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Kinetics of kill of bacterial conjunctivitis isolates with moxifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, compared with the aminoglycosides tobramycin and gentamicin.

Wagner RS, Granet DB, Lichtenstein SJ, Jamison T, Dajcs JJ, Gross RD, Cockrum P - Clin Ophthalmol (2010)

Bottom Line: Tobramycin and gentamicin did not achieve 3-log reduction of S. pneumoniae during the 180-minute study period.Gentamicin took more than 120 minutes to achieve the 3-log reduction of H. influenzae and tobramycin did not reach the 3-log reduction of this pathogen during the 180-minute study period.Moxifloxacin killed S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in vitro faster than tobramycin and gentamicin, suggesting its potential clinical benefit as a first-line treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis to minimize patient symptoms and to limit the contagiousness of the disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New Jersey Medical School, 185 So. orange Avenue, Medical Science Building Newark, NJ, USA. wagdoc@comcast.net

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To compare the kinetics and speed of kill of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae on exposure to three topical ophthalmic antibiotic solutions.

Materials and methods: Bacterial conjunctivitis isolates of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were exposed to 1:1000 dilutions of moxifloxacin 0.5%, tobramycin 0.3%, gentamicin 0.3%, and water (control). At 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after exposure, aliquots were collected, cells were cultured, and viable cell counts were determined using standard microbiological methods.

Results: Moxifloxacin achieved 99.9% kill (3-log reduction) at approximately 2 hours for S. pneumoniae and at 15 minutes for H. influenzae. Tobramycin and gentamicin did not achieve 3-log reduction of S. pneumoniae during the 180-minute study period. An increase in bacterial growth was noted for these isolates. Gentamicin took more than 120 minutes to achieve the 3-log reduction of H. influenzae and tobramycin did not reach the 3-log reduction of this pathogen during the 180-minute study period.

Conclusion: Moxifloxacin killed S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in vitro faster than tobramycin and gentamicin, suggesting its potential clinical benefit as a first-line treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis to minimize patient symptoms and to limit the contagiousness of the disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percent survivors of Streptococcus pneumoniae (MCC 40211) as a function of time.
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f1-opth-4-041: Percent survivors of Streptococcus pneumoniae (MCC 40211) as a function of time.

Mentions: Kinetics of kill studies of moxifloxacin, tobramycin, and gentamicin were conducted with S. pneumoniae (MCC 40211) and H. influenzae (MCC 95018). The MIC susceptibility profiles of these isolates to selected antibiotics are presented in Table 1, which is similar to profiles previously reported in the literature.4,6,15 The kinetics of kill data for the two isolates are presented in Figures 1 and 3 as percent survivors from initial CFU/mL.


Kinetics of kill of bacterial conjunctivitis isolates with moxifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, compared with the aminoglycosides tobramycin and gentamicin.

Wagner RS, Granet DB, Lichtenstein SJ, Jamison T, Dajcs JJ, Gross RD, Cockrum P - Clin Ophthalmol (2010)

Percent survivors of Streptococcus pneumoniae (MCC 40211) as a function of time.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2819768&req=5

f1-opth-4-041: Percent survivors of Streptococcus pneumoniae (MCC 40211) as a function of time.
Mentions: Kinetics of kill studies of moxifloxacin, tobramycin, and gentamicin were conducted with S. pneumoniae (MCC 40211) and H. influenzae (MCC 95018). The MIC susceptibility profiles of these isolates to selected antibiotics are presented in Table 1, which is similar to profiles previously reported in the literature.4,6,15 The kinetics of kill data for the two isolates are presented in Figures 1 and 3 as percent survivors from initial CFU/mL.

Bottom Line: Tobramycin and gentamicin did not achieve 3-log reduction of S. pneumoniae during the 180-minute study period.Gentamicin took more than 120 minutes to achieve the 3-log reduction of H. influenzae and tobramycin did not reach the 3-log reduction of this pathogen during the 180-minute study period.Moxifloxacin killed S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in vitro faster than tobramycin and gentamicin, suggesting its potential clinical benefit as a first-line treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis to minimize patient symptoms and to limit the contagiousness of the disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New Jersey Medical School, 185 So. orange Avenue, Medical Science Building Newark, NJ, USA. wagdoc@comcast.net

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To compare the kinetics and speed of kill of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae on exposure to three topical ophthalmic antibiotic solutions.

Materials and methods: Bacterial conjunctivitis isolates of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were exposed to 1:1000 dilutions of moxifloxacin 0.5%, tobramycin 0.3%, gentamicin 0.3%, and water (control). At 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after exposure, aliquots were collected, cells were cultured, and viable cell counts were determined using standard microbiological methods.

Results: Moxifloxacin achieved 99.9% kill (3-log reduction) at approximately 2 hours for S. pneumoniae and at 15 minutes for H. influenzae. Tobramycin and gentamicin did not achieve 3-log reduction of S. pneumoniae during the 180-minute study period. An increase in bacterial growth was noted for these isolates. Gentamicin took more than 120 minutes to achieve the 3-log reduction of H. influenzae and tobramycin did not reach the 3-log reduction of this pathogen during the 180-minute study period.

Conclusion: Moxifloxacin killed S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in vitro faster than tobramycin and gentamicin, suggesting its potential clinical benefit as a first-line treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis to minimize patient symptoms and to limit the contagiousness of the disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus