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West Nile virus from blood donors, vertebrates, and mosquitoes, Puerto Rico, 2007.

Hunsperger EA, McElroy KL, Bessoff K, Colón C, Barrera R, Muñoz-Jordán JL - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: West Nile virus (WNV) was isolated from a human blood donor, a dead falcon, and mosquitoes in Puerto Rico in 2007.Phylogenetic analysis of the 4 isolates suggests a recent introduction of lineage I WNV that is closely related to WNV currently circulating in North America.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00920, USA. enh4@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
West Nile virus (WNV) was isolated from a human blood donor, a dead falcon, and mosquitoes in Puerto Rico in 2007. Phylogenetic analysis of the 4 isolates suggests a recent introduction of lineage I WNV that is closely related to WNV currently circulating in North America.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary of surveillance data indicating zoonotic and human transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Puerto Rico in 2007. Percentage of anti-WNV immunoglobulin (Ig) M–positive chickens per week from June 4 through December 20. Chickens were bled weekly during the beginning of transmission and monthly starting in September 2007. Sixty chickens were placed in the sentinel surveillance sites as previously described by Barrera et al. (7).
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Figure 1: Summary of surveillance data indicating zoonotic and human transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Puerto Rico in 2007. Percentage of anti-WNV immunoglobulin (Ig) M–positive chickens per week from June 4 through December 20. Chickens were bled weekly during the beginning of transmission and monthly starting in September 2007. Sixty chickens were placed in the sentinel surveillance sites as previously described by Barrera et al. (7).

Mentions: To test this hypothesis, we selected a study site in Ceiba and Naguabo municipalities, where the first birds positive for WNV were detected (6,7). Sixty sentinel chickens were placed in groups of 5 in 12 locations in accordance with Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee policies as previously described (7). The first seroconversion occurred in June 2007, one year after the initiation of the surveillance. Up to 43% of the chickens seroconverted in June and July 2007, as detected by immunoglobulin M ELISA (8); the percentage declined during September through December (Figure 1). During the period of transmission, miniature light/CO2 traps and gravid traps from CDC were placed near the chicken cages to capture mosquitoes. Samples from pools of Culex nigripalpus, Cx. bahamensis, and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were positive for WNV RNA, as detected by real-time reverse transcription–PCR (RT-PCR) (7). Sixteen WNV isolates were obtained by inoculating either C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) or Vero (African green monkey kidney) cell cultures with mosquito pool extract.


West Nile virus from blood donors, vertebrates, and mosquitoes, Puerto Rico, 2007.

Hunsperger EA, McElroy KL, Bessoff K, Colón C, Barrera R, Muñoz-Jordán JL - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Summary of surveillance data indicating zoonotic and human transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Puerto Rico in 2007. Percentage of anti-WNV immunoglobulin (Ig) M–positive chickens per week from June 4 through December 20. Chickens were bled weekly during the beginning of transmission and monthly starting in September 2007. Sixty chickens were placed in the sentinel surveillance sites as previously described by Barrera et al. (7).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2815984&req=5

Figure 1: Summary of surveillance data indicating zoonotic and human transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) in Puerto Rico in 2007. Percentage of anti-WNV immunoglobulin (Ig) M–positive chickens per week from June 4 through December 20. Chickens were bled weekly during the beginning of transmission and monthly starting in September 2007. Sixty chickens were placed in the sentinel surveillance sites as previously described by Barrera et al. (7).
Mentions: To test this hypothesis, we selected a study site in Ceiba and Naguabo municipalities, where the first birds positive for WNV were detected (6,7). Sixty sentinel chickens were placed in groups of 5 in 12 locations in accordance with Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee policies as previously described (7). The first seroconversion occurred in June 2007, one year after the initiation of the surveillance. Up to 43% of the chickens seroconverted in June and July 2007, as detected by immunoglobulin M ELISA (8); the percentage declined during September through December (Figure 1). During the period of transmission, miniature light/CO2 traps and gravid traps from CDC were placed near the chicken cages to capture mosquitoes. Samples from pools of Culex nigripalpus, Cx. bahamensis, and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were positive for WNV RNA, as detected by real-time reverse transcription–PCR (RT-PCR) (7). Sixteen WNV isolates were obtained by inoculating either C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) or Vero (African green monkey kidney) cell cultures with mosquito pool extract.

Bottom Line: West Nile virus (WNV) was isolated from a human blood donor, a dead falcon, and mosquitoes in Puerto Rico in 2007.Phylogenetic analysis of the 4 isolates suggests a recent introduction of lineage I WNV that is closely related to WNV currently circulating in North America.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00920, USA. enh4@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
West Nile virus (WNV) was isolated from a human blood donor, a dead falcon, and mosquitoes in Puerto Rico in 2007. Phylogenetic analysis of the 4 isolates suggests a recent introduction of lineage I WNV that is closely related to WNV currently circulating in North America.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus