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2-year survival of patients undergoing mild hypothermia treatment after ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest is significantly improved compared to historical controls.

Storm C, Nee J, Krueger A, Schefold JC, Hasper D - Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med (2010)

Bottom Line: Neurological outcome was assessed at ICU discharge according to the Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC).A Kaplan-Meier analysis of follow-up data concerning mortality after 24 months as well as a Cox-regression to adjust for confounders were calculated.Our study demonstrates that the early survival benefit seen with therapeutic hypothermia persists after two years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Nephrology and Medical Intensive Care, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany. christian.storm@charite.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Therapeutic hypothermia has been proven to be effective in improving neurological outcome in patients after cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation (VF). Data concerning the effect of hypothermia treatment on long-term survival however is limited.

Materials and methods: Clinical and outcome data of 107 consecutive patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to VF were compared with 98 historical controls. Neurological outcome was assessed at ICU discharge according to the Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC). A Kaplan-Meier analysis of follow-up data concerning mortality after 24 months as well as a Cox-regression to adjust for confounders were calculated.

Results: Neurological outcome significantly improved after mild hypothermia treatment (hypothermia group CPC 1-2 59.8%, control group CPC 1-2 24.5%; p < 0.01). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis hypothermia treatment was also associated with significantly improved 2-year probability for survival (hypothermia 55% vs. control 34%; p = 0.029). Cox-regression analysis revealed hypothermia treatment (p = 0.031) and age (p = 0.013) as independent predictors of 24-month survival.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that the early survival benefit seen with therapeutic hypothermia persists after two years. This strongly supports adherence to current recommendations regarding postresuscitation care for all patients after cardiac arrest due to VF and maybe other rhythms as well.

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Kaplan-Meier-survival analysis of both study groups. A 2 year follow up was available for n = 101 in the hypothermia group and n = 87 in the control group. The difference between the two groups was significant (Logrank test p = 0.029).
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Figure 1: Kaplan-Meier-survival analysis of both study groups. A 2 year follow up was available for n = 101 in the hypothermia group and n = 87 in the control group. The difference between the two groups was significant (Logrank test p = 0.029).

Mentions: The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significantly higher 2-year probability of survival in the hypothermia group (hypothermia 55% vs. control 34%; p = 0.029; Figure 1).


2-year survival of patients undergoing mild hypothermia treatment after ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest is significantly improved compared to historical controls.

Storm C, Nee J, Krueger A, Schefold JC, Hasper D - Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med (2010)

Kaplan-Meier-survival analysis of both study groups. A 2 year follow up was available for n = 101 in the hypothermia group and n = 87 in the control group. The difference between the two groups was significant (Logrank test p = 0.029).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2818632&req=5

Figure 1: Kaplan-Meier-survival analysis of both study groups. A 2 year follow up was available for n = 101 in the hypothermia group and n = 87 in the control group. The difference between the two groups was significant (Logrank test p = 0.029).
Mentions: The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significantly higher 2-year probability of survival in the hypothermia group (hypothermia 55% vs. control 34%; p = 0.029; Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Neurological outcome was assessed at ICU discharge according to the Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC).A Kaplan-Meier analysis of follow-up data concerning mortality after 24 months as well as a Cox-regression to adjust for confounders were calculated.Our study demonstrates that the early survival benefit seen with therapeutic hypothermia persists after two years.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Nephrology and Medical Intensive Care, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany. christian.storm@charite.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Therapeutic hypothermia has been proven to be effective in improving neurological outcome in patients after cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation (VF). Data concerning the effect of hypothermia treatment on long-term survival however is limited.

Materials and methods: Clinical and outcome data of 107 consecutive patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to VF were compared with 98 historical controls. Neurological outcome was assessed at ICU discharge according to the Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC). A Kaplan-Meier analysis of follow-up data concerning mortality after 24 months as well as a Cox-regression to adjust for confounders were calculated.

Results: Neurological outcome significantly improved after mild hypothermia treatment (hypothermia group CPC 1-2 59.8%, control group CPC 1-2 24.5%; p < 0.01). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis hypothermia treatment was also associated with significantly improved 2-year probability for survival (hypothermia 55% vs. control 34%; p = 0.029). Cox-regression analysis revealed hypothermia treatment (p = 0.031) and age (p = 0.013) as independent predictors of 24-month survival.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that the early survival benefit seen with therapeutic hypothermia persists after two years. This strongly supports adherence to current recommendations regarding postresuscitation care for all patients after cardiac arrest due to VF and maybe other rhythms as well.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus