Limits...
Never Has There Been a Shade 1

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Without exaggeration, his work is perfect, and his depiction is a masterpiece of the age. ” These were the words of Emperor Jahangir of the Mughal Dynasty of India. “Abu’l Hasan’s father,” Jahangir continued, “was Aqa Reza of Herat [in western Afghanistan], who joined my service while I was still a prince... The Mughal Dynasty, known for its contributions in the political unification of India, also marked a golden age for the arts; particularly during the reign of Jahangir, when art intended to document the life and culture of the court flourished and a distinctive style developed known as Mughal painting... During the 16th and 17th centuries, trade and the movement of humans, animals, and plants increased around the globe... Italian Renaissance reached the Mughal court, and the representational realism of the court, shaped by Hindu, Persian, and Chinese influences, found its way into European painting as Dutch and other artists visited India... Still, Mughal painters treaded their own path, resisting such preoccupations as perspective and the use of chiaroscuro to create the illusion of depth... Instead, they painted flat patterns, which they burnished for a jewel-like effect... Squirrels in a Plane Tree, on this month’s cover, the most famous painting associated with Abu’l Hasan, shows a naturalism that must have followed direct observation... And because the common red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in it are European natives not found in India, the artist must have observed them either in Jahangir’s zoo or abroad during one of the emperor’s travels... Near the base, a hunter begins to climb toward the furry creatures... Like the squirrels, he does not have native features but seems extracted from some European painting of the period... Abu’l Hasan’s bucolic tree teeming with small mammals and birds and surrounded by wildlife seems pertinent to a topic in this issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases: Kyasanur Forest disease and the namesake mammalian tick-borne virus, enzootic to limited geographic areas of India’s Karnataka State... Not to mention that, unbeknownst to him, along with other hunters of tree-dwelling creatures, he is at great risk for virus infection... Still, his predicament pales beside that of virus hunters, who know as in the case of Kyasanur Forest disease virus, that obscured by unrecognized disease or cryptic enzootic cycles, elusive viruses may exist in other geographic areas and ecologic niches.

No MeSH data available.


Abu'l Hasan, Nadir al-Zaman (1588–c.1635) Squirrels in a Plane Tree with Hunter Attempting to Climb the Tree (1605–08) Gouache on paper (22 cm × 36 cm) British Library, London, UK
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2819890&req=5

Fa: Abu'l Hasan, Nadir al-Zaman (1588–c.1635) Squirrels in a Plane Tree with Hunter Attempting to Climb the Tree (1605–08) Gouache on paper (22 cm × 36 cm) British Library, London, UK


Never Has There Been a Shade 1
Abu'l Hasan, Nadir al-Zaman (1588–c.1635) Squirrels in a Plane Tree with Hunter Attempting to Climb the Tree (1605–08) Gouache on paper (22 cm × 36 cm) British Library, London, UK
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2819890&req=5

Fa: Abu'l Hasan, Nadir al-Zaman (1588–c.1635) Squirrels in a Plane Tree with Hunter Attempting to Climb the Tree (1605–08) Gouache on paper (22 cm × 36 cm) British Library, London, UK

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Without exaggeration, his work is perfect, and his depiction is a masterpiece of the age. ” These were the words of Emperor Jahangir of the Mughal Dynasty of India. “Abu’l Hasan’s father,” Jahangir continued, “was Aqa Reza of Herat [in western Afghanistan], who joined my service while I was still a prince... The Mughal Dynasty, known for its contributions in the political unification of India, also marked a golden age for the arts; particularly during the reign of Jahangir, when art intended to document the life and culture of the court flourished and a distinctive style developed known as Mughal painting... During the 16th and 17th centuries, trade and the movement of humans, animals, and plants increased around the globe... Italian Renaissance reached the Mughal court, and the representational realism of the court, shaped by Hindu, Persian, and Chinese influences, found its way into European painting as Dutch and other artists visited India... Still, Mughal painters treaded their own path, resisting such preoccupations as perspective and the use of chiaroscuro to create the illusion of depth... Instead, they painted flat patterns, which they burnished for a jewel-like effect... Squirrels in a Plane Tree, on this month’s cover, the most famous painting associated with Abu’l Hasan, shows a naturalism that must have followed direct observation... And because the common red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in it are European natives not found in India, the artist must have observed them either in Jahangir’s zoo or abroad during one of the emperor’s travels... Near the base, a hunter begins to climb toward the furry creatures... Like the squirrels, he does not have native features but seems extracted from some European painting of the period... Abu’l Hasan’s bucolic tree teeming with small mammals and birds and surrounded by wildlife seems pertinent to a topic in this issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases: Kyasanur Forest disease and the namesake mammalian tick-borne virus, enzootic to limited geographic areas of India’s Karnataka State... Not to mention that, unbeknownst to him, along with other hunters of tree-dwelling creatures, he is at great risk for virus infection... Still, his predicament pales beside that of virus hunters, who know as in the case of Kyasanur Forest disease virus, that obscured by unrecognized disease or cryptic enzootic cycles, elusive viruses may exist in other geographic areas and ecologic niches.

No MeSH data available.