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Cardiac echinococcosis, an unusual echocardiographic finding.

Cataño J - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2010)

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Affiliation: Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia. kataju@hotmail.com

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Initial manifestations of the patient with transesophageal echocardiography, showing a 4 × 3 cm cyst with multiple internal structures.
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Figure 1: Initial manifestations of the patient with transesophageal echocardiography, showing a 4 × 3 cm cyst with multiple internal structures.

Mentions: Cardiac echinococcosis is an unusual echocardiographic finding.1 An 18-year-old woman from Colombia, who had lived her entire life on a farm and had no remarkable medical history, was admitted to a hospital because of three weeks of non-specific upper abdominal pain and intermittent jaundice. There was no fever, chest pain, palpitation, dysnea, or other cardiac symptoms. Results of a heart examination were normal. Her laboratory data, including blood chemistries, electrocardiogram, and chest radiograph, were normal. Transesophageal echocardiography2 was performed because chest computed tomography showed an atrial mass, a 4 × 3 cm cyst with multiple and mobile small internal structures, in the right atrium. This finding was consistent with a cardiac hydatid cyst (Figure 1). Serologic analysis confirmed the diagnosis. Treatment with albendazole, 200 mg every 12 hours, was started, and 1 day before scheduled surgery she had fever. Cardiac complications were suspected because of the presence of the cyst. Therefore, another transesophageal echocardiogram was performed and showed a right atrial cyst without multiple internal mobile small kidney-shaped cystic lesions, which suggested cyst rupture with multiple cyst embolisms (Figure 2). Surgery was canceled and the patient responded well to albendazole treatment alone without recurrence of symptoms.


Cardiac echinococcosis, an unusual echocardiographic finding.

Cataño J - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2010)

Initial manifestations of the patient with transesophageal echocardiography, showing a 4 × 3 cm cyst with multiple internal structures.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2813152&req=5

Figure 1: Initial manifestations of the patient with transesophageal echocardiography, showing a 4 × 3 cm cyst with multiple internal structures.
Mentions: Cardiac echinococcosis is an unusual echocardiographic finding.1 An 18-year-old woman from Colombia, who had lived her entire life on a farm and had no remarkable medical history, was admitted to a hospital because of three weeks of non-specific upper abdominal pain and intermittent jaundice. There was no fever, chest pain, palpitation, dysnea, or other cardiac symptoms. Results of a heart examination were normal. Her laboratory data, including blood chemistries, electrocardiogram, and chest radiograph, were normal. Transesophageal echocardiography2 was performed because chest computed tomography showed an atrial mass, a 4 × 3 cm cyst with multiple and mobile small internal structures, in the right atrium. This finding was consistent with a cardiac hydatid cyst (Figure 1). Serologic analysis confirmed the diagnosis. Treatment with albendazole, 200 mg every 12 hours, was started, and 1 day before scheduled surgery she had fever. Cardiac complications were suspected because of the presence of the cyst. Therefore, another transesophageal echocardiogram was performed and showed a right atrial cyst without multiple internal mobile small kidney-shaped cystic lesions, which suggested cyst rupture with multiple cyst embolisms (Figure 2). Surgery was canceled and the patient responded well to albendazole treatment alone without recurrence of symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia. kataju@hotmail.com

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus