Limits...
Attentional networks in developmental dyscalculia.

Askenazi S, Henik A - Behav Brain Funct (2010)

Bottom Line: All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence.The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group.They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. ashkenas@bgu.ac.il

ABSTRACT

Background: Very little is known about attention deficits in developmental dyscalculia, hence, this study was designed to provide the missing information. We examined attention abilities of participants suffering from developmental dyscalculia using the attention networks test - interactions. This test was designed to examine three different attention networks--executive function, orienting and alerting--and the interactions between them.

Methods: Fourteen university students that were diagnosed as suffering from developmental dyscalculia--intelligence and reading abilities in the normal range and no indication of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--and 14 matched controls were tested using the attention networks test-interactions. All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence.

Results: The results revealed deficits in the alerting network--a larger alerting effect--and in the executive function networks--a larger congruity effect in developmental dyscalculia participants. The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group. In addition, developmental dyscalculia participants were slower to respond in the non-cued conditions.

Conclusions: These results imply specific attentional deficits in pure developmental dyscalculia. Namely, those with developmental dyscalculia seem to be deficient in the executive function and alertness networks. They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

RTs as a function of group, alertness and congruity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821357&req=5

Figure 1: RTs as a function of group, alertness and congruity.

Mentions: There was no main effect of group but the interaction between group and congruity was significant [F(1, 26) = 5.9, MSE = 3,593, p < 0.05]. The congruity effect (that examined the executive function network) was larger in the developmental dyscalculia group compared to the control group. The interaction between group and alertness was also significant [F(1, 26) = 6.6, MSE = 1,132, p < 0.05]--the tone effect was larger in the developmental dyscalculia group compared to the control group. The interaction between congruency and group was moderated by alertness [F(1, 26) = 4.8, MSE = 277, p < 0.05]. In the no-tone condition, the difference in the congruity effect between the two groups was marginally significant [F(1, 26) = 3.4, MSE = 1,725, p = 0.08], whereas in the tone condition, the difference in the congruity effect between the two groups was significant [F(1, 26) = 7.73, MSE = 1,725, p < 0.01]. That is, the congruity effect of the developmental dyscalculia group was larger than that of the control group regardless of alertness but the difference between the two groups was larger in the tone condition compared to the no-tone condition (see Figure 1).


Attentional networks in developmental dyscalculia.

Askenazi S, Henik A - Behav Brain Funct (2010)

RTs as a function of group, alertness and congruity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821357&req=5

Figure 1: RTs as a function of group, alertness and congruity.
Mentions: There was no main effect of group but the interaction between group and congruity was significant [F(1, 26) = 5.9, MSE = 3,593, p < 0.05]. The congruity effect (that examined the executive function network) was larger in the developmental dyscalculia group compared to the control group. The interaction between group and alertness was also significant [F(1, 26) = 6.6, MSE = 1,132, p < 0.05]--the tone effect was larger in the developmental dyscalculia group compared to the control group. The interaction between congruency and group was moderated by alertness [F(1, 26) = 4.8, MSE = 277, p < 0.05]. In the no-tone condition, the difference in the congruity effect between the two groups was marginally significant [F(1, 26) = 3.4, MSE = 1,725, p = 0.08], whereas in the tone condition, the difference in the congruity effect between the two groups was significant [F(1, 26) = 7.73, MSE = 1,725, p < 0.01]. That is, the congruity effect of the developmental dyscalculia group was larger than that of the control group regardless of alertness but the difference between the two groups was larger in the tone condition compared to the no-tone condition (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence.The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group.They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. ashkenas@bgu.ac.il

ABSTRACT

Background: Very little is known about attention deficits in developmental dyscalculia, hence, this study was designed to provide the missing information. We examined attention abilities of participants suffering from developmental dyscalculia using the attention networks test - interactions. This test was designed to examine three different attention networks--executive function, orienting and alerting--and the interactions between them.

Methods: Fourteen university students that were diagnosed as suffering from developmental dyscalculia--intelligence and reading abilities in the normal range and no indication of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--and 14 matched controls were tested using the attention networks test-interactions. All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence.

Results: The results revealed deficits in the alerting network--a larger alerting effect--and in the executive function networks--a larger congruity effect in developmental dyscalculia participants. The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group. In addition, developmental dyscalculia participants were slower to respond in the non-cued conditions.

Conclusions: These results imply specific attentional deficits in pure developmental dyscalculia. Namely, those with developmental dyscalculia seem to be deficient in the executive function and alertness networks. They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus