translations and the original version of the instrument were noted, indicating that the Italian translation (synthesis of the 2 forward translations) was substantially accurate. Most volunteer patients felt that the questionnaire was adequate, easy to understand and useful. Only a few minor criticisms were expressed. Certain questions on diagnosis and prognosis generated the highest level of anxiety. Patient comments and ratings on clarity highlighted the need to clarify common health care terms which are not widely used by the public (i.e. guideline, multidisciplinary team and clinical trial)

Conclusions: This cross-cultural adaptation has produced an Italian Question Prompt List that is now available for multi-center international studies and can be safely used with Italian-speaking cancer patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus