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Canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy: current situation and perspectives.

Otranto D, Dantas-Torres F - Parasit Vectors (2010)

Bottom Line: Recent studies have highlighted the potential of fleas as vectors of pathogens of zoonotic relevance (e.g., Rickettsia felis) in this country.While some arthropod vectors (e.g., ticks and fleas) are present in certain Italian regions throughout the year, others (e.g., phlebotomine sand flies) are most active during the summer season.Accordingly, control strategies, such as those relying on the systematic use of acaricides and insecticides, should be planned on the basis of the ecology of both vectors and pathogens in different geographical areas in order to improve their effectiveness in reducing the risk of infection by vector-borne pathogens.

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Affiliation: Dipartimento di Sanità Pubblica e Zootecnia, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari, Italy.

ABSTRACT
In Italy, dogs and cats are at risk of becoming infected by different vector-borne pathogens, including protozoa, bacteria, and helminths. Ticks, fleas, phlebotomine sand flies, and mosquitoes are recognized vectors of pathogens affecting cats and dogs, some of which (e.g., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Dipylidium caninum, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens) are of zoonotic concern. Recent studies have highlighted the potential of fleas as vectors of pathogens of zoonotic relevance (e.g., Rickettsia felis) in this country. While some arthropod vectors (e.g., ticks and fleas) are present in certain Italian regions throughout the year, others (e.g., phlebotomine sand flies) are most active during the summer season. Accordingly, control strategies, such as those relying on the systematic use of acaricides and insecticides, should be planned on the basis of the ecology of both vectors and pathogens in different geographical areas in order to improve their effectiveness in reducing the risk of infection by vector-borne pathogens. This article reviews the current situation and perspectives of canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of major vector-borne bacteria infecting dogs in Italy. A, Anaplasma phagocytophilum. B, Anaplasma platys. C, Borrelia burgdorferi. D, Coxiella burnetii. E, Ehrlichia canis. F, Rickettsia conorii.
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Figure 3: Distribution of major vector-borne bacteria infecting dogs in Italy. A, Anaplasma phagocytophilum. B, Anaplasma platys. C, Borrelia burgdorferi. D, Coxiella burnetii. E, Ehrlichia canis. F, Rickettsia conorii.

Mentions: The geographical distribution of the main vector-borne pathogens affecting cats and dogs in Italy is reported in Figures 2 and 3. The maps have been elaborated based on data available in the literature, information provided by the Istituto Zooprofilattico della Sicilia (the reference centre for VBDs in Italy), and authors' unpublished data. Once again, the absence of certain pathogens in some regions (e.g., Babesia vogeli in Basilicata and Calabria regions) might be due the lack of studies carried out in these regions.


Canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy: current situation and perspectives.

Otranto D, Dantas-Torres F - Parasit Vectors (2010)

Distribution of major vector-borne bacteria infecting dogs in Italy. A, Anaplasma phagocytophilum. B, Anaplasma platys. C, Borrelia burgdorferi. D, Coxiella burnetii. E, Ehrlichia canis. F, Rickettsia conorii.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2818618&req=5

Figure 3: Distribution of major vector-borne bacteria infecting dogs in Italy. A, Anaplasma phagocytophilum. B, Anaplasma platys. C, Borrelia burgdorferi. D, Coxiella burnetii. E, Ehrlichia canis. F, Rickettsia conorii.
Mentions: The geographical distribution of the main vector-borne pathogens affecting cats and dogs in Italy is reported in Figures 2 and 3. The maps have been elaborated based on data available in the literature, information provided by the Istituto Zooprofilattico della Sicilia (the reference centre for VBDs in Italy), and authors' unpublished data. Once again, the absence of certain pathogens in some regions (e.g., Babesia vogeli in Basilicata and Calabria regions) might be due the lack of studies carried out in these regions.

Bottom Line: Recent studies have highlighted the potential of fleas as vectors of pathogens of zoonotic relevance (e.g., Rickettsia felis) in this country.While some arthropod vectors (e.g., ticks and fleas) are present in certain Italian regions throughout the year, others (e.g., phlebotomine sand flies) are most active during the summer season.Accordingly, control strategies, such as those relying on the systematic use of acaricides and insecticides, should be planned on the basis of the ecology of both vectors and pathogens in different geographical areas in order to improve their effectiveness in reducing the risk of infection by vector-borne pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Sanità Pubblica e Zootecnia, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Bari, 70010 Valenzano, Bari, Italy.

ABSTRACT
In Italy, dogs and cats are at risk of becoming infected by different vector-borne pathogens, including protozoa, bacteria, and helminths. Ticks, fleas, phlebotomine sand flies, and mosquitoes are recognized vectors of pathogens affecting cats and dogs, some of which (e.g., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Dipylidium caninum, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens) are of zoonotic concern. Recent studies have highlighted the potential of fleas as vectors of pathogens of zoonotic relevance (e.g., Rickettsia felis) in this country. While some arthropod vectors (e.g., ticks and fleas) are present in certain Italian regions throughout the year, others (e.g., phlebotomine sand flies) are most active during the summer season. Accordingly, control strategies, such as those relying on the systematic use of acaricides and insecticides, should be planned on the basis of the ecology of both vectors and pathogens in different geographical areas in order to improve their effectiveness in reducing the risk of infection by vector-borne pathogens. This article reviews the current situation and perspectives of canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus