Limits...
Predictive value of progression-related gene classifier in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

Kim WJ, Kim EJ, Kim SK, Kim YJ, Ha YS, Jeong P, Kim MJ, Yun SJ, Lee KM, Moon SK, Lee SC, Cha EJ, Bae SC - Mol. Cancer (2010)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, no patient with NMIBC in the good-prognosis signature group experienced cancer progression.We identified progression-related gene classifier that has strong predictive value for determining disease outcome in NMIBC.This gene classifier could assist in selecting NMIBC patients who might benefit from more aggressive therapeutic intervention or surveillance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Chungbuk, South Korea. wjkim@chungbuk.ac.kr

ABSTRACT

Background: While several molecular markers of bladder cancer prognosis have been identified, the limited value of current prognostic markers has created the need for new molecular indicators of bladder cancer outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify genetic signatures associated with disease prognosis in bladder cancer.

Results: We used 272 primary bladder cancer specimens for microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Microarray gene expression analysis of randomly selected 165 primary bladder cancer specimens as an original cohort was carried out. Risk scores were applied to stratify prognosis-related gene classifiers. Prognosis-related gene classifiers were individually analyzed with tumor invasiveness (non-muscle invasive bladder cancer [NMIBC] and muscle invasive bladder cancer [MIBC]) and prognosis. We validated selected gene classifiers using RT-PCR in the original (165) and independent (107) cohorts. Ninety-seven genes related to disease progression among NMIBC patients were identified by microarray data analysis. Eight genes, a progression-related gene classifier in NMIBC, were selected for RT-PCR. The progression-related gene classifier in patients with NMIBC was closely correlated with progression in both original and independent cohorts. Furthermore, no patient with NMIBC in the good-prognosis signature group experienced cancer progression.

Conclusions: We identified progression-related gene classifier that has strong predictive value for determining disease outcome in NMIBC. This gene classifier could assist in selecting NMIBC patients who might benefit from more aggressive therapeutic intervention or surveillance.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier estimations in primary bladder cancer with gene signatures based on RT-PCR analysis of the independent validation cohort. Kaplan-Meier curves of (A) recurrence and (B) progression in NMIBC, and (C) progression in MIBC.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821358&req=5

Figure 5: Kaplan-Meier estimations in primary bladder cancer with gene signatures based on RT-PCR analysis of the independent validation cohort. Kaplan-Meier curves of (A) recurrence and (B) progression in NMIBC, and (C) progression in MIBC.

Mentions: We used RT-PCR to validate prognosis-related gene classifiers (3 in recurrence-related gene classifier and 8 in progression-related gene classifier for NMIBC and 3 in progression-related gene classifier for MIBC) in an independent cohort of 107 primary bladder cancer patients. As with the original cohort, risk scores were calculated and a median value was used to differentiate the risk groups. For NMIBC, the good-prognosis signature group had a significantly increased time to progression as compared to the poor-prognosis signature group (P < 0.001; Fig. 5B). As with the original cohort, none of the patients with good-prognosis signature were associated with progression for NMIBC. Recurrence-related gene classifier in NMIBC and progression-related gene classifier in MIBC did not uncover any differences in respective time to recurrence and progression between good- and poor-prognosis signature groups in the independent cohort (each P >0.05; Fig. 5A, C).


Predictive value of progression-related gene classifier in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

Kim WJ, Kim EJ, Kim SK, Kim YJ, Ha YS, Jeong P, Kim MJ, Yun SJ, Lee KM, Moon SK, Lee SC, Cha EJ, Bae SC - Mol. Cancer (2010)

Kaplan-Meier estimations in primary bladder cancer with gene signatures based on RT-PCR analysis of the independent validation cohort. Kaplan-Meier curves of (A) recurrence and (B) progression in NMIBC, and (C) progression in MIBC.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821358&req=5

Figure 5: Kaplan-Meier estimations in primary bladder cancer with gene signatures based on RT-PCR analysis of the independent validation cohort. Kaplan-Meier curves of (A) recurrence and (B) progression in NMIBC, and (C) progression in MIBC.
Mentions: We used RT-PCR to validate prognosis-related gene classifiers (3 in recurrence-related gene classifier and 8 in progression-related gene classifier for NMIBC and 3 in progression-related gene classifier for MIBC) in an independent cohort of 107 primary bladder cancer patients. As with the original cohort, risk scores were calculated and a median value was used to differentiate the risk groups. For NMIBC, the good-prognosis signature group had a significantly increased time to progression as compared to the poor-prognosis signature group (P < 0.001; Fig. 5B). As with the original cohort, none of the patients with good-prognosis signature were associated with progression for NMIBC. Recurrence-related gene classifier in NMIBC and progression-related gene classifier in MIBC did not uncover any differences in respective time to recurrence and progression between good- and poor-prognosis signature groups in the independent cohort (each P >0.05; Fig. 5A, C).

Bottom Line: Furthermore, no patient with NMIBC in the good-prognosis signature group experienced cancer progression.We identified progression-related gene classifier that has strong predictive value for determining disease outcome in NMIBC.This gene classifier could assist in selecting NMIBC patients who might benefit from more aggressive therapeutic intervention or surveillance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Chungbuk, South Korea. wjkim@chungbuk.ac.kr

ABSTRACT

Background: While several molecular markers of bladder cancer prognosis have been identified, the limited value of current prognostic markers has created the need for new molecular indicators of bladder cancer outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify genetic signatures associated with disease prognosis in bladder cancer.

Results: We used 272 primary bladder cancer specimens for microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Microarray gene expression analysis of randomly selected 165 primary bladder cancer specimens as an original cohort was carried out. Risk scores were applied to stratify prognosis-related gene classifiers. Prognosis-related gene classifiers were individually analyzed with tumor invasiveness (non-muscle invasive bladder cancer [NMIBC] and muscle invasive bladder cancer [MIBC]) and prognosis. We validated selected gene classifiers using RT-PCR in the original (165) and independent (107) cohorts. Ninety-seven genes related to disease progression among NMIBC patients were identified by microarray data analysis. Eight genes, a progression-related gene classifier in NMIBC, were selected for RT-PCR. The progression-related gene classifier in patients with NMIBC was closely correlated with progression in both original and independent cohorts. Furthermore, no patient with NMIBC in the good-prognosis signature group experienced cancer progression.

Conclusions: We identified progression-related gene classifier that has strong predictive value for determining disease outcome in NMIBC. This gene classifier could assist in selecting NMIBC patients who might benefit from more aggressive therapeutic intervention or surveillance.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus