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Dichlorvos exposure impedes extraction and amplification of DNA from insects in museum collections.

Espeland M, Irestedt M, Johanson KA, Akerlund M, Bergh JE, Källersjö M - Front. Zool. (2010)

Bottom Line: We thus tested the effect of dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene on DNA of insects (Musca domestica) by extracting and amplifying DNA from specimens exposed to insecticides in two different concentrations over increasing time intervals.The results clearly show that dichlorvos impedes both extraction and amplification of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA after relatively short time, whereas paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene do not.Collections treated with paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene, are better preserved concerning DNA, than those treated with dichlorvos.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Swedish Museum of Natural History, Entomology Department, Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: The insecticides dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene have been commonly used to eradicate pest insects from natural history collections. However, it is not known how these chemicals affect the DNA of the specimens in the collections. We thus tested the effect of dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene on DNA of insects (Musca domestica) by extracting and amplifying DNA from specimens exposed to insecticides in two different concentrations over increasing time intervals.

Results: The results clearly show that dichlorvos impedes both extraction and amplification of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA after relatively short time, whereas paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene do not.

Conclusion: Collections treated with paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene, are better preserved concerning DNA, than those treated with dichlorvos. Non toxic pest control methods should, however, be preferred due to physical damage of specimens and putative health risks by chemicals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Total DNA extracts of specimens exposed to high concentration (0.02 g/vial) A) paradichlorobenzene and B) naphthalene, and C) controls not exposed to insecticides. L indicates ladder. See Table 2 for sample intervals.
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Figure 3: Total DNA extracts of specimens exposed to high concentration (0.02 g/vial) A) paradichlorobenzene and B) naphthalene, and C) controls not exposed to insecticides. L indicates ladder. See Table 2 for sample intervals.

Mentions: Visualization of DNA extracts on agarose gels showed that dichlorvos fragments DNA both in high and low concentration (Figure 2A-B). After four and twelve months of exposure of the high and recommended dosage dichlorvos respectively, the band of DNA of length around 23 000 bp, which constitutes of most of the DNA in the control, has completely disappeared from the dichlorvos samples. Only a very low amount of highly degraded DNA (<500 bp) is present in these samples. No effect on DNA was seen in samples treated with naphthalene and paradichlorobenzene (Figure 3A, B, only high concentration, 0.02 g/vial, shown; control: Figure 3C).


Dichlorvos exposure impedes extraction and amplification of DNA from insects in museum collections.

Espeland M, Irestedt M, Johanson KA, Akerlund M, Bergh JE, Källersjö M - Front. Zool. (2010)

Total DNA extracts of specimens exposed to high concentration (0.02 g/vial) A) paradichlorobenzene and B) naphthalene, and C) controls not exposed to insecticides. L indicates ladder. See Table 2 for sample intervals.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2819063&req=5

Figure 3: Total DNA extracts of specimens exposed to high concentration (0.02 g/vial) A) paradichlorobenzene and B) naphthalene, and C) controls not exposed to insecticides. L indicates ladder. See Table 2 for sample intervals.
Mentions: Visualization of DNA extracts on agarose gels showed that dichlorvos fragments DNA both in high and low concentration (Figure 2A-B). After four and twelve months of exposure of the high and recommended dosage dichlorvos respectively, the band of DNA of length around 23 000 bp, which constitutes of most of the DNA in the control, has completely disappeared from the dichlorvos samples. Only a very low amount of highly degraded DNA (<500 bp) is present in these samples. No effect on DNA was seen in samples treated with naphthalene and paradichlorobenzene (Figure 3A, B, only high concentration, 0.02 g/vial, shown; control: Figure 3C).

Bottom Line: We thus tested the effect of dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene on DNA of insects (Musca domestica) by extracting and amplifying DNA from specimens exposed to insecticides in two different concentrations over increasing time intervals.The results clearly show that dichlorvos impedes both extraction and amplification of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA after relatively short time, whereas paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene do not.Collections treated with paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene, are better preserved concerning DNA, than those treated with dichlorvos.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Swedish Museum of Natural History, Entomology Department, Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: The insecticides dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene have been commonly used to eradicate pest insects from natural history collections. However, it is not known how these chemicals affect the DNA of the specimens in the collections. We thus tested the effect of dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene on DNA of insects (Musca domestica) by extracting and amplifying DNA from specimens exposed to insecticides in two different concentrations over increasing time intervals.

Results: The results clearly show that dichlorvos impedes both extraction and amplification of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA after relatively short time, whereas paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene do not.

Conclusion: Collections treated with paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene, are better preserved concerning DNA, than those treated with dichlorvos. Non toxic pest control methods should, however, be preferred due to physical damage of specimens and putative health risks by chemicals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus