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Evaluation of ultraviolet light toxicity on cultured retinal pigment epithelial and retinal ganglion cells.

Balaiya S, Murthy RK, Brar VS, Chalam KV - Clin Ophthalmol (2010)

Bottom Line: They were subsequently examined for changes in cell morphology, cell viability (neutral red uptake assay), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), expression of bax, bcl-2 and cytochome C by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively.Dose-dependent reduction in cell viability to UVB light was demonstrated with parallel increase in ROS.The concomitant generation of ROS and expression of apoptotic markers suggests the role of oxidative stress in UVB-mediated apoptosis in an in vitro model of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Our study is aimed at evaluating the role of UVB light in inducing cytotoxicity in an in vitro model.

Methods: RGC-5 and ARPE-19 cells were exposed to different time periods of UVB light: 0, 15, 30, and 45 min. They were subsequently examined for changes in cell morphology, cell viability (neutral red uptake assay), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), expression of bax, bcl-2 and cytochome C by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively.

Results: Dose-dependent reduction in cell viability to UVB light was demonstrated with parallel increase in ROS. Increased duration of exposure (>15 minutes), was associated with increased expression of bax and cytochrome C, and absence of bcl-2 expression.

Conclusion: UVB light exposure results in cell cytotoxicity. The concomitant generation of ROS and expression of apoptotic markers suggests the role of oxidative stress in UVB-mediated apoptosis in an in vitro model of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Viability of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells after 15, 30, and 45 min exposure to UVB light.Notes: *P < 0.00005, **P < 0.0005.
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f3-opth-4-033: Viability of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells after 15, 30, and 45 min exposure to UVB light.Notes: *P < 0.00005, **P < 0.0005.

Mentions: We observed that there was a significant reduction in lysosomal membrane integrity in RGC-5 cells at 15 to 45 min of exposure to UVB (P < 0.00005). In comparison with control, only 45% of cells were viable after 15 min of exposure to UVB, which further decreased to 13% after 45 min of exposure. Similarly, in ARPE-19 cells, in comparison to control, 56% of cells were viable after 15 min of UV exposure which decreased to 13% after 45 min exposure (P < 0.0005) (Figure 3).


Evaluation of ultraviolet light toxicity on cultured retinal pigment epithelial and retinal ganglion cells.

Balaiya S, Murthy RK, Brar VS, Chalam KV - Clin Ophthalmol (2010)

Viability of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells after 15, 30, and 45 min exposure to UVB light.Notes: *P < 0.00005, **P < 0.0005.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2819767&req=5

f3-opth-4-033: Viability of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells after 15, 30, and 45 min exposure to UVB light.Notes: *P < 0.00005, **P < 0.0005.
Mentions: We observed that there was a significant reduction in lysosomal membrane integrity in RGC-5 cells at 15 to 45 min of exposure to UVB (P < 0.00005). In comparison with control, only 45% of cells were viable after 15 min of exposure to UVB, which further decreased to 13% after 45 min of exposure. Similarly, in ARPE-19 cells, in comparison to control, 56% of cells were viable after 15 min of UV exposure which decreased to 13% after 45 min exposure (P < 0.0005) (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: They were subsequently examined for changes in cell morphology, cell viability (neutral red uptake assay), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), expression of bax, bcl-2 and cytochome C by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively.Dose-dependent reduction in cell viability to UVB light was demonstrated with parallel increase in ROS.The concomitant generation of ROS and expression of apoptotic markers suggests the role of oxidative stress in UVB-mediated apoptosis in an in vitro model of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Our study is aimed at evaluating the role of UVB light in inducing cytotoxicity in an in vitro model.

Methods: RGC-5 and ARPE-19 cells were exposed to different time periods of UVB light: 0, 15, 30, and 45 min. They were subsequently examined for changes in cell morphology, cell viability (neutral red uptake assay), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), expression of bax, bcl-2 and cytochome C by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively.

Results: Dose-dependent reduction in cell viability to UVB light was demonstrated with parallel increase in ROS. Increased duration of exposure (>15 minutes), was associated with increased expression of bax and cytochrome C, and absence of bcl-2 expression.

Conclusion: UVB light exposure results in cell cytotoxicity. The concomitant generation of ROS and expression of apoptotic markers suggests the role of oxidative stress in UVB-mediated apoptosis in an in vitro model of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus