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Introducing a feedback training system for guided home rehabilitation.

Kohler F, Schmitz-Rode T, Disselhorst-Klug C - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2010)

Bottom Line: As the number of people requiring orthopaedic intervention is growing, individualized physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and adequate postoperative care becomes increasingly relevant.The chances of improvement in the patients condition is directly related to the performance and consistency of the physiotherapeutic exercises.In this paper a smart, cost-effective and easy to use Feedback Training System for home rehabilitation based on standard resistive elements is introduced.Thus physiotherapeutic training can be extended into the home environment whilst ensuring a high quality of training.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept of Rehabilitation- and Prevention Engineering, Institute of Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Helmholtz Institute, Pauwelsstr 20, Aachen, 52074, Germany. kohler@hia.rwth-aachen.de

ABSTRACT
As the number of people requiring orthopaedic intervention is growing, individualized physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and adequate postoperative care becomes increasingly relevant. The chances of improvement in the patients condition is directly related to the performance and consistency of the physiotherapeutic exercises.In this paper a smart, cost-effective and easy to use Feedback Training System for home rehabilitation based on standard resistive elements is introduced. This ensures high accuracy of the exercises performed and offers guidance and control to the patient by offering direct feedback about the performance of the movements.46 patients were recruited and performed standard physiotherapeutic training to evaluate the system. The results show a significant increase in the patient's ability to reproduce even simple physiotherapeutic exercises when being supported by the Feedback Training System. Thus physiotherapeutic training can be extended into the home environment whilst ensuring a high quality of training.

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Movement Patterns: (a) Abduction-Adduction of the right arm and (b) diagonal PNF Pattern of the right arm.
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Figure 5: Movement Patterns: (a) Abduction-Adduction of the right arm and (b) diagonal PNF Pattern of the right arm.

Mentions: All subjects were right handed and held the handle of the training device with the right hand and pulled against resistance while the other end was connected to the foot (Figure 5). The occurring forces were between 18N and 24N for all subjects. For each subject it was decided randomly if a either an abduction/adduction movement or a diagonal PNF pattern should be performed. All subjects were measured in 2 sets of 12 repetitions. The abduction/adduction movement begins with a horizontally extended arm and with dextrally rotated hand. The arm is then elevated and moved circularly around the shoulder joint above the head. The PNF diagonal begins with sinistral rotated stretched out arm that is held proximal in front of the body. Then the arm is moved diagonal to a distal position over the head on the right side while performing a supination in the elbow at the same time, what leads to a dextral Orientation of the hand (Figure 5). The movement patterns were taught directly prior to the measurements. Both groups were treated in the exact same way. The only difference was that one group was provided with additional visual feedback (Feedback-Group) and the other group had to perform without visual feedback (Control-Group).


Introducing a feedback training system for guided home rehabilitation.

Kohler F, Schmitz-Rode T, Disselhorst-Klug C - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2010)

Movement Patterns: (a) Abduction-Adduction of the right arm and (b) diagonal PNF Pattern of the right arm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821380&req=5

Figure 5: Movement Patterns: (a) Abduction-Adduction of the right arm and (b) diagonal PNF Pattern of the right arm.
Mentions: All subjects were right handed and held the handle of the training device with the right hand and pulled against resistance while the other end was connected to the foot (Figure 5). The occurring forces were between 18N and 24N for all subjects. For each subject it was decided randomly if a either an abduction/adduction movement or a diagonal PNF pattern should be performed. All subjects were measured in 2 sets of 12 repetitions. The abduction/adduction movement begins with a horizontally extended arm and with dextrally rotated hand. The arm is then elevated and moved circularly around the shoulder joint above the head. The PNF diagonal begins with sinistral rotated stretched out arm that is held proximal in front of the body. Then the arm is moved diagonal to a distal position over the head on the right side while performing a supination in the elbow at the same time, what leads to a dextral Orientation of the hand (Figure 5). The movement patterns were taught directly prior to the measurements. Both groups were treated in the exact same way. The only difference was that one group was provided with additional visual feedback (Feedback-Group) and the other group had to perform without visual feedback (Control-Group).

Bottom Line: As the number of people requiring orthopaedic intervention is growing, individualized physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and adequate postoperative care becomes increasingly relevant.The chances of improvement in the patients condition is directly related to the performance and consistency of the physiotherapeutic exercises.In this paper a smart, cost-effective and easy to use Feedback Training System for home rehabilitation based on standard resistive elements is introduced.Thus physiotherapeutic training can be extended into the home environment whilst ensuring a high quality of training.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept of Rehabilitation- and Prevention Engineering, Institute of Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Helmholtz Institute, Pauwelsstr 20, Aachen, 52074, Germany. kohler@hia.rwth-aachen.de

ABSTRACT
As the number of people requiring orthopaedic intervention is growing, individualized physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and adequate postoperative care becomes increasingly relevant. The chances of improvement in the patients condition is directly related to the performance and consistency of the physiotherapeutic exercises.In this paper a smart, cost-effective and easy to use Feedback Training System for home rehabilitation based on standard resistive elements is introduced. This ensures high accuracy of the exercises performed and offers guidance and control to the patient by offering direct feedback about the performance of the movements.46 patients were recruited and performed standard physiotherapeutic training to evaluate the system. The results show a significant increase in the patient's ability to reproduce even simple physiotherapeutic exercises when being supported by the Feedback Training System. Thus physiotherapeutic training can be extended into the home environment whilst ensuring a high quality of training.

Show MeSH