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Epidemiologic study of Vibrio vulnificus infections by using variable number tandem repeats.

Broza YY, Danin-Poleg Y, Lerner L, Valinsky L, Broza M, Kashi Y - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Bottom Line: A 3-year environmental and clinical Vibrio vulnificus survey using simple-sequence repeats typing shows that V. vulnificus biotype 3 constitutes approximately 21% of the bacterium population in tested aquaculture ponds as opposed to approximately 86% of clinical cases.Simple-sequence repeats proved to be a useful epidemiologic tool, providing information on the environmental source of the pathogen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

ABSTRACT
A 3-year environmental and clinical Vibrio vulnificus survey using simple-sequence repeats typing shows that V. vulnificus biotype 3 constitutes approximately 21% of the bacterium population in tested aquaculture ponds as opposed to approximately 86% of clinical cases. Simple-sequence repeats proved to be a useful epidemiologic tool, providing information on the environmental source of the pathogen.

Show MeSH
Genetic relationships showing the epidemiologic connection among 12 clinical and environmental Vibrio vulnificus biotype 3 isolates based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis compared to analysis at 12 single-sequence repeat (SSR) loci. PFGE profiles were compared by using the Dice coefficient followed by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering (tolerance, 1.0%). Scale bars represent pattern similarity (% for PFGE and genetic distance for SSR).
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Figure 2: Genetic relationships showing the epidemiologic connection among 12 clinical and environmental Vibrio vulnificus biotype 3 isolates based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis compared to analysis at 12 single-sequence repeat (SSR) loci. PFGE profiles were compared by using the Dice coefficient followed by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering (tolerance, 1.0%). Scale bars represent pattern similarity (% for PFGE and genetic distance for SSR).

Mentions: To strengthen our typing results, we compared the epidemiologic SSR results to those of PFGE in 12 representative BT3 isolates. PFGE was performed and analyzed as described previously (8). Results for PFGE were generally similar to results for SSR (Figure 2). PFGE patterns were similar (>85%) between isolates. Identical PFGE patterns and SSR genotypes were seen in isolates v239 (clinical) and VVyb95, VVyb194 (environmental), as were isolates v232 (fish) and v254 (clinical). Identical PFGE patterns and single-locus variants in SSR genotypes were seen in clinical isolate v237 and the environmental isolates VVyb89 and VVyb1. Notably, VVyb1, which was isolated a year earlier, differentiated from VVyb89 by another single repeat in an additional single locus, confirming higher resolution of SSR method. Finally, identical SSR genotypes and PFGE patterns that differed by 1 band were seen in v240 and VVyb132.


Epidemiologic study of Vibrio vulnificus infections by using variable number tandem repeats.

Broza YY, Danin-Poleg Y, Lerner L, Valinsky L, Broza M, Kashi Y - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2009)

Genetic relationships showing the epidemiologic connection among 12 clinical and environmental Vibrio vulnificus biotype 3 isolates based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis compared to analysis at 12 single-sequence repeat (SSR) loci. PFGE profiles were compared by using the Dice coefficient followed by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering (tolerance, 1.0%). Scale bars represent pattern similarity (% for PFGE and genetic distance for SSR).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2815951&req=5

Figure 2: Genetic relationships showing the epidemiologic connection among 12 clinical and environmental Vibrio vulnificus biotype 3 isolates based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis compared to analysis at 12 single-sequence repeat (SSR) loci. PFGE profiles were compared by using the Dice coefficient followed by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering (tolerance, 1.0%). Scale bars represent pattern similarity (% for PFGE and genetic distance for SSR).
Mentions: To strengthen our typing results, we compared the epidemiologic SSR results to those of PFGE in 12 representative BT3 isolates. PFGE was performed and analyzed as described previously (8). Results for PFGE were generally similar to results for SSR (Figure 2). PFGE patterns were similar (>85%) between isolates. Identical PFGE patterns and SSR genotypes were seen in isolates v239 (clinical) and VVyb95, VVyb194 (environmental), as were isolates v232 (fish) and v254 (clinical). Identical PFGE patterns and single-locus variants in SSR genotypes were seen in clinical isolate v237 and the environmental isolates VVyb89 and VVyb1. Notably, VVyb1, which was isolated a year earlier, differentiated from VVyb89 by another single repeat in an additional single locus, confirming higher resolution of SSR method. Finally, identical SSR genotypes and PFGE patterns that differed by 1 band were seen in v240 and VVyb132.

Bottom Line: A 3-year environmental and clinical Vibrio vulnificus survey using simple-sequence repeats typing shows that V. vulnificus biotype 3 constitutes approximately 21% of the bacterium population in tested aquaculture ponds as opposed to approximately 86% of clinical cases.Simple-sequence repeats proved to be a useful epidemiologic tool, providing information on the environmental source of the pathogen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

ABSTRACT
A 3-year environmental and clinical Vibrio vulnificus survey using simple-sequence repeats typing shows that V. vulnificus biotype 3 constitutes approximately 21% of the bacterium population in tested aquaculture ponds as opposed to approximately 86% of clinical cases. Simple-sequence repeats proved to be a useful epidemiologic tool, providing information on the environmental source of the pathogen.

Show MeSH