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Semantics in the motor system: motor-cortical Beta oscillations reflect semantic knowledge of end-postures for object use.

van Elk M, van Schie HT, van den Heuvel R, Bekkering H - Front Hum Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless compared to a meaningful end posture was accompanied by a stronger beta-desynchronization towards the end of the movement and a stronger subsequent beta-rebound after posture-onset.The effect in the beta-frequency band was localized to premotor, parietal and medial frontal areas and could not be attributed to differences in timing or movement complexity between meaningful and meaningless actions.This suggests that semantic object knowledge is indeed represented in motor-related brain areas, organized around specific end postures associated with the use of objects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Nijmegen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In the present EEG study we investigated whether semantic knowledge for object use is represented in motor-related brain areas. Subjects were required to perform actions with everyday objects and to maintain either a meaningful or a meaningless end posture with the object. Analysis of the EEG data focused on the beta-frequency band, as previous studies have indicated that the maintenance of a posture is reflected in stronger beta-oscillations. Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless compared to a meaningful end posture was accompanied by a stronger beta-desynchronization towards the end of the movement and a stronger subsequent beta-rebound after posture-onset. The effect in the beta-frequency band was localized to premotor, parietal and medial frontal areas and could not be attributed to differences in timing or movement complexity between meaningful and meaningless actions. Together these findings directly show that the motor system is differentially activated during the execution and maintenance of semantically correct or incorrect end postures. This suggests that semantic object knowledge is indeed represented in motor-related brain areas, organized around specific end postures associated with the use of objects.

No MeSH data available.


Beta-rebound during posture maintenance after exclusion of objects. EEG data time-locked to the onset of the end posture after exclusion of objects contributing to slower responding in Meaningless action conditions and objects contributing to faster responding in Meaningful action conditions. (A) Time frequency representations for actions resulting in a meaningful end posture (left graph), a meaningless end posture (middle graph) and the difference between meaningless and meaningful action conditions (right graph). The time-interval and frequency range used for statistical analysis are marked in white. (B) Relative beta-power (16–24 Hz) for actions resulting in a meaningful end posture (blue lines) or a meaningless end posture (red lines).
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Figure 7: Beta-rebound during posture maintenance after exclusion of objects. EEG data time-locked to the onset of the end posture after exclusion of objects contributing to slower responding in Meaningless action conditions and objects contributing to faster responding in Meaningful action conditions. (A) Time frequency representations for actions resulting in a meaningful end posture (left graph), a meaningless end posture (middle graph) and the difference between meaningless and meaningful action conditions (right graph). The time-interval and frequency range used for statistical analysis are marked in white. (B) Relative beta-power (16–24 Hz) for actions resulting in a meaningful end posture (blue lines) or a meaningless end posture (red lines).

Mentions: After meaningful and meaningless action conditions were matched for length of the actions, an additional time-frequency analysis was conducted on the posture interval, ranging from −200 to 4200 ms relative to posture onset4. As can be seen in Figure 7, the onset of the posture resulted in a comparable pattern as was observed for the entire object set, reflecting a gradual increase in beta power (16–24 Hz; post-movement beta rebound) that reached its maximum around 1500 ms after termination of the movement. Differences between meaningful and meaningless postures became apparent in a stronger beta-rebound for meaningless compared to meaningful postures. Statistical analysis of the difference showed a stronger beta-rebound for meaningless compared to meaningful actions from 750 to 1400 ms, from 1900 to 2600 ms, and from 3200 to 3450 ms after posture onset, F(1,11) > 5.1, p < 0.05. An interaction with Hemisphere, indicated that the effect was lateralized to the right hemisphere from 1250 to 1400 ms F(1,11) > 7.5, p < 0.05. Together these findings replicate the main finding and suggest that the stronger beta-rebound for meaningless actions cannot be attributed to differences in the duration of the movements.


Semantics in the motor system: motor-cortical Beta oscillations reflect semantic knowledge of end-postures for object use.

van Elk M, van Schie HT, van den Heuvel R, Bekkering H - Front Hum Neurosci (2010)

Beta-rebound during posture maintenance after exclusion of objects. EEG data time-locked to the onset of the end posture after exclusion of objects contributing to slower responding in Meaningless action conditions and objects contributing to faster responding in Meaningful action conditions. (A) Time frequency representations for actions resulting in a meaningful end posture (left graph), a meaningless end posture (middle graph) and the difference between meaningless and meaningful action conditions (right graph). The time-interval and frequency range used for statistical analysis are marked in white. (B) Relative beta-power (16–24 Hz) for actions resulting in a meaningful end posture (blue lines) or a meaningless end posture (red lines).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 7: Beta-rebound during posture maintenance after exclusion of objects. EEG data time-locked to the onset of the end posture after exclusion of objects contributing to slower responding in Meaningless action conditions and objects contributing to faster responding in Meaningful action conditions. (A) Time frequency representations for actions resulting in a meaningful end posture (left graph), a meaningless end posture (middle graph) and the difference between meaningless and meaningful action conditions (right graph). The time-interval and frequency range used for statistical analysis are marked in white. (B) Relative beta-power (16–24 Hz) for actions resulting in a meaningful end posture (blue lines) or a meaningless end posture (red lines).
Mentions: After meaningful and meaningless action conditions were matched for length of the actions, an additional time-frequency analysis was conducted on the posture interval, ranging from −200 to 4200 ms relative to posture onset4. As can be seen in Figure 7, the onset of the posture resulted in a comparable pattern as was observed for the entire object set, reflecting a gradual increase in beta power (16–24 Hz; post-movement beta rebound) that reached its maximum around 1500 ms after termination of the movement. Differences between meaningful and meaningless postures became apparent in a stronger beta-rebound for meaningless compared to meaningful postures. Statistical analysis of the difference showed a stronger beta-rebound for meaningless compared to meaningful actions from 750 to 1400 ms, from 1900 to 2600 ms, and from 3200 to 3450 ms after posture onset, F(1,11) > 5.1, p < 0.05. An interaction with Hemisphere, indicated that the effect was lateralized to the right hemisphere from 1250 to 1400 ms F(1,11) > 7.5, p < 0.05. Together these findings replicate the main finding and suggest that the stronger beta-rebound for meaningless actions cannot be attributed to differences in the duration of the movements.

Bottom Line: Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless compared to a meaningful end posture was accompanied by a stronger beta-desynchronization towards the end of the movement and a stronger subsequent beta-rebound after posture-onset.The effect in the beta-frequency band was localized to premotor, parietal and medial frontal areas and could not be attributed to differences in timing or movement complexity between meaningful and meaningless actions.This suggests that semantic object knowledge is indeed represented in motor-related brain areas, organized around specific end postures associated with the use of objects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Nijmegen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In the present EEG study we investigated whether semantic knowledge for object use is represented in motor-related brain areas. Subjects were required to perform actions with everyday objects and to maintain either a meaningful or a meaningless end posture with the object. Analysis of the EEG data focused on the beta-frequency band, as previous studies have indicated that the maintenance of a posture is reflected in stronger beta-oscillations. Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless compared to a meaningful end posture was accompanied by a stronger beta-desynchronization towards the end of the movement and a stronger subsequent beta-rebound after posture-onset. The effect in the beta-frequency band was localized to premotor, parietal and medial frontal areas and could not be attributed to differences in timing or movement complexity between meaningful and meaningless actions. Together these findings directly show that the motor system is differentially activated during the execution and maintenance of semantically correct or incorrect end postures. This suggests that semantic object knowledge is indeed represented in motor-related brain areas, organized around specific end postures associated with the use of objects.

No MeSH data available.