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Elucidation of the effects of a high fat diet on trace elements in rabbit tissues using atomic absorption spectroscopy.

Abdelhalim MA, Alhadlaq HA, Moussa SA - Lipids Health Dis (2010)

Bottom Line: These results suggest that Fe plays a major role in atherogenesis; it may accelerate the process of atherosclerosis probably through the production of free radicals, deposition and absorption of intracellular and extracellular lipids in the intima, connective tissue formation, smooth muscle proliferation, lower matrix degradation capacity and increased plaque stability.Zn plays a major role in atherogenesis and that it may act as an endogenous protective factor against atherosclerosis perhaps by reducing lesion Fe content, intracellular and extracellular lipids in the intima, connective tissue formation, and smooth muscle proliferation.These results suggest that it may be possible to use the measurement of changes in trace elements in different tissues of rabbits as an important risk factor during the progression of atherosclerosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. abdelhalimmak@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: The mechanism of atherogenesis is not yet fully understood despite intense study in this area. The effects of high fat diet (HFD) on the changes of trace elements [iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)] in several tissues of rabbits have not been documented before. Thus, the aim of this study was to elucidate the changes in trace elements in several tissues of rabbits fed on HFD for a period of feeding of 10 weeks.

Results: The HFD group was fed a NOR rabbit chow supplemented with 1.0% cholesterol plus 1.0% olive oil. Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations were measured in four types of tissue from control and HFD rabbits using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Comparing HFD rabbits to control rabbits, we found that the highest percentage change of increase of Fe was 95% in lung tissue, while the lowest percentage change of increase of Fe was 7% in kidney tissue; the highest percentage change of decrease of Cu was 16% in aortic tissue, while the lowest percentage change of decrease of Cu was 6% in kidney tissue; and the highest percentage change of decrease of Zn was 71% in kidney tissue, while the lowest percentage change of decrease of Zn was 8% in lung tissue.

Conclusions: These results suggest that Fe plays a major role in atherogenesis; it may accelerate the process of atherosclerosis probably through the production of free radicals, deposition and absorption of intracellular and extracellular lipids in the intima, connective tissue formation, smooth muscle proliferation, lower matrix degradation capacity and increased plaque stability. Furthermore, inducing anemia in HFD rabbits may delay or inhibit the progression of atherosclerosis. Cu plays a minor role in atherogenesis and Cu supplements may inhibit the progression of atherogenesis, perhaps by reducing the migration of smooth muscle cells from the media to the intima. Zn plays a major role in atherogenesis and that it may act as an endogenous protective factor against atherosclerosis perhaps by reducing lesion Fe content, intracellular and extracellular lipids in the intima, connective tissue formation, and smooth muscle proliferation. These results suggest that it may be possible to use the measurement of changes in trace elements in different tissues of rabbits as an important risk factor during the progression of atherosclerosis.

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Fe concentrations in lung, kidney, heart and aortic tissues of control and HFD rabbits.
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Figure 1: Fe concentrations in lung, kidney, heart and aortic tissues of control and HFD rabbits.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the Fe concentrations in lung, kidney, heart and aortic tissues of control and HFD rabbits. The Fe concentration was significantly increased with percentage changes of 95% in lung, 7% in kidney, 25% in heart and 33% in aorta of HFD rabbits compared with control rabbits.


Elucidation of the effects of a high fat diet on trace elements in rabbit tissues using atomic absorption spectroscopy.

Abdelhalim MA, Alhadlaq HA, Moussa SA - Lipids Health Dis (2010)

Fe concentrations in lung, kidney, heart and aortic tissues of control and HFD rabbits.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2820023&req=5

Figure 1: Fe concentrations in lung, kidney, heart and aortic tissues of control and HFD rabbits.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the Fe concentrations in lung, kidney, heart and aortic tissues of control and HFD rabbits. The Fe concentration was significantly increased with percentage changes of 95% in lung, 7% in kidney, 25% in heart and 33% in aorta of HFD rabbits compared with control rabbits.

Bottom Line: These results suggest that Fe plays a major role in atherogenesis; it may accelerate the process of atherosclerosis probably through the production of free radicals, deposition and absorption of intracellular and extracellular lipids in the intima, connective tissue formation, smooth muscle proliferation, lower matrix degradation capacity and increased plaque stability.Zn plays a major role in atherogenesis and that it may act as an endogenous protective factor against atherosclerosis perhaps by reducing lesion Fe content, intracellular and extracellular lipids in the intima, connective tissue formation, and smooth muscle proliferation.These results suggest that it may be possible to use the measurement of changes in trace elements in different tissues of rabbits as an important risk factor during the progression of atherosclerosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. abdelhalimmak@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: The mechanism of atherogenesis is not yet fully understood despite intense study in this area. The effects of high fat diet (HFD) on the changes of trace elements [iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)] in several tissues of rabbits have not been documented before. Thus, the aim of this study was to elucidate the changes in trace elements in several tissues of rabbits fed on HFD for a period of feeding of 10 weeks.

Results: The HFD group was fed a NOR rabbit chow supplemented with 1.0% cholesterol plus 1.0% olive oil. Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations were measured in four types of tissue from control and HFD rabbits using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Comparing HFD rabbits to control rabbits, we found that the highest percentage change of increase of Fe was 95% in lung tissue, while the lowest percentage change of increase of Fe was 7% in kidney tissue; the highest percentage change of decrease of Cu was 16% in aortic tissue, while the lowest percentage change of decrease of Cu was 6% in kidney tissue; and the highest percentage change of decrease of Zn was 71% in kidney tissue, while the lowest percentage change of decrease of Zn was 8% in lung tissue.

Conclusions: These results suggest that Fe plays a major role in atherogenesis; it may accelerate the process of atherosclerosis probably through the production of free radicals, deposition and absorption of intracellular and extracellular lipids in the intima, connective tissue formation, smooth muscle proliferation, lower matrix degradation capacity and increased plaque stability. Furthermore, inducing anemia in HFD rabbits may delay or inhibit the progression of atherosclerosis. Cu plays a minor role in atherogenesis and Cu supplements may inhibit the progression of atherogenesis, perhaps by reducing the migration of smooth muscle cells from the media to the intima. Zn plays a major role in atherogenesis and that it may act as an endogenous protective factor against atherosclerosis perhaps by reducing lesion Fe content, intracellular and extracellular lipids in the intima, connective tissue formation, and smooth muscle proliferation. These results suggest that it may be possible to use the measurement of changes in trace elements in different tissues of rabbits as an important risk factor during the progression of atherosclerosis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus