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Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A (H7N3) in domestic poultry, Saskatchewan, Canada, 2007.

Berhane Y, Hisanaga T, Kehler H, Neufeld J, Manning L, Argue C, Handel K, Hooper-McGrevy K, Jonas M, Robinson J, Webster RG, Pasick J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: Epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular phylogenetic methods were used to investigate an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza on a broiler breeding farm in Saskatchewan, Canada.Results, coupled with data from influenza A virus surveillance of migratory waterfowl in Canada, implicated wild birds as the most probable source of the low pathogenicity precursor virus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular phylogenetic methods were used to investigate an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza on a broiler breeding farm in Saskatchewan, Canada. Results, coupled with data from influenza A virus surveillance of migratory waterfowl in Canada, implicated wild birds as the most probable source of the low pathogenicity precursor virus.

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Phyogenetic analysis of avian influenza virus H7 (A) and N3 (B) genes. Trees were generated with MEGA software (8) by using the neighbor-joining method (9). Evolutionary distances were computed by using the method of Nei and Gojobori (10). Percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered together in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) is shown next to the branches. Scale bars indicate substitutions per site.
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Figure 2: Phyogenetic analysis of avian influenza virus H7 (A) and N3 (B) genes. Trees were generated with MEGA software (8) by using the neighbor-joining method (9). Evolutionary distances were computed by using the method of Nei and Gojobori (10). Percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered together in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) is shown next to the branches. Scale bars indicate substitutions per site.

Mentions: Phylogenetic analysis (Figure 2; Tables 1, 2) showed a close relationship of Saskatchewan/2007 H7N3 with recent North American H7 subtype viruses of free-flying waterfowl origin (11). Several of these viruses were isolated during an avian influenza surveillance program that had been coordinated since 2005 by the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre. Although the wild bird surveillance program in Canada did not detect H7 viruses in 2005 (12) or 2006, a conclusion based on characterization of viruses that were isolated from all real-time RT-PCR swab samples positive for virus matrix gene, several H7 virus isolates were obtained in 2007. Most of these viruses were isolated from birds sampled in the neighboring provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, and Manitoba. The HA gene of Saskatchewan/2007 clusters with these 2007 wild bird isolates but not with the HA gene of A/chicken/British Columbia/2004 (H7N3), which was responsible for the HPAI outbreak in British Columbia. This finding further supports the hypothesis that the Saskatchewan/2007 isolate was of wild bird origin.


Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A (H7N3) in domestic poultry, Saskatchewan, Canada, 2007.

Berhane Y, Hisanaga T, Kehler H, Neufeld J, Manning L, Argue C, Handel K, Hooper-McGrevy K, Jonas M, Robinson J, Webster RG, Pasick J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Phyogenetic analysis of avian influenza virus H7 (A) and N3 (B) genes. Trees were generated with MEGA software (8) by using the neighbor-joining method (9). Evolutionary distances were computed by using the method of Nei and Gojobori (10). Percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered together in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) is shown next to the branches. Scale bars indicate substitutions per site.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2819867&req=5

Figure 2: Phyogenetic analysis of avian influenza virus H7 (A) and N3 (B) genes. Trees were generated with MEGA software (8) by using the neighbor-joining method (9). Evolutionary distances were computed by using the method of Nei and Gojobori (10). Percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered together in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) is shown next to the branches. Scale bars indicate substitutions per site.
Mentions: Phylogenetic analysis (Figure 2; Tables 1, 2) showed a close relationship of Saskatchewan/2007 H7N3 with recent North American H7 subtype viruses of free-flying waterfowl origin (11). Several of these viruses were isolated during an avian influenza surveillance program that had been coordinated since 2005 by the Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre. Although the wild bird surveillance program in Canada did not detect H7 viruses in 2005 (12) or 2006, a conclusion based on characterization of viruses that were isolated from all real-time RT-PCR swab samples positive for virus matrix gene, several H7 virus isolates were obtained in 2007. Most of these viruses were isolated from birds sampled in the neighboring provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, and Manitoba. The HA gene of Saskatchewan/2007 clusters with these 2007 wild bird isolates but not with the HA gene of A/chicken/British Columbia/2004 (H7N3), which was responsible for the HPAI outbreak in British Columbia. This finding further supports the hypothesis that the Saskatchewan/2007 isolate was of wild bird origin.

Bottom Line: Epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular phylogenetic methods were used to investigate an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza on a broiler breeding farm in Saskatchewan, Canada.Results, coupled with data from influenza A virus surveillance of migratory waterfowl in Canada, implicated wild birds as the most probable source of the low pathogenicity precursor virus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular phylogenetic methods were used to investigate an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza on a broiler breeding farm in Saskatchewan, Canada. Results, coupled with data from influenza A virus surveillance of migratory waterfowl in Canada, implicated wild birds as the most probable source of the low pathogenicity precursor virus.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus