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Nurses' contacts and potential for infectious disease transmission.

Bernard H, Fischer R, Mikolajczyk RT, Kretzschmar M, Wildner M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: During an influenza pandemic, illness among nurses might result in staff shortage.Using a paper diary approach, we compared nurses' daily contacts (2-way conversation with >2 words or skin-to-skin contact) with those of matched controls from a representative population survey.Our data, used with simulation models, can help predict staff availability and provide information for pandemic preparedness planning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Robert Koch Institute, Department for Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Berlin, Germany. bernardh@rki.de

ABSTRACT
Nurses' contacts with potentially infectious persons probably place them at higher risk than the general population for infectious diseases. During an influenza pandemic, illness among nurses might result in staff shortage. We aimed to show the value of individual data from the healthcare sector for mathematical modeling of infectious disease transmission. Using a paper diary approach, we compared nurses' daily contacts (2-way conversation with >2 words or skin-to-skin contact) with those of matched controls from a representative population survey. Nurses (n = 129) reported a median of 40 contacts (85% work related), and controls (n = 129) reported 12 contacts (33% work related). For nurses, 51% of work-related contacts were with patients (74% involving skin-to-skin contact, and 63% lasted < or =15 minutes); 40% were with staff members (29% and 36%, respectively). Our data, used with simulation models, can help predict staff availability and provide information for pandemic preparedness planning.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Total numbers of contacts for surveyed nurses and their matched controls from the general population, Bavaria, Germany, April–July 2007.
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Figure 1: Total numbers of contacts for surveyed nurses and their matched controls from the general population, Bavaria, Germany, April–July 2007.

Mentions: Matched nurses reported more total contacts than did controls (5,071 vs. 2,741; median 40 vs. 12; p<0.0001) and more contacts at work (4,288 vs. 1,996; median 34 vs. 4; p<0.0001) (Figure). In other locations, numbers of contacts were similar (783 vs. 745; both medians 5, p = 0.73). In both samples, more contacts occurred during Monday–Friday than during the weekend. Regardless of day of data collection (Monday–Friday or weekend), nurses had more contacts than did controls (Monday–Friday: total contacts median 41.5 vs. 21, p<0.0001; work median 35.5 vs. 16, p<0.0001; other, both medians 5, p = 0.79; on weekends: total contacts median 32 vs. 6, p<0.0001; work median 27 vs. 0, p<0.0001; other median 5 vs. 4, p = 0.85).


Nurses' contacts and potential for infectious disease transmission.

Bernard H, Fischer R, Mikolajczyk RT, Kretzschmar M, Wildner M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Total numbers of contacts for surveyed nurses and their matched controls from the general population, Bavaria, Germany, April–July 2007.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2819878&req=5

Figure 1: Total numbers of contacts for surveyed nurses and their matched controls from the general population, Bavaria, Germany, April–July 2007.
Mentions: Matched nurses reported more total contacts than did controls (5,071 vs. 2,741; median 40 vs. 12; p<0.0001) and more contacts at work (4,288 vs. 1,996; median 34 vs. 4; p<0.0001) (Figure). In other locations, numbers of contacts were similar (783 vs. 745; both medians 5, p = 0.73). In both samples, more contacts occurred during Monday–Friday than during the weekend. Regardless of day of data collection (Monday–Friday or weekend), nurses had more contacts than did controls (Monday–Friday: total contacts median 41.5 vs. 21, p<0.0001; work median 35.5 vs. 16, p<0.0001; other, both medians 5, p = 0.79; on weekends: total contacts median 32 vs. 6, p<0.0001; work median 27 vs. 0, p<0.0001; other median 5 vs. 4, p = 0.85).

Bottom Line: During an influenza pandemic, illness among nurses might result in staff shortage.Using a paper diary approach, we compared nurses' daily contacts (2-way conversation with >2 words or skin-to-skin contact) with those of matched controls from a representative population survey.Our data, used with simulation models, can help predict staff availability and provide information for pandemic preparedness planning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Robert Koch Institute, Department for Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Berlin, Germany. bernardh@rki.de

ABSTRACT
Nurses' contacts with potentially infectious persons probably place them at higher risk than the general population for infectious diseases. During an influenza pandemic, illness among nurses might result in staff shortage. We aimed to show the value of individual data from the healthcare sector for mathematical modeling of infectious disease transmission. Using a paper diary approach, we compared nurses' daily contacts (2-way conversation with >2 words or skin-to-skin contact) with those of matched controls from a representative population survey. Nurses (n = 129) reported a median of 40 contacts (85% work related), and controls (n = 129) reported 12 contacts (33% work related). For nurses, 51% of work-related contacts were with patients (74% involving skin-to-skin contact, and 63% lasted < or =15 minutes); 40% were with staff members (29% and 36%, respectively). Our data, used with simulation models, can help predict staff availability and provide information for pandemic preparedness planning.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus