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Partner notification for sexually transmitted infections in developing countries: a systematic review.

Alam N, Chamot E, Vermund SH, Streatfield K, Kristensen S - BMC Public Health (2010)

Bottom Line: Client-oriented counselling was found to be effective in improving partner referral outcomes.STD clinics can improve PN with client-oriented counselling, which should help clients to overcome perceived barriers.The authors speculate that well-designed PN interventions to evaluate the impact on STI prevalence and incidence along with cost-effectiveness components will motivate policy makers in developing countries to allocate more resources towards STI management.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: ICDDR, B: Centre for Health and Population Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT

Background: The feasibility and acceptability of partner notification (PN) for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in developing countries was assessed through a comprehensive literature review, to help identify future intervention needs.

Methods: The Medline, Embase, and Google Scholar databases were searched to identify studies published between January 1995 and December 2007 on STI PN in developing countries. A systematic review of the research extracted information on: (1) willingness of index patients to notify partners; (2) the proportion of partners notified or referred; (3) client-reported barriers in notifying partners; (4) infrastructure barriers in notifying partners; and (5) PN approaches that were evaluated in developing countries.

Results: Out of 609 screened articles, 39 met our criteria. PN outcome varied widely and was implemented more often for spousal partners than for casual or commercial partners. Reported barriers included sociocultural factors such as stigma, fear of abuse for having an STI, and infrastructural factors related to the limited number of STD clinics, and trained providers and reliable diagnostic methods. Client-oriented counselling was found to be effective in improving partner referral outcomes.

Conclusions: STD clinics can improve PN with client-oriented counselling, which should help clients to overcome perceived barriers. The authors speculate that well-designed PN interventions to evaluate the impact on STI prevalence and incidence along with cost-effectiveness components will motivate policy makers in developing countries to allocate more resources towards STI management.

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Systematic review of published studies of perspectives and experiences with partner notification for sexually transmitted infections in developing countries.
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Figure 1: Systematic review of published studies of perspectives and experiences with partner notification for sexually transmitted infections in developing countries.

Mentions: From 609 articles (474 unique: not overlapped across search data bases), 372 were from Medline, 138 from Embase (Scirus), and 99 from Google scholar data base. After the selection process (Figure 1), we identified 39 articles for this review, 28 from Africa, 6 from Asia and 5 from Latin American or Caribbean countries (Table 1 and 2). Studies had diverse study designs and populations. Only three studies were randomized trials [14,15,22]. Five studies collected data from women in antenatal clinics [23-26] or in home-based STI screening programs [27]. Four studies were pre-test post-test evaluation [10,27-30], five studies solely utilized qualitative design for data collection [15,24,31-33]. Other studies had either cross sectional design, observation or descriptive design and prospective follow-up design (Table 1 and 2). Two studies focused on men in STD clinics in China [19,34] and three studies collected data from STI service providers [30,35,36]. Other population covered in the studies included men and women from general population, pregnant women in antenatal clinics and medicine sellers. According to our quality assessment criteria, 32 articles were found to be of moderate quality, 7 were lower uality and none satisfy to be graded as higher quality.


Partner notification for sexually transmitted infections in developing countries: a systematic review.

Alam N, Chamot E, Vermund SH, Streatfield K, Kristensen S - BMC Public Health (2010)

Systematic review of published studies of perspectives and experiences with partner notification for sexually transmitted infections in developing countries.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821362&req=5

Figure 1: Systematic review of published studies of perspectives and experiences with partner notification for sexually transmitted infections in developing countries.
Mentions: From 609 articles (474 unique: not overlapped across search data bases), 372 were from Medline, 138 from Embase (Scirus), and 99 from Google scholar data base. After the selection process (Figure 1), we identified 39 articles for this review, 28 from Africa, 6 from Asia and 5 from Latin American or Caribbean countries (Table 1 and 2). Studies had diverse study designs and populations. Only three studies were randomized trials [14,15,22]. Five studies collected data from women in antenatal clinics [23-26] or in home-based STI screening programs [27]. Four studies were pre-test post-test evaluation [10,27-30], five studies solely utilized qualitative design for data collection [15,24,31-33]. Other studies had either cross sectional design, observation or descriptive design and prospective follow-up design (Table 1 and 2). Two studies focused on men in STD clinics in China [19,34] and three studies collected data from STI service providers [30,35,36]. Other population covered in the studies included men and women from general population, pregnant women in antenatal clinics and medicine sellers. According to our quality assessment criteria, 32 articles were found to be of moderate quality, 7 were lower uality and none satisfy to be graded as higher quality.

Bottom Line: Client-oriented counselling was found to be effective in improving partner referral outcomes.STD clinics can improve PN with client-oriented counselling, which should help clients to overcome perceived barriers.The authors speculate that well-designed PN interventions to evaluate the impact on STI prevalence and incidence along with cost-effectiveness components will motivate policy makers in developing countries to allocate more resources towards STI management.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: ICDDR, B: Centre for Health and Population Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT

Background: The feasibility and acceptability of partner notification (PN) for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in developing countries was assessed through a comprehensive literature review, to help identify future intervention needs.

Methods: The Medline, Embase, and Google Scholar databases were searched to identify studies published between January 1995 and December 2007 on STI PN in developing countries. A systematic review of the research extracted information on: (1) willingness of index patients to notify partners; (2) the proportion of partners notified or referred; (3) client-reported barriers in notifying partners; (4) infrastructure barriers in notifying partners; and (5) PN approaches that were evaluated in developing countries.

Results: Out of 609 screened articles, 39 met our criteria. PN outcome varied widely and was implemented more often for spousal partners than for casual or commercial partners. Reported barriers included sociocultural factors such as stigma, fear of abuse for having an STI, and infrastructural factors related to the limited number of STD clinics, and trained providers and reliable diagnostic methods. Client-oriented counselling was found to be effective in improving partner referral outcomes.

Conclusions: STD clinics can improve PN with client-oriented counselling, which should help clients to overcome perceived barriers. The authors speculate that well-designed PN interventions to evaluate the impact on STI prevalence and incidence along with cost-effectiveness components will motivate policy makers in developing countries to allocate more resources towards STI management.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus