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Semantics in the motor system: motor-cortical Beta oscillations reflect semantic knowledge of end-postures for object use.

van Elk M, van Schie HT, van den Heuvel R, Bekkering H - Front Hum Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless compared to a meaningful end posture was accompanied by a stronger beta-desynchronization towards the end of the movement and a stronger subsequent beta-rebound after posture-onset.The effect in the beta-frequency band was localized to premotor, parietal and medial frontal areas and could not be attributed to differences in timing or movement complexity between meaningful and meaningless actions.This suggests that semantic object knowledge is indeed represented in motor-related brain areas, organized around specific end postures associated with the use of objects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Nijmegen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In the present EEG study we investigated whether semantic knowledge for object use is represented in motor-related brain areas. Subjects were required to perform actions with everyday objects and to maintain either a meaningful or a meaningless end posture with the object. Analysis of the EEG data focused on the beta-frequency band, as previous studies have indicated that the maintenance of a posture is reflected in stronger beta-oscillations. Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless compared to a meaningful end posture was accompanied by a stronger beta-desynchronization towards the end of the movement and a stronger subsequent beta-rebound after posture-onset. The effect in the beta-frequency band was localized to premotor, parietal and medial frontal areas and could not be attributed to differences in timing or movement complexity between meaningful and meaningless actions. Together these findings directly show that the motor system is differentially activated during the execution and maintenance of semantically correct or incorrect end postures. This suggests that semantic object knowledge is indeed represented in motor-related brain areas, organized around specific end postures associated with the use of objects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Picture stimuli used in the experiment. For each object, one picture indicated a grip that would result in a meaningful end posture (left column). By crossing the grips between objects, for each object a grip was specified that would result in a meaningless end posture when the object was brought to the typical goal location (right column).
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Figure 2: Picture stimuli used in the experiment. For each object, one picture indicated a grip that would result in a meaningful end posture (left column). By crossing the grips between objects, for each object a grip was specified that would result in a meaningless end posture when the object was brought to the typical goal location (right column).

Mentions: Fifteen different familiar objects were used as stimuli, which are represented in Figure 1. For each object two different pictures were made in which the handgrip applied to the object was manipulated (see Figure 2). Half of all pictures represented a grip that would result in a meaningful end posture when the object was moved towards the correct goal location (e.g. full grip applied to a drinking bottle allows one to drink). The other half of all pictures represented a grip that would result in a meaningless end posture when the object was moved towards the correct goal location (e.g. pressing grip applied to a drinking bottle does not allow one to drink). Grips resulting in meaningless end postures were obtained by applying the meaningful grip from one object to a different object so that it would result in a meaningless end posture (e.g. applying the ‘pressing grip’ for the hairdryer to the water bottle, does not allow one to drink when the bottle is moved towards the mouth; see Figure 2). In this way the kinematic complexity of grips was counterbalanced between meaningful and meaningless conditions.


Semantics in the motor system: motor-cortical Beta oscillations reflect semantic knowledge of end-postures for object use.

van Elk M, van Schie HT, van den Heuvel R, Bekkering H - Front Hum Neurosci (2010)

Picture stimuli used in the experiment. For each object, one picture indicated a grip that would result in a meaningful end posture (left column). By crossing the grips between objects, for each object a grip was specified that would result in a meaningless end posture when the object was brought to the typical goal location (right column).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2821178&req=5

Figure 2: Picture stimuli used in the experiment. For each object, one picture indicated a grip that would result in a meaningful end posture (left column). By crossing the grips between objects, for each object a grip was specified that would result in a meaningless end posture when the object was brought to the typical goal location (right column).
Mentions: Fifteen different familiar objects were used as stimuli, which are represented in Figure 1. For each object two different pictures were made in which the handgrip applied to the object was manipulated (see Figure 2). Half of all pictures represented a grip that would result in a meaningful end posture when the object was moved towards the correct goal location (e.g. full grip applied to a drinking bottle allows one to drink). The other half of all pictures represented a grip that would result in a meaningless end posture when the object was moved towards the correct goal location (e.g. pressing grip applied to a drinking bottle does not allow one to drink). Grips resulting in meaningless end postures were obtained by applying the meaningful grip from one object to a different object so that it would result in a meaningless end posture (e.g. applying the ‘pressing grip’ for the hairdryer to the water bottle, does not allow one to drink when the bottle is moved towards the mouth; see Figure 2). In this way the kinematic complexity of grips was counterbalanced between meaningful and meaningless conditions.

Bottom Line: Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless compared to a meaningful end posture was accompanied by a stronger beta-desynchronization towards the end of the movement and a stronger subsequent beta-rebound after posture-onset.The effect in the beta-frequency band was localized to premotor, parietal and medial frontal areas and could not be attributed to differences in timing or movement complexity between meaningful and meaningless actions.This suggests that semantic object knowledge is indeed represented in motor-related brain areas, organized around specific end postures associated with the use of objects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Nijmegen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In the present EEG study we investigated whether semantic knowledge for object use is represented in motor-related brain areas. Subjects were required to perform actions with everyday objects and to maintain either a meaningful or a meaningless end posture with the object. Analysis of the EEG data focused on the beta-frequency band, as previous studies have indicated that the maintenance of a posture is reflected in stronger beta-oscillations. Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless compared to a meaningful end posture was accompanied by a stronger beta-desynchronization towards the end of the movement and a stronger subsequent beta-rebound after posture-onset. The effect in the beta-frequency band was localized to premotor, parietal and medial frontal areas and could not be attributed to differences in timing or movement complexity between meaningful and meaningless actions. Together these findings directly show that the motor system is differentially activated during the execution and maintenance of semantically correct or incorrect end postures. This suggests that semantic object knowledge is indeed represented in motor-related brain areas, organized around specific end postures associated with the use of objects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus